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April 26, 2011

Among Lung and Colorectal Cancer Patients, Blacks Are Most Willing to Exhaust Personal Finances for Life-Sustaining Care

Minority races—especially Blacks—are more willing than Whites to expend personal financial resources to prolong life after being diagnosed with lung or colorectal cancer, even if it means using up all of their personal financial resources. That is the conclusion of a new study published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. Delivering quality cancer care that is in accordance with patients’ wishes requires a better understanding of the reasons for these differences in preference.

April 11, 2011

Sleep Issues Contribute to Cognitive Problems in Childhood Cancer Survivors

A new analysis has found that childhood cancer survivors often suffer from sleep problems and fatigue, which negatively impact their attention and memory. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates that addressing sleep hygiene among survivors of childhood cancer may help to improve their cognitive health.

March 28, 2011

Certain Breast Cancer Patients Worry Excessively About Recurrence

A new study has found that certain types of women with early stage breast cancer are vulnerable to excessive worrying about cancer recurrence. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study also indicates that worrying about cancer recurrence can compromise patients’ medical care and quality of life.

March 14, 2011

Taking Tamoxifen to Prevent Breast Cancer Can Save Lives and Money

Tamoxifen, taken by certain women as a preventive measure against breast cancer, saves lives and reduces medical costs. That is the conclusion of a new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The study’s results suggest that the benefits of tamoxifen to prevent cancer can sufficiently compensate for its side effects in post-menopausal women under age 55 years who have an increased risk of developing breast cancer.

February 28, 2011

Fish Oil Fights Weight Loss Due to Chemotherapy

A new analysis has found that supplementing the diet with fish oil may prevent muscle and weight loss that commonly occurs in cancer patients who undergo chemotherapy. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates that fish oil may help combat cancer-related malnutrition.

January 24, 2011

Anti-Estrogen Medication Reduces Risk of Dying from Lung Cancer

A new study has found that tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen breast cancer medication, may reduce an individual’s risk of death from lung cancer. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study supports the hypothesis that there is a hormonal influence on lung cancer and that estrogen levels play a role in lung cancer patients’ prognosis.

January 10, 2011

Race Affects Regional Colorectal Cancer Screening Disparities

Individuals from certain areas of the United States are more likely to get screened for colorectal cancer than those from other areas, particularly when comparing non-whites living in different parts of the country. That is the conclusion of a new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. Additional research is needed to better understand how colorectal cancer screening disparities develop in some regions and not in others.

December 13, 2010

Ovarian Cancer Screening Saves Few Lives

The best currently available screening tests can only slightly reduce ovarian cancer deaths. That is the conclusion of new research published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The results suggest that strategies other than screening, such as prevention and better treatments, will be needed to significantly lower the number of women who die from ovarian cancer.

November 22, 2010

Prostate Cancer Clinical Stage Does Not Predict Recurrence

A new study challenges the current staging system that determines the extent or severity of prostate cancer that has not metastasized. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study found that there is no link between localized prostate cancer’s clinical stage and a patient’s risk of cancer recurrence after having his prostate removed.

November 08, 2010

Breast Cancer Patients Prefer Silicone over Saline Implants After Mastectomy

A new study has found that women who receive silicone implants after a double mastectomy are more satisfied with their breasts than women who receive saline implants.

October 25, 2010

Colorectal Cancer Screening Can Be Expanded by Offering it During Mammography Visits

Colorectal Cancer Screening Can Be Expanded by Offering it During Mammography Visits

October 11, 2010

Insurance and Socioeconomic Status Do Not Explain Racial Disparities in Breast Cancer Care

Racial disparities in the receipt of breast cancer care persist despite accounting for patients’ insurance and social and economic status.

September 27, 2010

Partners of Breast Cancer Patients Are at Risk of Developing Mood Disorders

A new analysis finds that men whose partners have breast cancer are at increased risk of developing mood disorders that are so severe that they warrant hospitalization.

September 13, 2010

Early Detection and Screening of Prostate Cancer Provide No Benefits for Men with Low Baseline PSA Values

Men aged 55 to 74 years who have low baseline blood levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) are not likely to benefit from further screening and treatment. That is the conclusion of a new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The aim of the study is to help physicians and patients weigh the pros and cons of prostate cancer screening and early detection.

August 23, 2010

Cost of Prostate Cancer Care Varies with Initial Treatment Choice

A new analysis has found that short-term and long-term costs of prostate cancer care vary considerably based on which treatment strategy a man initially receives. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study finds that treatments that may be less expensive in the short-term may have higher long-term costs.

August 23, 2010

Rectal Cancer Rates Are Rising in Young Individuals

A new analysis has found that while colon cancer rates have remained steady over the past several decades among people under the age of 40, rectal cancer rates are increasing in this population across races and in both sexes.

August 02, 2010

Socioeconomic Status Predicts Survival of Canadian Cancer Patients

A new analysis from Canada has found that cancer patients from poorer communities have a greater chance of dying prematurely than individuals from more affluent backgrounds even though cancer stage at time of diagnosis is similar across socioeconomic groups. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates that efforts are needed to understand and reduce disparities in the survival of cancer patients from different socioeconomic groups.

August 02, 2010

Certain Meat Components May Increase Bladder Cancer Risk

A new study suggests that consuming specific compounds in meat related to processing methods may be associated with an increased risk of developing bladder cancer. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings may be relevant for understanding the role of dietary exposures in cancer risk.

July 12, 2010

Comorbidities and Socioeconomic Status Contribute to Racial Disparities in Colorectal Cancer Survival

A new analysis has found that other medical conditions and lower socioeconomic status contribute to lower survival rates among African American colorectal cancer patients relative to Whites and Asians. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study also found that racial disparities in colorectal cancer survival are not fully explained by differences in a number of suspected factors.

July 12, 2010

Complementary Therapy Does Not Benefit Children Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

A new study indicates that complementary therapies do not help alleviate distress in children undergoing stem cell transplantation (SCT). Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study also suggests that children are coping well with standard supportive care.

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