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Annals of Neurology

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You selected: Annals of Neurology

12:00 AM EDT June 02, 2014

Speaking Two Languages Benefits the Aging Brain

New research reveals that bilingualism has a positive effect on cognition later in life. Findings published in Annals of Neurology, a journal of the American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society, show that individuals who speak two or more languages, even those who acquired the second language in adulthood, may slow down cognitive decline from aging.

12:00 AM EDT August 13, 2013

Stroke declines dramatically, still higher in Mexican Americans

A new study reports that the incidence of ischemic stroke—the most common type of stroke, caused by a clot in the blood vessels of the brain—among non-Hispanic Whites and Mexican Americans over age 60 has declined over the past decade. Most concerning, however, is that the increased relative burden of stroke comparing Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic Whites has not changed at all in the last decade. Overall, Mexican Americans suffer much more, 34%, from this disease than non-Hispanic Whites. Findings are published in Annals of Neurology, a journal of the American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society.

12:00 AM EDT May 09, 2013

Could Eating Peppers Prevent Parkinson’s?

New research reveals that Solanaceae—a flowering plant family with some species producing foods that are edible sources of nicotine—may provide a protective effect against Parkinson’s disease. The study appearing today in Annals of Neurology, a journal of the American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society, suggests that eating foods that contain even a small amount of nicotine, such as peppers and tomatoes, may reduce risk of developing Parkinson’s.

 

March 11, 2013

Common MS Drugs Taken Together Do Not Reduce Relapse Risk

A recent clinical trial found that interferonβ-1a (INF) and glatiramer acetate (GA), two of the most commonly prescribed drugs for multiple sclerosis (MS), provide no additional clinical benefit when taken together. While findings published today in Annals of Neurology, a journal of the American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society, suggest that taking both INF and GA together was not superior to GA monotherapy in reducing relapse risk; the combination therapy does appear to reduce new lesion activity and total lesion volume.

12:00 AM EST January 29, 2013

Eating Bright-Colored Fruits and Vegetables May Prevent or Delay ALS

New research suggests that increased consumption of foods containing colorful carotenoids, particularly beta-carotene and lutein, may prevent or delay the onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The study, published by Wiley in Annals of Neurology, a journal of the American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society, found that diets high in lycopene, beta-cryptoxanthin, and vitamin C did not reduce ALS risk.

12:00 AM EDT October 03, 2012

Infertility Treatments May Significantly Increase Multiple Sclerosis Activity

Researchers in Argentina report that women with multiple sclerosis (MS) who undergo assisted reproduction technology (ART) infertility treatment are at risk for increased disease activity. Study findings published in Annals of Neurology, a journal of the American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society, suggest reproductive hormones contribute to regulation of immune responses in autoimmune diseases such as MS.

12:00 AM EDT April 26, 2012

Eating More Berries May Reduce Cognitive Decline in the Elderly

Blueberries and strawberries, which are high in flavonoids, appear to reduce cognitive decline in older adults according to a new study published today in Annals of Neurology, a journal of the American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society. The study results suggest that cognitive aging could be delayed by up to 2.5 years in elderly who consume greater amounts of the flavonoid-rich berries.

12:00 AM EST March 01, 2012

Postmenopausal Women at Greater Risk of Stroke from High Trans Fat Intake

New research shows an increased risk of ischemic stroke in postmenopausal women who consume higher amounts of trans fatty acids, commonly found in baked goods, fried foods, and packaged products. Study findings now available in Annals of Neurology, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society, suggest aspirin use may moderate the stroke risk caused by a diet high in trans fats.

12:00 AM EST November 14, 2011

Parkinson's Disease Risk Greater in Those Exposed to Trichloroethylene

A novel study in twins found that exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE)—a hazardous organic contaminant found in soil, groundwater, and air—is significantly associated with increased risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Possibility of developing this neurodegenerative disease is also linked to perchloroethylene (PERC) and carbon tetrachloride (CCI4) exposure according to the study appearing today in Annals of Neurology, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society.

October 17, 2011

Shift Work in Teens Linked to Increased Multiple Sclerosis Risk

Researchers from Sweden have uncovered an association between shift work and increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). Those who engage in off-hour employment before the age of 20 may be at risk for MS due to a disruption in their circadian rhythm and sleep pattern. Findings of this novel study appear today in Annals of Neurology, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society.

October 04, 2011

Preterm Infants Exposed to Stressors in NICU Display Reduced Brain Size

New research shows that exposure to stressors in the Neonatal Intensive care Unit (NICU) is associated with alterations in the brain structure and function of very preterm infants.

September 01, 2011

Increased Prevalence of Stroke Hospitalizations Seen in Teens and Young Adults

Ischemic stroke hospitalization rates in adolescents and young adults aged 15 to 44 increased up to 37% between 1995 and 2008 according to a study conducted by researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

August 22, 2011

Study Finds Narcolepsy Cases in China Peak in Early Spring

New research shows that the occurrence of narcolepsy in China is highly correlated to a seasonal pattern, with onset most frequent in April.

August 12, 2011

Scientists Identify Mutation in SIGMAR1 Gene Linked to Juvenile ALS

Researchers from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia have identified a mutation on the SIGMAR1 gene associated with the development of juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

12:00 AM EDT June 27, 2011

Study Finds Pregnancy Safe in Multiple Sclerosis

Canadian researchers have found that maternal multiple sclerosis (MS) is generally not associated with adverse delivery outcomes or risk to their offspring. Full findings now appear in Annals of Neurology, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American Neurological Association.

12:00 AM EDT June 17, 2011

Etanercept Shows Promise for Treating Dermatomyositis

A multicenter pilot study of etanercept for treatment of dermatomyositis found no major safety concerns and many patients treated with the drug were successfully weaned from steroid therapy. These results are encouraging, but larger studies are needed to further investigate the safety and efficacy of etanercept. Results of this clinical trial are available in Annals of Neurology, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American Neurological Association.

May 26, 2011

Cognitive Decline Incidence Higher in Southern Stroke Belt

New research shows that residents of the Stroke Belt—a southern portion of the U.S. with significantly elevated stroke morality rate—also have a greater incidence of cognitive decline than other regions of the country.

February 21, 2011

Increasing Triglyceride Levels Linked to Greater Stroke Risk

A study by researchers in Denmark revealed that increasing levels of non-fasting triglycerides are associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke in men and women. Higher cholesterol levels were associated with greater stroke risk in men only. Details of this novel, 33-year study are now available online in Annals of Neurology, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American Neurological Association.

September 23, 2010

New Studies Question Vascular Multiple Sclerosis Hypothesis and Treatment

Two important new studies challenge the controversial hypothesis that venous congestion—chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI)—contributes to the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). This theory has resulted in many MS patients receiving experimental endovascular angioplasty, a treatment for MS unproven by clinical trials. The studies refuting the CCSVI theory with the first negative medical evidence on the subject, are available today in Annals of Neurology, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American Neurological Association.

September 20, 2010

Higher Incidence of Seizures Seen in Children with H1N1 Virus Compared to Seasonal Flu

Vaccination Important to Combat Flu-Related Neurological Complications.

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