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September 27, 2010

Partners of Breast Cancer Patients Are at Risk of Developing Mood Disorders

A new analysis finds that men whose partners have breast cancer are at increased risk of developing mood disorders that are so severe that they warrant hospitalization.

September 13, 2010

Early Detection and Screening of Prostate Cancer Provide No Benefits for Men with Low Baseline PSA Values

Men aged 55 to 74 years who have low baseline blood levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) are not likely to benefit from further screening and treatment. That is the conclusion of a new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The aim of the study is to help physicians and patients weigh the pros and cons of prostate cancer screening and early detection.

August 23, 2010

Cost of Prostate Cancer Care Varies with Initial Treatment Choice

A new analysis has found that short-term and long-term costs of prostate cancer care vary considerably based on which treatment strategy a man initially receives. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study finds that treatments that may be less expensive in the short-term may have higher long-term costs.

August 23, 2010

Rectal Cancer Rates Are Rising in Young Individuals

A new analysis has found that while colon cancer rates have remained steady over the past several decades among people under the age of 40, rectal cancer rates are increasing in this population across races and in both sexes.

August 02, 2010

Certain Meat Components May Increase Bladder Cancer Risk

A new study suggests that consuming specific compounds in meat related to processing methods may be associated with an increased risk of developing bladder cancer. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings may be relevant for understanding the role of dietary exposures in cancer risk.

August 02, 2010

Socioeconomic Status Predicts Survival of Canadian Cancer Patients

A new analysis from Canada has found that cancer patients from poorer communities have a greater chance of dying prematurely than individuals from more affluent backgrounds even though cancer stage at time of diagnosis is similar across socioeconomic groups. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates that efforts are needed to understand and reduce disparities in the survival of cancer patients from different socioeconomic groups.

July 12, 2010

Complementary Therapy Does Not Benefit Children Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

A new study indicates that complementary therapies do not help alleviate distress in children undergoing stem cell transplantation (SCT). Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study also suggests that children are coping well with standard supportive care.

July 12, 2010

Comorbidities and Socioeconomic Status Contribute to Racial Disparities in Colorectal Cancer Survival

A new analysis has found that other medical conditions and lower socioeconomic status contribute to lower survival rates among African American colorectal cancer patients relative to Whites and Asians. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study also found that racial disparities in colorectal cancer survival are not fully explained by differences in a number of suspected factors.

June 28, 2010

More than A Million Parents with Minor Children are Cancer Survivors

For the first time, researchers have estimated the percentage and number of cancer survivors who live with their minor children. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study’s results may help address the unmet needs of this unique group of patients and their families.

June 28, 2010

Statins May Prevent Prostate Cancer Recurrence Following Surgery

A new analysis has found that patients taking statins had a lower risk of cancer recurrence after surgical removal of the prostate. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study says if the association is confirmed in other studies, a randomized clinical trial of statins among men undergoing prostatectomy may be warranted.

June 14, 2010

Study Reveals Causes of Survival Disparities Based on Insurance Among Rectal Cancer Patients

Disparities in cancer stage and treatment are the main reasons why Medicaid-insured and uninsured rectal cancer patients are twice as likely to die within five years as privately insured patients. That is the conclusion of a new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. Because poorer survival among rectal cancer patients without private insurance is largely attributable to later cancer stage at diagnosis and inadequate treatment, disparities may be lessened through health care reform.

June 14, 2010

Cost Concerns Prevent Many Cancer Survivors from Getting Medical Care

A new analysis has found that two million cancer survivors did not get needed medical services in the previous year because of concerns about cost. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study raises the concern that the long-term health and well-being of cancer survivors could suffer because patients have financial worries about their care.

May 24, 2010

African-Americans and Women are Less Likely to Undergo Bone Marrow Transplantation

African-Americans and women are less likely than Caucasians and men to undergo bone marrow transplantation to treat cancers of the blood. That is the conclusion of a new analysis published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The study’s results indicate that additional research is needed to determine why disparities exist in access to bone marrow transplantation and also that the medical community should work to eliminate these inequities.

May 24, 2010

Childhood Cancer Survivors Face Health Problems Throughout Life

Adult survivors of childhood cancer experience poorer health, more medical illnesses, greater limitations in daily functioning, and decreased productivity compared with adults who did not have cancer as children. Those are the findings of a study published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The results suggest that the effects of childhood cancer are long-lasting and that survivors deserve special attention from the medical community throughout their lives.

May 10, 2010

Kidney Removal Does Not Prolong the Lives of Elderly Patients with Localized Kidney Cancer

A new study indicates that patients aged 75 years or older who have confined kidney tumors do not live longer if they have their entire kidney removed. The research reveals that these patients typically have other medical problems of greater significance and that many should receive more conservative cancer-related care, such as observation or treatments that spare the noncancerous parts of their kidneys. The study is published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.

May 10, 2010

Medical Costs of Cancer Have Nearly Doubled Over the Past Two Decades

A new analysis finds that the costs of treating cancer have nearly doubled over the past two decades and that the shares of these costs that are paid for by private health insurance and Medicaid have increased. The study also reveals that cancer costs have shifted away from inpatient treatments to outpatient care.

April 26, 2010

Breast Cancer Risk Factors Differ Among Races

A new study finds that factors known to increase the risk of breast cancer among white women have less influence in Hispanic women. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates that research is needed to evaluate how breast cancer risk factors differ among ethnic and racial populations.

April 12, 2010

Hispanics Live In Areas with Limited Capacity for Colorectal Cancer Screening

A new study finds that Hispanics live in areas with more limited availability of colonoscopies and sigmoidoscopies for colorectal cancer screening. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates that differences in areas’ capacity for providing these procedures may explain why Hispanics are less likely to undergo colorectal cancer screening than non-Hispanic whites. Increasing screening may require efforts to improve the availability of endoscopy in areas with a high ethnic minority population.

April 12, 2010

Terminal Cancer Patients Do Not Receive Appropriate Radiation Therapy

A new analysis has found that a considerable proportion of patients with end-stage or terminal cancer do not benefit from palliative radiation therapy (radiotherapy) despite spending most of their remaining life undergoing treatments. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates that greater efforts are needed to tailor appropriately palliative radiotherapy to patients with end-stage cancer.

March 22, 2010

Racial Disparities Diminish in Specialized Cancer Centers

A new study has found that when African American and white cancer patients are treated at similar, specialized cancer care institutions, mortality rates are roughly equal. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings suggest that where patients receive care may partly explain observed racial disparities in cancer mortality.

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