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May 03, 2013

Separation by Milling: Separation of dicarboxylic acids through molecular recognition and mechanochemistry

How does one separate a mixture of components with very similar properties? In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Croatian researchers have introduced a new approach to the separation of organic compounds. In their process, a “host compound” recognizes the desired “guest molecules”, not only in solution, but also when the host and mixtures of competitive guest are milled together in the solid state. For the separation of maleic acid, this recognition through mechanochemistry delivers selectivity equal to that achieved by crystallization from a solution.

April 24, 2013

Threaded through a Pore: Single-molecule detection of hydroxymethylcytosine in DNA

Changes in the bases that make up DNA act as markers, telling a cell which genes it should read and which it shouldn’t. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a British team has now introduced a new method that makes it possible to enrich the rare gene segments that contain the modified base hydroxymethylcytosine and to identify individual hydroxymethylcytosine molecules in DNA. Such modifications are associated with autoimmune diseases and cancer.

April 18, 2013

“Salted” Catalysts for Chemical Energy Storage: Basic alkali–metal salts improve a catalyst for steam reforming of methanol

The storage of hydrogen in the form of methanol is a highly promising method for using excess energy produced by wind and solar power plants. However, this technology requires an effective catalyst for regenerating the hydrogen. German scientists have now introduced a new platinum catalyst for this reaction, known as the steam reforming of methanol, in the journal Angewandte Chemie. The secret of their success lies in a special coating made from molten basic alkali metal salts.

April 08, 2013

Get to Work, Enzymes! High yield: Cell-free enzyme cascade makes hydrogen from xylose

Fuel cells are a highly promising means of producing electricity. However, the hydrogen they require is still largely obtained from coal, oil, or natural gas. Producing hydrogen from less expensive biomass is an attractive alternative, but has not produced sufficient yields to date. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a team of American and Mexican researchers has now introduced a cell-free biosystem of thirteen enzymes that can produce hydrogen from xylose, one of the main components of plants, in yields of over 95 %.

April 02, 2013

Vitamin C Goes Astray: Reaction pathways for Maillard degradation of vitamin C

Vitamin C is found in many foods, and, among other things, is used to prolong shelf life. However, it is not stable in air or at room temperature. Cut fruits turn brown and the tastes of foods change. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, German researchers have now presented a systematic study of the processes that occur during the degradation of vitamin C.

March 21, 2013

Mouthwash to Fight Cancer? Oral disinfectants induce apoptosis in human oral tumor cells

Patients who suffer from gingivitis are often advised to use disinfectant mouthwashes. In the future, the active ingredients in these products could be used in a completely different area: As scientists have reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, Chlorhexidin and Alexidin increase programmed cell death and may be effective against cancers of the mouth and throat.

March 12, 2013

Wiley-VCH’s Eva Wille Awarded Carl Duisberg Medal

Eva Wille, Vice President and Executive Director for Global Chemistry, Wiley-VCH, has been awarded the 2013 Carl Duisberg Medal by Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh), the German Chemical Society, the leading continental European chemical society.

March 08, 2013

Inspired by Audio Cassettes: Economical nanostructured iron–cobalt catalysts for the Fischer–Tropsch synthesis

Audio cassettes make the production process for fuels less expensive: To produce nanoparticles made of inexpensive iron oxide cores with a very thin cobalt shell, an international team of researchers modified a method developed for the production of magnetic audio tapes. As the researchers report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, their particles are easily accessible on a large scale, and are excellent Fischer–Tropsch catalysts for the production of good diesel fractions.

March 06, 2013

Diamond Wires: Carbon nanowires obtained by tempering diamantane dicarboxylic acid inside carbon nanotubes

Carbon-based nanomaterials have unique properties that make them useful for many technical applications, including lightweight construction, electronics, energy generation, environmental technology, and medicine. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, an international team of researchers has now introduced a new process for the production of especially fine carbon nanowires from carbon in the diamond configuration. In this process, molecules with a diamond-like structure are linked together inside a carbon nanotube.

February 26, 2013

Airy but Thirsty: Ultralight, flexible, fire-resistant carbon nanotube aerogels from bacterial cellulose

They can absorb vast amounts of oil or organic compounds, yet they are nearly as light as air: highly porous solids made of a three-dimensional network of carbon nanotubes. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Chinese scientists have now introduced a simple technique for the production of these ultralight, flexible, fire-resistant aerogels. Their method begins with bacterial cellulose as an inexpensive starting material. Their fibrous lightweights can "suck" organic contaminants from polluted water and could possibly be used as pressure sensors.

February 21, 2013

Sandwich in a Pumpkin: Supramolecular velcro for underwater adhesion

When gluing things together, both surfaces usually need to be dry. Gluing wet surfaces or surfaces under water is a challenge. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Korean scientists have now introduced a completely new concept. They were able to achieve reversible underwater adhesion by using supramolecular "velcro".

February 14, 2013

Squeezing Out CO2. Post-combustion capture: metal-organic framework releases stored carbon dioxide in sunlight

In order to reduce the carbon dioxide output from coal power plants, CO2 could be removed from their exhaust (post-combustion capture) and stored or, if possible, used as a carbon source for chemical syntheses. Previous approaches to this have suffered from the fact that they require too much energy. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Australian scientists have now introduced a new metal–organic framework compound that absorbs CO2 and then releases it upon exposure to sunlight.

February 12, 2013

Uncovering Pathogens Outside the Lab. DNAzymes and gold nanoparticles: a colorimetric assay for diagnostics in the field

Infectious diseases such as malaria and syphilis can be diagnosed rapidly and reliably in the field by using a simple test developed by Canadian scientists. The test is based on the use of DNAzymes and gold nanoparticles. As the researchers report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, their test allows for the sensitive detection of bacteria, viruses, and parasites.

February 06, 2013

Light Makes Pores Bigger. Photo-growth of pores in a polymer gel network

Irradiation with light is an established method for initiating polymerization or crosslinking (curing) in the production of plastics. American researchers are now using light to retroactively increase the size of the pores within a polymer network. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, this new approach allows for the production of polymer gels with tailored mechanical properties.

January 21, 2013

It All Depends on the Length. Chemical functionalization of ‘toxic’ long carbon nanotubes reduces their effective length and alleviates asbestos-like pathogenicity

Carbon nanotubes resemble asbestos fibers in their form. Unfortunately, long, pure nanotubes also seem to have asbestos-like pathogenicity. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a European research team has now reported that chemical modifications, for example with tri(ethylene glycol), can alleviate this problem if the modification makes their surface more water-friendly and reduces the effective length of the tubes.

January 17, 2013

Clogged Pores for Increased Effectiveness. Whey protein stabilizes nanotransporter and controls pH-dependent drug release

How can pharmaceuticals be safely carried through the acidic environment of the stomach and into the intestines? A team of Canadian and Australian researchers has developed a novel nanotransporter that consists of porous particles of silicon dioxide stabilized with a whey protein. In acidic environments the protein forms a gel that closes off the pores; at higher pH values, the pores are opened.

January 15, 2013

Wiley Acquires Assets of FIZ Chemie Berlin

John Wiley & Sons, Inc., announced today that it has acquired the assets of the FIZ Chemie Berlin, a leading provider of online database products for organic and industrial chemists.

December 20, 2012

The journal Angewandte Chemie is celebrating its 125th anniversary as a world leader - with Nobel Laureates and other luminaries

On the occasion of its 125th anniversary, the journal Angewandte Chemie is treating its readers to a special issue, which contains no less than 16 contributions from chemistry Nobel Laureates, and also a symposium that will take place in Berlin in March and will feature three Nobel Laureates. In its 125-year history, the journal has developed from a magazine for the chemical industry in German-speaking countries (that's where the name of the journal comes from: Angewandte Chemie means "applied chemistry") to a modern global medium for fundamental chemical research. Both the English and German editions are available electronically, a form that has long since overtaken the printed issues. The journal has always been owned by scientific societies, and since 1947 it has been in the hands of the Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh; German Chemical Society), in close cooperation with its scientific publisher Wiley-VCH.

November 05, 2012

Inverse Fingerprints on Paper: Visualization of Latent Fingermarks by Nanotechnology: Reversed Development on Paper: A Possible Remedy to the Variation in Sweat Composition

Paper is one of the surfaces most commonly tested for fingerprints in forensics. Unfortunately, it is particularly difficult to make fingerprints on paper visible. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Israeli scientists have now introduced a new method developed specifically for use on paper. It produces a “negative” of the fingerprint and is, in contrast to conventional methods, independent of the composition of the sweat residue left behind.

October 26, 2012

What Authors Want From Open Access Publishing

John Wiley & Sons, Inc., today announced the results of an author survey on open access, with over ten thousand respondents from across Wiley’s journal portfolio. The research explored the factors that authors assess when deciding where to publish, and whether to publish open access.  Among the top factors considered by authors were the relevance and scope of the journal, the journal’s impact factor and the international reach of the journal.

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