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June 30, 2014

Small celebrates 10th anniversary in big way

Leading nanotechnology journal marks milestone with special session to discuss advanced healthcare materials breakthroughs at Korea’s leading event

October 17, 2013

Celebrating the Work of the 2013 Nobel Laureates

Wiley congratulates the winners of all the 2013 Nobel Prizes and is pleased to learn that ten laureates have published work in Wiley titles.

October 11, 2013

Wiley Congratulates the OPCW on Winning the Nobel Peace Prize for 2013

Wiley is pleased to learn that the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 2013

 

October 09, 2013

Wiley Congratulates the Winners of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Wiley congratulates Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt, and Arieh Warshel on winning the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2013

October 07, 2013

Wiley Congratulates Winners of 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Wiley is pleased to learn that the Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet has awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2013 to James E. Rothman, Randy W. Schekman, and Thomas C. Südhof.

September 16, 2013

Advanced Materials Editor Peter Gregory Awarded Two Chinese Professorships

Nanjing University of Technology and Shanghai Jiao Tong University Host Ceremonies

July 30, 2013

Jumping Crystals: Kinematic analysis of light-induced jumping crystals

Live beings are not the only things that can move around – it turns out that small crystals can also rotate or even jump. Scientists from United Arab Emirates and Russia have now systematically examined crystals that move when irradiated by light. In the journal Angewandte Chemie they present the first quantitative kinematic analysis of this phenomenon, which they have termed the photosalient effect.

July 24, 2013

Miniature Arm Lifts Weights: Artificial muscle contracts and expands with changes in humidity

A small plastic strip can do “weight training” to effortlessly lifts many times its own weight, driven by cyclic changes in the humidity of the surrounding air. This strong “artificial arm” is based on the interaction between microgels and a layer of polycations that shrinks as it dries, according to a report presented by Canadian researchers in the journal Angewandte Chemie.

July 17, 2013

Sugar Coating Reveals Black Death: Plague detection through anti-carbohydrate antibodies

Even today, the lives of humans and animals are claimed by plague. A new antibody-based detection method can be used to reliably and sensitively identify plague in patient serum and other biological samples. The antibody specifically recognizes a particular carbohydrate structure found on the cell surfaces of the bacterium that causes plague, as reported by German researchers in the journal Angewandte Chemie.

July 10, 2013

Stirred, Not Shaken: Nanoscale magnetic stir bars

Anyone who has ever worked in a laboratory has seen them: magnetic stirrers that rotate magnetic stir bars in liquids to mix them. The stir bars come in many different forms—now including nanometer-sized. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers from Singapore have now introduced chains made of 40 nm iron oxide particles that act as the world’s smallest magnetic stir bars, effectively stirring picoliter-sized drops of emulsion with a commercial magnetic stirrer.

July 01, 2013

Anthrax Killer from the Sea: Unusual antibiotic from a marine actinomycete is effective against anthrax

A new potential drug from a marine microorganism is effective against anthrax and various other Gram-positive bacteria, as reported by American scientists in the journal Angewandte Chemie. A chlorinated analogue kills off Gram-negative bacteria.

June 27, 2013

Drinking Water from the Sea: Electrochemically mediated seawater desalination in microfluidic systems

A new method for the desalination of sea water has been reported by a team of American and German researchers in the journal Angewandte Chemie. In contrast to conventional methods, this technique consumes little energy and is very simple. This electrochemically mediated seawater desalination is based on a system of microchannels and a bipolar electrode.

June 19, 2013

Wearable Electronics: Highly conductive textiles and paper with aluminum

Jackets with built-in mobile phones, sports clothes that warn you when your heart rate gets too high, wallpaper with glowing patterns—these are not concepts from a science fiction movie, some of them are actually already available, and they may soon become commonplace. These applications require electrically conductive fibrous materials. Korean researchers have now developed a new process for rendering paper and textile fibers conductive with aluminum. Their report appears in the journal Angewandte Chemie.

June 12, 2013

Brushes in 3D: Complex three-dimensional polymer brush nanostructures from photopolymerization

Polymer brushes are polymers in which individual polymer chains stand side by side on a surface, causing the chains to stick out like bristles on a brush. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, American scientists have now presented a new simple method for making three-dimensional nanostructures in a controlled fashion from polymer brushes.

June 11, 2013

Head in a Cage: Fatty acid composition of diacylglycerols determines local signaling patterns

In the human body, lipids do not only serve as energy stores and structural elements, but they are also important signaling molecules. Disruptions of lipid signal transmission seem to be involved in diseases such as atherosclerosis and diabetes, as well as inflammation and pain. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers from Heidelberg have now reported on photoactivatable lipids that can be used to manipulate signaling processes in cells with both spatial and time resolution.

June 07, 2013

The Fastest and the Brightest: BODIPY–tetrazine derivatives as superbright bioorthogonal turn-on probes

American researchers have developed a probe for marking biomolecules that begins to fluoresce only when it is “switched on” by binding. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the reaction takes place very quickly and the difference in brightness between the “on” and “off” states is two orders of magnitude bigger than for conventional activatable probes.

May 27, 2013

Making Colors from Black and White: Colorfast pigments made from amorphous arrays of silicon dioxide and carbon black

It is very annoying when colors fade over time, sometimes simply from exposure to light. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Japanese scientists have now introduced a new type of colorfast, environmentally friendly pigment. These consist of submicrometer-sized silicon dioxide particles and carbon black and are simply sprayed on to the desire surface. The resulting color is tough and does not fade.

May 15, 2013

A Magic Process: A Bottom-up process for making dodecane-in-water nanoemulsions

A new process for generating nanometer-scale oil droplets in water has been reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie by Japanese researchers, who have developed a technique they named MAGIQ (monodisperse nanodroplet generation in quenched hydrothermal solution). Under standard conditions, hydrocarbons and water do not mix; however, at high temperatures and high pressures near the critical point of water, they freely mix. Quenching homogeneous solutions of dodecane and water under these conditions in the presence of a detergent produces nanoemulsions in just ten seconds.

May 13, 2013

Catalyst Keeps Fruit Fresh Longer: Even at low temperatures, platinum nanoparticles on a support catalyze breakdown of ethylene

Ripening fruit, vegetables, and flowers release ethylene, which works as a plant hormone. Ethylene accelerates ripening, so other unripened fruit also begins to ripen—fruit and vegetables quickly spoil and flowers wilt. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Japanese researchers have now introduced a new catalytic system for the fast and complete degradation of ethylene. This system could keep the air in warehouses ethylene-free, keeping perishable products fresh longer.

May 08, 2013

CO2 for Chemical Synthesis: Universal method for the catalytic methylation of amines with carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide is the most common source of carbon in nature and an inexpensive building block that is useful for the chemical industry. However, because of its high stability, it is not easy to induce CO2 to react. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, German scientists have now reported a universally applicable method for the catalytic methylation of amines with CO2.

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