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April 26, 2016

Aspirin May Help Prevent Bile Duct Cancer

Regular use of aspirin was linked with a significantly reduced risk of developing bile duct cancer, also called cholangiocarcinoma, in a recent study. The findings, which are published in the journal Hepatology, indicate that additional research on the potential of aspirin for preventing bile duct cancer is warranted.

February 01, 2016

Study Examines Long-Term Effectiveness of Hepatitis A Vaccination in Children

In a follow-up study of children who were vaccinated against hepatitis A virus at ages 6 to 21 months, most children who were vaccinated at 12 or 15 months continued to have anti-hepatitis A antibodies in their blood until at least age 15 to 16 years, and modeling experiments suggested that this protection should persist for at least 30 years.

November 16, 2015

Gene Variant May Increase Risk of Liver Disease in Obese Youth

Researchers have found that a genetic variant is linked with an increased risk of fatty liver disease in obese youth; however, children with the variant tend to have lower total and LDL cholesterol levels.

September 01, 2015

Cirrhosis, Antibodies Increase Risk of Poor Outcome for Autoimmune Hepatitis Patients

New research reports that cirrhosis at first diagnosis and antibodies for the soluble liver antigen/liver pancreas antigen (SLA/LP) are major risk factors for poor short- and long-term outcome in patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Results published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, also found that patients diagnosed in childhood were at higher risk of relapse, need of a liver transplant, and reduced life expectancy.

August 17, 2015

Liver Problems Will Likely Increase in Adults

Liver diseases affect hundreds of millions of people and cause significant illness and death. A new study indicates that liver scarring (or fibrosis), which can ultimately lead to liver failure, is fairly common.

June 25, 2015

AASLD Updates Guidance for Use of Hepatitis C Drugs

The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD), in partnership with the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and in collaboration with the International Antiviral Society-USA (IAS-USA), created online Recommendations for Testing, Managing, and Treating Hepatitis C in 2014 to aid practitioners treating patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Now an update to the Guidance, with a summary of recommendations regarding treatment with direct-acting antiviral drugs, is published in the AASLD journal, Hepatology.

June 01, 2015

FDA Addresses Concerns on Approval of Drugs to Treat Chronic Hepatitis C

Treatment options for chronic hepatitis C, a serious and life-threatening infection, have improved substantially and several new regimens with shorter durations and improved efficacy and safety profiles are now available.

April 21, 2015

Risk of Hepatitis D Higher Among HIV Infected and Injection Drug Users

Researchers from Taiwan determined that individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or those who inject illicit drugs have a higher risk of becoming infected with the hepatitis D virus (HDV) in that country. The study, published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, suggests that effective strategies are need to contain a potential HDV epidemic in these high-risk populations.

March 16, 2015

Available Treatments for Hepatitis C Virus Cost-Effective When Initiated Early

New treatments for hepatitis C virus (HCV) may be highly effective but are associated with substantial costs that may compel clinicians and patients to consider delaying treatment. However, a new study shows that immediate treatment of HCV-infected patients with moderate or advanced liver scarring is cost-effective. Immediate treatment of patients with minimal or no scarring can be cost-effective as well, particularly when lower treatment costs are assumed.

February 05, 2015

Taking Immunosuppressives, Anti-Cancer Drugs May Reactivate Hepatitis B

Individuals previously infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) who receive chemotherapy or immunosuppressive treatment may be at risk of reactivating the disease according to a summary of report from the Emerging Trends Conference, “Reactivation of Hepatitis B,” and published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. Reactivation of HBV can be fatal and the study authors suggest routine screening of HBV in all patients prior to the start of treatment with immunosuppressives or anti-cancer drugs.

December 18, 2014

What Can Be Done to Prevent Hepatitis C Patients from Being Lost in the Healthcare System?

A new study shows that many patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are lost during different stages of health care to manage the disease. This real-life’ view of the HCV patient care continuum in a major U.S. urban area is published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, and highlights the importance of generating awareness among clinicians and at-risk groups about appropriate HCV testing, referral, support and care.

November 06, 2014

Hepatitis A Hospitalization Rate Declines in U.S.

New research reports that the rate of hospitalization due to hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection has significantly declined in the U.S. from 2002 to 2011. Findings published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, show that older patients and those with chronic liver disease are most likely to be hospitalized for HAV. Vaccination of adults with chronic liver disease may prevent infection with hepatitis A and the need for hospitalization.

October 09, 2014

Drinking Decaf Coffee May Be Good for the Liver

Researchers from the National Cancer Institute report that decaffeinated coffee drinking may benefit liver health. Results of the study published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, show that higher coffee consumption, regardless of caffeine content, was linked to lower levels of abnormal liver enzymes. This suggests that chemical compounds in coffee other than caffeine may help protect the liver.

September 03, 2014

Liver Injury Caused by Herbals, Dietary Supplements Rises in Study Population

New research shows that liver injury caused by herbals and dietary supplements increased from 7% to 20% in a U.S. study group over a ten-year period. According to the study published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, liver injury caused by non-bodybuilding supplements is most severe, occurring more often in middle-aged women and more frequently resulting in death or the need for transplantation than liver injury from bodybuilding supplements or conventional medications.

 

12:00 AM EDT July 28, 2014

Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 is Most Prevalent Worldwide

In one of the largest prevalence studies to date, researchers from the U.K. provide national, regional, and global genotype prevalence estimates for the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Findings published in Hepatology,a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, indicate that genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide, with over 83 million patients infected of which one-third reside in East Asia. Genotype 3, at just over 54 million cases, is the next most prevalent, followed by genotypes 2, 4, 6, and 5.

May 06, 2014

Snacking Contributes to Fatty Liver and Abdominal Obesity

Researchers from The Netherlands found that snacking on high-fat and high-sugar foods was independently associated with abdominal fat and fatty liver (hepatic steatosis).   According to the study published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, hypercaloric diet with frequent meals increases intrahepatic triglyceride content (IHTG) and fat around the waist, but increasing meal size did not. 

April 02, 2014

Coffee Consumption Reduces Mortality Risk from Liver Cirrhosis

New research reveals that consuming two or more cups of coffee each day reduces the risk of death from liver cirrhosis by 66%, specifically cirrhosis caused by non-viral hepatitis. Findings in Hepatology, a journal published by Wiley on behalf of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, show that tea, fruit juice, and soft drink consumption are not linked to cirrhosis mortality risk. As with previous studies heavy alcohol use was found to increase risk of death from cirrhosis.

February 25, 2014

Glycerol Phenylbutyrate Reduces Hepatic Encephalopathy Events and Ammonia Levels Compared to Placebo in a Phase 2 Trial

Phase 2 trial results published in the March issue of Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, suggests the potential for Glycerol Phenylbutyrate (GPB) to reduce hepatic encephalopathy episodes in patients with cirrhosis, with a safety profile similar to placebo.

January 15, 2014

Monitoring Inactive Hepatitis B Patients is Cost-Effective Strategy for Shanghai

A novel study determined that monitoring inactive chronic hepatitis B (HBV) carriers is a cost-effective strategy for China. However, results published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, show that increasing treatment, monitoring and adherence to therapy are necessary to achieve significant health benefits at the population level.

January 09, 2014

Novel Potential Approach to Prevent Infection in Patients with Liver Failure

Findings published in the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases journal, Hepatology, indicate that infection, the commonest cause of mortality in patients with acute liver failure (ALF), may be decreased by inhibiting the activity of a protein found in saliva called SLPI (secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor). New research has found that this protein, produced by the body in response to injury, plays a vital role in patients with ALF.

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