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12:00 AM EST February 25, 2013

Screening Could Avert 12,000 Lung Cancer Deaths Each Year in the United States

Screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in all screening-eligible current and former smokers has the potential to avert approximately 12,000 lung cancer deaths each year in the United States. That is the conclusion of a new analysis published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. By providing a national estimate of potentially avertable lung cancer deaths, the study will help policy makers better understand the possible benefits of LDCT lung cancer screening.

12:00 AM EST February 11, 2013

Exercise Linked with Reduced Prostate Cancer Risk in Caucasians But Not African Americans

A new study suggests that exercise may reduce Caucasian men’s risk of developing prostate cancer. And among Caucasian men who do have prostate cancer, exercise may reduce their risk of having more serious forms of the disease. Unfortunately, the benefits do not seem to apply to African-American men. The study is published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.

12:00 AM EST January 28, 2013

Better Survival Rates Seen with Lumpectomy Compared with Mastectomy for Early Breast Cancer

A new analysis has found that lumpectomy plus radiation for early breast cancer may provide patients with a better chance of survival than mastectomy. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the results provide confidence in the efficacy of breast-conserving treatments even among patients with aggressive, early disease.

12:00 AM EST January 14, 2013

Smoking Intensity and Cancer Markers Predict Seriousness of Bladder Cancer

Smoking not only causes bladder cancer—it also affects its course, in that people who smoke more have greater likelihood of developing more aggressive and deadly disease. That is one of the conclusions of a new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The study also found that a panel of bladder cancer markers can predict which particular cases are at the highest risk for a fatal outcome.

12:00 AM EST December 17, 2012

Snack Attack: Eating Unhealthy Snack Foods May Affect Cancer Risk in Patients with Lynch Syndrome

A new analysis has found that loading up on snack foods may increase cancer risk in individuals with an inborn susceptibility to colorectal and other cancers. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study suggests that an eating pattern low in snack foods could help these individuals—who have a condition called Lynch syndrome—lower their risk.

12:00 AM EST December 03, 2012

Common Diabetes Drug May Help Treat Ovarian Cancer

A new study suggests that the common diabetes medication metformin may be considered for use in the prevention or treatment of ovarian cancer. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study found that ovarian cancer patients who took the drug tended to live longer than patients who did not take it.

12:00 AM EST November 12, 2012

Black Patients with Kidney Cancer Have Poorer Survival than Whites

Among patients with the most common form of kidney cancer, whites consistently have a survival advantage over blacks, regardless of patient and tumor characteristics or surgical treatment. That is the conclusion of a new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The study’s results suggest that additional efforts are needed to prolong the survival of all patients with kidney cancer.

12:00 AM EDT October 22, 2012

Metabolic Factors May Increase Men’s Risk of Dying from Prostate Cancer

High blood pressure, blood sugar, blood lipids, and body mass index—characteristics that are often lumped together as the metabolic syndrome—are jointly linked with an increased risk of dying from prostate cancer. That is the conclusion of a new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The study’s results suggest that public health recommendations regarding diet and lifestyle to prevent heart disease and diabetes may also decrease a man’s likelihood of dying from prostate cancer.

12:00 AM EDT October 08, 2012

Gene Variant Linked with Reduced Lung Cancer Risk

A variant in a gene involved with inflammation and the immune response is linked with a decreased risk of lung cancer. That is the finding of an analysis published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The results add to the growing body of literature implicating these processes in the development of lung cancer.

12:00 AM EDT September 24, 2012

Young Cancer Survivors Often Forgo Medical Care Due to Costs

Many survivors of adolescent and young adult cancers avoid routine medical care because it’s too expensive, despite the fact that most have health insurance. That is the conclusion of a new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The results indicate that expanding insurance coverage for young cancer survivors may be insufficient to safeguard their long-term health without efforts to reduce their medical cost burdens.

12:00 AM EDT September 10, 2012

Marijuana Use May Increase Risk of Testicular Cancer

A new study from the University of Southern California (USC) has found a link between recreational marijuana use and an increased risk of developing subtypes of testicular cancer that tend to carry a somewhat worse prognosis. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings suggest that the potential cancer-causing effects of marijuana on testicular cells should be considered not only in personal decisions regarding recreational drug use, but also when marijuana and its derivatives are used for therapeutic purposes in young male patients.

12:00 AM EDT August 27, 2012

Obese and Overweight Women Face Increased Risk of Recurrence of Most Common Type of Breast Cancer

Extra pounds—even within the overweight but not obese range—are linked to a higher risk of recurrence of the most common type of breast cancer despite optimal cancer treatment, according to a new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The study’s results suggest that extra body fat causes hormonal changes and inflammation that may drive some cases of breast cancer to spread and recur despite treatment.

12:00 AM EDT August 13, 2012

For Most Older Women with Early Stage Breast Cancer, Radiation after Lumpectomy Helps Prevent Need for Subsequent Mastectomy

Contrary to clinical recommendations, older women with early stage breast cancer may want to undergo radiation after lumpectomy to help ensure that they will not need a mastectomy in the future. That is the conclusion of a new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The findings indicate that current thinking on the risks and benefits of radiation for early stage breast cancer in older women may be inaccurate.

12:00 AM EDT July 30, 2012

What Would Happen Without PSA Testing?

A new analysis has found that doing away with PSA (prostate specific antigen) testing for prostate cancer would likely cause three times as many men to develop advanced disease that has spread to other parts of the body before being diagnosed. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study suggests that PSA testing and early detection may prevent approximately 17,000 men each year from having such advanced prostate cancer at diagnosis.

12:00 AM EDT July 16, 2012

Study Reveals Optimal Interval for Stomach Cancer Screening

A new study has determined how often people should get screened for gastric or stomach cancer in high-risk regions of the world. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings could help reduce deaths from gastric cancer, which is the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality.

12:00 AM EDT June 25, 2012

Exercise, even mild physical activity, may reduce breast cancer risk

A new analysis has found that physical activity – either mild or intense and before or after menopause – may reduce breast cancer risk, but substantial weight gain may negate these benefits. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings indicate that women can reduce their breast cancer risk by exercising and maintaining their weight.

12:00 AM EDT June 11, 2012

Many Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors Have Poor Long-Term Physical and Mental Health

A new analysis has found that many adolescent and young adult cancer survivors have unhealthy behaviors, chronic medical conditions, a poor quality of life, and significant barriers to health care access. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates that greater efforts are needed to provide quality follow-up care to adolescent and young adult cancer survivors and to encourage them to live more healthily.

12:00 AM EDT May 29, 2012

Commonly Used Painkillers May Protect Against Skin Cancer

A new study suggests that aspirin and other similar painkillers may help protect against skin cancer. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings indicate that skin cancer prevention may be added to the benefits of these commonly used medications.

12:00 AM EDT May 14, 2012

Blood Pressure Drugs Don’t Protect Against Colorectal Cancer

A new study has found that, contrary to current thinking, taking beta blockers that treat high blood pressure does not decrease a person’s risk of developing colorectal cancer. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study also revealed that even long-term use or subtypes of beta blockers showed no reduction of colorectal cancer risk.

12:00 AM EDT April 23, 2012

Hispanic Lung Cancer Patients Tend to Live Longer Than Blacks and Whites

A new analysis has found that Hispanic lung cancer patients seem to live longer than white or black patients. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study suggests that, as with several other types of cancer, certain yet-to-be-defined genetic and/or environmental factors put Hispanic patients at a survival advantage.

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