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July 21, 2016

Rusty Steel Triggers Oxygen Evolution: Corroded stainless steel plate makes up an efficient water splitting electrode

Electrocatalytic water splitting is one of the most promising next generation technologies for environmentally friendly and inexpensive energy conversion and storage. However, one of its biggest obstacles is the sluggishness of the oxidation reaction, which is key to the whole process. State-of-the-art technology relies on metal oxide electrocatalysts, but both cost and performance still need to be improved. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Chinese scientists have now introduced oxidized, that is, rusty, stainless-steel plates as excellent electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution. That technology could represent a surprisingly simple approach toward solving a long-standing problem.

July 20, 2016

Explosive Synthesis: Chemical synthesis of a powerful high-energy compound

Trinitrotoluene or TNT has been considered as the standard measure for explosives for 100 years, although new high-energy-density materials or HEDMs outperform this substance in terms of explosion power, safety, but also environmental compatibility. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Russian scientists present the synthesis of a highly interesting HEDM, which exhibits excellent energetic properties as well as a beautiful, butterfly-like structure.

July 13, 2016

Genetic Tests with the Naked Eye: Replication of enzyme-nucleotide chimeras

DNA polymerases are the “Xerox machines” that replicate our DNA. They must work with great precision to keep errors from creeping into our genes. In spite of this precision, they still accept building blocks that have been coupled to large proteins, as a group of German scientists reports in the journal Angewandte Chemie. Based on this fact, the team has developed detection systems for genotyping DNA and RNA that can be evaluated by the naked eye. This method may allow for new diagnostic tools for use in the field.

July 12, 2016

Counting Red Blood Cells: Electrochemical determination of the concentration and peroxidase activity of erythrocytes

Blood counts are routinely carried out before operations, in cases of infection, or when testing for a variety of diseases, such as anemia and leukemia. A key value in this test is the number of red blood cells (erythrocytes). Scientists at the University of Oxford (UK) have now introduced a simple nano-electrochemical process for the rapid, precise determination of the erythrocyte count. As described in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the test also determines the activity of individual erythrocytes toward hydrogen peroxide.

July 11, 2016

Facile Dosimetry for Chemical Hazards: Disposable, low-cost chemidosimetric indicator with smartphone connection

The detection of exposure to chemical hazards can save lives. American scientists have developed a smart and simple chemidosimeter based on a chemiresistive sensor combined with a near-field communication tag, which can be read-out by a smartphone. This chemically actuated resonant device (CARD) is made of simple components, is disposable, ready-to-use, needs no batteries, and can be worn as a badge by people who are likely exposed to chemical hazards. It is described in the journal Angewandte Chemie.

April 15, 2016

Monitoring Breathing: Paper-based electrical sensor developed to monitor respiration rate

A simple but effective sensor for monitoring the respiration rate of individuals has been created. Taking advantage of the hygroscopic character of ordinary paper, scientists at Harvard University have developed an electrical sensor to detect the periodic changes of humidity by breathing in and out. As they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the respiration data can be transmitted to and collected by nearby smartphones or tablet computers for further processing, storage, or transmittance to practical therapists. A simple face mask carrying the sensor system and worn in hospital wards may thus save lives.

April 13, 2016

Poor Lubrication: Astringent mouthfeel of wine results from a lubrication failure in the mouth

We are all familiar with that strange feeling in the mouth after a sip of red wine or tea, or a bite of unripe fruit. It has been described as dry, leathery, or even furry. This astringent effect is caused by tannins or polyphenolic compounds that bind to mucins, lubricating proteins in the mucus membranes of the mouth. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a Chinese and Korean research team has now shown the relationship between astringency and disrupted lubrication of the oral cavity.

April 01, 2016

Power from Sun and Rain: Graphene layer could allow solar cells to generate power when it rains

Solar energy is on the rise. Many technical advances have made solar cells quite efficient and affordable in recent years. A big disadvantage remains in the fact that solar cells produce no power when it’s raining. This may change, however: In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Chinese researchers have now introduced a new approach for making an all-weather solar cell that is triggered by both sunlight and raindrops.

January 20, 2015

Bulletin of the Korean Chemical Society expands international reach through partnership with Wiley-VCH

Wiley-VCH, part of the scientific and technical publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (NYSE: JWa and JWb) and the Korean Chemical Society have signed an agreement to closely cooperate and jointly publish the Bulletin of the Korean Chemical Society.

June 30, 2014

Small celebrates 10th anniversary in big way

Leading nanotechnology journal marks milestone with special session to discuss advanced healthcare materials breakthroughs at Korea’s leading event

October 17, 2013

Celebrating the Work of the 2013 Nobel Laureates

Wiley congratulates the winners of all the 2013 Nobel Prizes and is pleased to learn that ten laureates have published work in Wiley titles.

October 11, 2013

Wiley Congratulates the OPCW on Winning the Nobel Peace Prize for 2013

Wiley is pleased to learn that the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 2013

 

October 09, 2013

Wiley Congratulates the Winners of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Wiley congratulates Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt, and Arieh Warshel on winning the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2013

October 07, 2013

Wiley Congratulates Winners of 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Wiley is pleased to learn that the Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet has awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2013 to James E. Rothman, Randy W. Schekman, and Thomas C. Südhof.

September 16, 2013

Advanced Materials Editor Peter Gregory Awarded Two Chinese Professorships

Nanjing University of Technology and Shanghai Jiao Tong University Host Ceremonies

July 30, 2013

Jumping Crystals: Kinematic analysis of light-induced jumping crystals

Live beings are not the only things that can move around – it turns out that small crystals can also rotate or even jump. Scientists from United Arab Emirates and Russia have now systematically examined crystals that move when irradiated by light. In the journal Angewandte Chemie they present the first quantitative kinematic analysis of this phenomenon, which they have termed the photosalient effect.

July 24, 2013

Miniature Arm Lifts Weights: Artificial muscle contracts and expands with changes in humidity

A small plastic strip can do “weight training” to effortlessly lifts many times its own weight, driven by cyclic changes in the humidity of the surrounding air. This strong “artificial arm” is based on the interaction between microgels and a layer of polycations that shrinks as it dries, according to a report presented by Canadian researchers in the journal Angewandte Chemie.

July 17, 2013

Sugar Coating Reveals Black Death: Plague detection through anti-carbohydrate antibodies

Even today, the lives of humans and animals are claimed by plague. A new antibody-based detection method can be used to reliably and sensitively identify plague in patient serum and other biological samples. The antibody specifically recognizes a particular carbohydrate structure found on the cell surfaces of the bacterium that causes plague, as reported by German researchers in the journal Angewandte Chemie.

July 10, 2013

Stirred, Not Shaken: Nanoscale magnetic stir bars

Anyone who has ever worked in a laboratory has seen them: magnetic stirrers that rotate magnetic stir bars in liquids to mix them. The stir bars come in many different forms—now including nanometer-sized. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers from Singapore have now introduced chains made of 40 nm iron oxide particles that act as the world’s smallest magnetic stir bars, effectively stirring picoliter-sized drops of emulsion with a commercial magnetic stirrer.

July 01, 2013

Anthrax Killer from the Sea: Unusual antibiotic from a marine actinomycete is effective against anthrax

A new potential drug from a marine microorganism is effective against anthrax and various other Gram-positive bacteria, as reported by American scientists in the journal Angewandte Chemie. A chlorinated analogue kills off Gram-negative bacteria.

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