Arthritis & Rheumatology

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August 15, 2016

DASH Diet May Help Prevent Gout Flares

New research indicates that a healthy diet can effectively lower blood levels of uric acid, a known trigger of gout. The findings are published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR).

August 01, 2016

Chondroitin sulfate + glucosamine sulfate may provide no benefits for patients with knee osteoarthritis

Chondroitin sulfate (CS) plus glucosamine sulfate (GS) was no better than placebo for reducing pain and function impairment in a multicenter, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study of 164 patients with knee osteoarthritis.

October 19, 2015

Gout Risk High in Patients with Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea may increase the risk of developing gout, a new study shows.

October 05, 2015

Study Shows the Effects of Rare Autoimmune Diseases on the Health of Pregnant Women and their Babies

In a recent analysis of 2001 to 2011 data from Australia, pregnant women with rare autoimmune diseases had a higher likelihood of developing conditions such as hypertensive and bleeding disorders and required longer hospitalization at delivery than other pregnant women

September 08, 2015

Arthritis May Be a Major Driver of Poverty

Developing arthritis increases the risk of falling into poverty, especially for women, new research shows.

12:00 AM EDT August 31, 2015

Knee and Hip Replacements May Be Bad for the Heart

Contrary to recent reports, Boston-based researchers found that osteoarthritis patients who had total knee or hip joint replacement surgery, known as arthroplasty, were at increased risk of heart attack (myocardial infarction) in the early post-operative period. However, findings published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), indicate that long-term risk of heart attack did not persist, while the risk for venous thromboembolism—blood clot in veins and lungs—remained years after the procedure.

July 20, 2015

How Effective is Total Knee Replacement in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis?

In a new study that assessed the effects of total knee replacement in rheumatoid arthritis patients versus osteoarthritis patients, researchers found that the surgery is highly effective in reducing knee pain and also provides benefits in other subjective quality of life indices in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Improvements were not as great as those experienced by osteoarthritis patients, however.

May 04, 2015

Weight Loss May Increase Risk of Premature Death in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

In contrast to the general population, low body mass index has been associated with premature death in patients with rheumatoid arthritis —a situation known as the “obesity paradox.” A new Arthritis & Rheumatology study shows that weight loss, as opposed to low body mass index per se, is a strong predictor of mortality in these patients.

12:05 AM EDT April 21, 2015

Patients Grapple with High Cost of Arthritis Medications

The first national investigation of Medicare coverage of biologic disease modifying drugs (DMARDs) found that in starting a single biologic DMARD, patients face more than $2,700 in copayments each year before receiving relief from catastrophic coverage. Results published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), show that during the initial phase of coverage, most people are expected to pay a striking 29.6% of total biologic drugs costs (just under one-third) out-of-pocket, creating an enormous financial burden for patients with chronic, rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

March 16, 2015

World Trade Center Workers at Increased Risk of Developing Autoimmune Diseases

A new study has found a strong link between prolonged work at the World Trade Center (WTC) site following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 and the development of various autoimmune diseases including arthritis and lupus.

February 18, 2015

Poor Care for Blacks, Hispanics with End-stage Renal Disease from Lupus Nephritis

A new study found that Black and Hispanic patients are less likely than Whites to receive proper care prior to diagnosis with end-stage renal disease due to lupus nephritis, especially in terms of vascular access placement.

February 18, 2015

Osteoarthritis More Common Following ACL Surgery, Mostly in Men

New research published in Arthritis & Rheumatology reports that osteoarthritis (OA) is more common in patients following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, commonly known as ACL surgery, than in those with uninjured knees

February 18, 2015

New Treatment Option for Older Adults with Systemic Vasculitis

A randomized controlled trial in patients 65 years of age and older shows that a “new and lighter treatment” plan was safer and more effective than conventional therapy in inducing remission in the systemic necrotizing vasculitides—a group of diseases that cause inflammation in various blood vessels

12:00 AM EST January 15, 2015

Lower Mortality Rates Among Asian and Hispanic Lupus Patients

A new study by researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts reveals that Asian and Hispanic patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have lower mortality rates compared to Black, White, or Native Americans with the disease. Findings published in Arthritis & Rheumatology,a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), indicate that the risk for death among White patients is much lower than in Black and Native American SLE patients.

12:00 AM EST December 11, 2014

Nighttime Gout Attack Risk More Than Two Times Higher than in the Daytime

Novel research reveals that the risk of acute gout attacks is more than two times higher during the night or early morning hours than it is in the daytime. The study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), confirms that nocturnal attacks persist even among those who did not consume alcohol and had a low amount of purine intake during the 24 hours prior to the gout attack.

12:00 AM EST November 13, 2014

Moms with Rheumatoid Arthritis More Likely to Give Birth Prematurely

Researchers from Denmark and the U.S. report that babies of women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or pre-clinical RA—the period prior to symptoms—are 1.5 times more likely to be born prematurely in Denmark. Findings published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), indicate that body measurements of the baby at birth were only slightly lower in children exposed to maternal or preclinical RA compared to those with no exposure to the disease. Paternal RA was not found to impact fetal growth or preterm birth risk.

12:00 AM EDT October 20, 2014

Mummy Remains Refute Antiquity of Ankylosing Spondylitis

Ankylosing spondylitis is a systemic disease that causes inflammation in the spinal joints and was thought to have affected members of the ancient Egyptian royal families. Now a new study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), refutes that claim, finding instead a degenerative spinal condition called diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) in royal Egyptian mummies from the 18th to early 20th Dynasties.


12:00 AM EDT September 15, 2014

Hypersensitivity to Non-Painful Events May Be Part of Pathology in Fibromyalgia

New research shows that patients with fibromyalgia have hypersensitivity to non-painful events based on images of the patients’ brains, which show reduced activation in primary sensory regions and increased activation in sensory integration areas. Findings published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), suggest that brain abnormalities in response to non-painful sensory stimulation may cause the increased unpleasantness that patients experience in response to daily visual, auditory and tactile stimulation.

12:00 AM EDT August 11, 2014

One in Six Lupus Patients Readmitted to Hospital within 30 days of Discharge

A new study reveals that one in six patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of being discharged. Results published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), show that black and Hispanic SLE patients were more likely to be readmitted than white patients. Readmissions among patients insured by Medicare or Medicaid were also more likely compared to patients covered by private insurance.

12:00 AM EDT June 30, 2014

One Third of Knee Replacements Classified as Inappropriate

New research reports that more than one third of total knee replacements in the U.S. were classified as “inappropriate” using a patient classification system developed and validated in Spain. The study, published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), highlights the need for consensus on patient selection criteria among U.S. medical professionals treating those with the potential need of knee replacement surgery.