Environment & Sustainability

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November 16, 2015

Insights into the Evolution of Praying Mantis Camouflage

New research reveals that two different evolutionary shifts toward camouflage investment occurred in the charismatic horned praying mantises. The most recent shift in increased accumulation of numerous cryptic features occurred only after the re-evolution of important leg lobes that help disguise the appearance of the mantis from predators.

November 16, 2015

Long-Term Effects of Common Pesticides on Aquatic Species

New research indicates that commonly-used insecticide mixtures continue to impact aquatic invertebrate species over multiple weeks, even when the chemicals are no longer detectable in water.

November 09, 2015

Could Solar Eclipses Disrupt Electricity in Germany?

Could a solar eclipse over Europe during the day affect the power generated by Germany’s photovoltaic systems or solar panels, thereby challenging the reliability of the electrical supply across the country?

November 02, 2015

Fireworks Are Fun but Can Reduce Atmospheric Visibility

To some, holidays such as Bastille Day, Independence Day, and New Year’s Eve, as well as major sporting events, wouldn’t be the same without fireworks. But in a new Weather article, Dr. Francis Pope and his colleagues highlight the negative effects of fireworks on visibility and short-term air quality.

November 02, 2015

Researchers Provide Detailed Genetic Information on Fish Commonly Used in Environmental Toxicology Studies

The fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) has long been a premier animal model for research and regulation related to environmental toxins. Unfortunately, however, genetic information about this species is incomplete. The lack of genome sequence information for the species has limited scientists’ ability to dissect complex traits, evaluate genetic markers, identify gene regulatory sequences, and elucidate biological pathways.

October 19, 2015

How Wind Might Impact Birds’ Migration Routes

For centuries, scientists have been working to unravel the many mysteries of bird migration, studying where birds go, how they find their way, and how much of the information they need is inherited and how much is learned.

October 19, 2015

Wind Turbines May Reduce Breeding Success of White-Tailed Eagles

While renewable energy sources such as wind power will play an increasingly important role in climate change mitigation, new research reveals that the breeding success of species such as the white-tailed eagle can be significantly reduced by wind power generation on a large scale, possibly due to collision mortality.

October 05, 2015

Cryptic Invasions by Ecological Engineers Conceal Profound Changes in Nature

A new study reveals that the salt marsh plant Spartina alterniflora, which grows on more than 9,000 km of the Atlantic coastline of South America, is not native to the area and was in fact introduced 200 years ago.

September 24, 2015

Wiley Launches Journal to Help Solve World Challenges

John Wiley and Sons, Inc., today announced the launch of Global Challenges, a new open access journal devoted to creating a global community to address major challenges the world faces. Global challenges such as climate change, energy scarcity, health and nutrition security, pandemic disease, and access to sufficient water resources are a priority for every government and critical for their citizens. Addressing such challenges in a sustainable manner requires strategic research investments, international collaboration, collective resources and knowledge exchange between diverse communities.

12:00 AM EDT September 24, 2015

Researchers Find Ticks Linked with Lyme Disease in South London Parks

Visitors to 2 popular parks in South London are at risk of coming into contact with ticks that can transmit Lyme disease to humans, according to a new study in Medical and Veterinary Entomology.

September 08, 2015

Ozone Can Reduce a Flower’s Scent that’s Critical for Attracting Pollinators

New research shows that high levels of ozone, which are predicted to increase in the atmosphere in the future, can dampen the scents of flowers that attract bees and other pollinators.

August 25, 2015

Study in Bats and Rodents Offers Insights on How Viruses Spread Across Species

Bats are natural reservoirs of several important emerging viruses, and because cross-species transmission appears to be quite common among bats, it’s important to study bats in a community context rather than concentrating on individual species.

August 17, 2015

The Dynamics of Mercury Toxins in the Oceans’ Food Web

Methylmercury, a toxic form of mercury that is readily absorbed from the gastro-intestinal tract and can cause in a variety of health issues, poses a significant threat to marine animals at the top of the food web. A new study confirms that Artic species of these animals have higher concentrations of methylmercury in their tissues compared with animals lower in the food web; however, it also shows similar trends in selenium, which could help play a protective role against the toxic effects of mercury.

August 17, 2015

What Will it Take to Save the Bees?

Studies have unequivocally shown a consistent decline in bee populations over the last decade, and experts are diligently working to find ways to reverse the trend. But is it too late to save our bees, which are responsible for pollinating a staggering 150 different crop plants, and our bee-dependent lifestyle?

August 03, 2015

Low Levels of Endocrine Disruptors in the Environment May Cause Sex Reversal in Female Frogs

Many studies have been conducted on the dangers of endocrine disrupting chemicals that mimic or block estrogen, the primary female hormone. Now new research shows that similar harm can be done by chemicals that affect male hormones, or androgens.

12:00 AM EDT July 24, 2015

Stadium Lighting Affects Bat Behavior and May Threaten Biodiversity

A new Animal Conservation study shows that sports stadium lighting can alter patterns of bat species activity and feeding, which may in turn have cascading effects on other organisms and the ecosystem as a whole.

July 20, 2015

Drugs in Wastewater Contaminate Drinking Water

Both prescription and illegal drugs that are abused have been found in Canadian surface waters. New research shows that wastewater discharges flowing downstream have the potential to contaminate sources of drinking water with these drugs at relatively low concentrations.

July 20, 2015

Researchers Examine Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Almond Production

California-grown almonds dominate the global market, providing over 80% of the world’s commercial almonds. Two new articles published in the Journal of Industrial Ecology examine the environmental impacts of California’s almond production, focusing on greenhouse gas emissions and energy.

July 20, 2015

Study Sheds Light on the Ability of Different Marine Species to Respond to Climate Warming

In Eastern Australia, the ocean has been warming at a rate that’s 4-times that of the global average. Many marine species have been appearing further south than they ever have before, while others have stayed put. A new study identifies which characteristics seem to be important for species to shift their ranges so quickly

July 06, 2015

Cactus Scientists Offer Insights to Solve Future Global Agricultural Challenges

Researchers have provided a new roadmap for tackling future agricultural production issues by using solutions that involve crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), a specialized type of photosynthesis that enhances the efficiency by which plants use water.