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12:00 AM EDT June 09, 2014

Iron Supplements Improve Anemia, Quality of Life for Women with Heavy Periods

A study by researchers from Finland found that diagnosis and treatment of anemia is importanat to improve quality of life among women with heavy periods.  Findings published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, suggest clinicians screen for anemia and recommend iron supplementation to women with heavy menstrual bleeding  (menorrhagia).

12:00 AM EST January 30, 2014

Having a Baby after Fertility Issues Improves Couples Chances of Staying Together

New reseach reveals that women who have a child after experiencing fertility problems are more likely to remain with their partner following infertility evaluations. Findings in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal published by Wiley on behalf of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, indicate that after 12 years of follow-up, nearly 27% of women were no longer living with the partner, which they had at the time of fertility evaluation, if they did not have a child.

12:05 AM EST November 18, 2013

Human Error Most Common Cause of Birth Asphyxia

Findings from a 15-year study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, indicate that human error is the most common cause of infant asphyxiation at birth.

12:00 AM EDT October 15, 2013

1 in 10 Women Drink a Little Alcohol While Pregnant

Researchers in Norway found that negative affectivity is linked to light alcohol use and binge drinking during pregnancy. Results published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, show 16% of women had light alcohol use in the first trimester and 10% in the second trimester. Binge drinking occurred in 12% of women during their first trimester and 0.5% in the second trimester.

12:00 AM EDT September 09, 2013

Is Bigger Really Better When it Comes to Size of Labor Wards?

New research reveals that large labor wards—those handling 3,000 to 3,999 deliveries annually—have better overall approval rates compared to small, intermediate or very large obstetric units. The study, appearing in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal published by Wiley on behalf of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, suggests that greater access to in-house obstetricians and auxiliary specialists contributes to the lower obstetric injury claims from patients at large labor wards in Denmark.

June 26, 2013

Preventative Measures in Mom’s Third Trimester May Avert Anemia in Newborns

Swedish researchers determined that administering anti-D antibodies (immunoglobulins) to pregnant women who were Rhesus D (RhD) negative could prevent hemolytic disease in the infant. Findings published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, indicate that providing anti-D prophylaxis to mothers without the anti-D antigen (protein) during the 28-30 week of pregnancy may prevent the Rh blood disorder in newborns.

12:00 AM EDT April 11, 2013

Endometriosis Treatments Lower Ovarian Cancer Risk

A novel study shows women who undergo surgical treatment for endometriosis have a lower risk of developing ovarian cancer. According to results published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, hormonal treatments for endometriosis did not lower ovarian cancer risk.

March 05, 2013

Heavy Moms-to-Be at Greater Risk of C-Section

Researchers from Norway found that women with a pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) of 40 had an increased risk of vacuum extraction delivery or Cesarean section (C-section). Findings that appear in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal published by Wiley on behalf of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, indicate that women with more than a 16 kg (30 lbs) weight gain during pregnancy increased their risk of forceps or vacuum extraction, and C-section.

October 09, 2012

Aspirin May Decrease Risk of Aggressive Form of Ovarian Cancer

New research shows that women who regularly use pain relief medications, particularly aspirin, have a decreased risk of serous ovarian cancer—an aggressive carcinoma affecting the surface of the ovary. The study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, reports that non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), paracetamol (acetaminophen), or other analgesics did not decrease ovarian cancer risk.

March 06, 2012

Unnecessary Induction of Labor Increases Risk of Cesarean Section and Other Complications

A new study published in the journal Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica reveals that induction of labor at term in the absence of maternal or fetal indications increases the risk of cesarean section and other postpartum complications for the woman, as well as neonatal complications.

December 13, 2011

Mothers’ Weight Before and During Pregnancy Affects Baby’s Weight

A new study published in the journal Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica (AOGS) reveals that both pre-pregnant weight (body mass index, BMI) and weight gain in pregnancy are important predictors of babies’ birthweight. This is important since high birthweight may also predict adult overweight.

September 21, 2011

Fear of Childbirth Increases Likelihood of C-Section

A new study published in the international journal Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica (AOGS) reveals that fear of childbirth is a predisposing factor for emergency and elective cesarean sections, even after psychological counseling.

June 20, 2011

Inducing Labor is Not Associated with Higher Rates of Cesarean Sections

A new study published in the international Nordic journal Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica (AOGS) reveals that inducing labor in the weeks around term, or from week 39 to week 41, is not connected with higher rates of cesarean section compared with waiting for a later spontaneous or induced labor.

April 06, 2011

Women with congenital heart disease are more likely to have been born preterm and small, and these outcomes are repeated in the next generation

A survey of women born in Sweden has revealed three significant links between being born prematurely and having an inborn heart defect, what doctors call congenital heart disease (CHD). First, women with CHD were more likely to have been born preterm or small-for-gestational age (SGA) than women without CHD. Secondly, when women with CHD have children, their babies are more likely to have a congenital malformation than children of unaffected women. They are also more prone to give birth to children preterm or SGA and their babies are more often delivered by cesarean section. And thirdly, mothers of women with CHD were more often single/unmarried or older than mothers whose children did not have heart disease. These findings were published today in AOGS (Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica), the Nordic journal of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive health.