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12:00 AM EDT May 20, 2015

British Invasion of the Harlequin Ladybird Threatens Other Species

The harlequin ladybird, officially known as Harmonia axyridis, was widely introduced across continental Europe as a way to limit the population of small sap-sucking insects called aphids. While it was never intentionally introduced into Britain, H. axyridis was discovered there in 2003, and people across the region have been tracking its spread since 2005.

12:00 AM EDT May 20, 2015

Offshore Wind Turbine Construction Could Be Putting Seals' Hearing at Risk

Noise from pile driving during offshore wind turbine construction could be damaging the hearing of harbour seals around the UK, according to ecologists who attached GPS data loggers to 24 harbor seals while offshore wind turbines were being installed in 2012. Data on the seals' locations and their diving behaviour was combined with information from the wind farm developers on when pile driving was taking place. Models revealed that half of the tagged seals were exposed to noise levels that exceeded hearing damage thresholds.

May 18, 2015

How Harmful Male Genitalia Can Impact Reproduction in other Species

Male Callosobruchus chinensis seed beetles have spines on their genitalia, which increase their fertilization success but injure a female’s reproductive tract—especially a female of a related species called Callosobruchus maculatus.

May 18, 2015

Living in Social Groups May Lessen the Impacts of a Chronic Illness in Wild Animals

Living in a social group has many benefits for wildlife but is often assumed to come at the cost of increased disease risk. However, new research on the effects of mange on gray wolves in Yellowstone National Park reveals that infection risk does not appear to increase with the size of the pack. Also, while solitary wolves with mange had a 5-times higher death rate compared with solitary healthy wolves, infected wolves surrounded by five or more healthy pack-mates survived just as well as uninfected wolves. In addition, while the mortality rates of infected wolves increased as more wolves in their pack were also infected, both uninfected and infected wolves still accrued a net survival benefit from living in a social group.

May 18, 2015

Plant Dispersal Insights May Aid Climate Change Predictions

Explanations for why the same plant groups occur in Australia, New Zealand, and South America have been deeply controversial. By comparing broad patterns of climatic history to age and habitat information for more than 70 plant taxa, or groups, investigators have provided important new insights.

May 18, 2015

The Extent of Toxin Accumulation in Birds Off the Coast of Canada

Toxins known as perfluoroalkyl substances have become virtually ubiquitous throughout the environment, and various national and international voluntary phase-outs and restrictions on these compounds have been implemented over the last 10 to 15 years.

May 12, 2015

How the Presence of Conservation Researchers Affects Wildlife

In a study that compared three sites within the Dja Conservation Complex in Cameroon, Africa, investigators found that the presence of a conservation research project acts as a deterrent to chimpanzee and gorilla poachers, and community awareness and involvement in research lead to an increased value of apes and intact forests to local people, thus limiting hunting practices.

May 04, 2015

Lab Test Commonly Used to Assess Water Toxicity May Not Predict Effects on Field Populations

Hyalella azteca are invertebrates that are widely used for sediment and water toxicity studies. Investigators have found that H. azteca collected from sites influenced by agricultural/urban runoff are as much as 2-times less sensitive to pyrethroid insecticides than lab-grown H. azteca. In contrast, the insecticide sensitivities of H. azteca collected from undeveloped sites beyond the influences of agricultural/urban runoff were similar to those of lab-grown populations.

April 07, 2015

Which Type of Sustainable Rooftop Technology is Best in Cold Climates?

Sustainable rooftop technologies—including green roofs, white roofs, and solar photovoltaic panels—can provide great environmental benefits, but studies of these technologies often look only at their use in hot climates and do not assess their full environmental consequences.

March 16, 2015

The Dangers of Reintroducing Lions and Other Carnivores for Ecotourism

Ecotourism has motivated efforts to reintroduce lions to landscapes where they were not previously common. A new analysis conducted after 4 lions were reintroduced into the fenced Tembe Elephant Park, South Africa, reveals that lions might compete with humans in winter, spring, and autumn and with endemic herbivores in all seasons but winter.

March 16, 2015

Will Future Population Growth Be Limited by Freshwater Availability?

The global human population is growing faster than the water supply. Investigators recently analyzed various models and trends to assess both optimistic and pessimistic projections of future water use and shortages.

March 02, 2015

Human Activity May Be Supporting Growth of Harmful Algae in Lakes

Intensified land-use, sewage discharge, and climate change have likely favored disproportionate development of harmful algae in freshwaters. A new study found that blooms of one type of harmful algae, called cyanobacteria, have increased disproportionately over the past two centuries relative to other species, with the greatest increases since 1945.

March 02, 2015

New York City Climate Change Report Calls for More Research and Planning Efforts

A new report provides projections of New York City’s climate to the end of the century, noting that higher temperatures, heavy downpours, sea level rise, and intensified coastal flooding are the major climate hazards expected for the region.

February 24, 2015

Wiley Receives Nine Prestigious PROSE Awards

Hoboken, NEW JERSEY- February 20, 2015    John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (NYSE: JWa and JWb), a global knowledge-based services provider, is honored to be the recipient of nine PROSE Awards for 2015.  The PROSE Awards recognize excellence in professional and scholarly publishing by highlighting distinguished books, journals and electronic content. 

February 17, 2015

Urbanization May Affect the Initiation of Thunderstorms

A study that assessed the impact of urban land use on the initiation of thunderstorms from 1997 to 2013 in the humid subtropical region of the southeast United States found that so-called isolated convective initiation events occur more often over the urban area of Atlanta compared with its surrounding rural counterparts. The findings confirm that human-induced changes in land cover in tropical environments lead to more thunderstorm initiation events.

February 02, 2015

Oceans' Increasing Mercury Levels May Be Harming Fish

Mercury contamination of ocean fish is a serious global health issue, and a new analysis of published reports reveals that the concentration of mercury in yellowfin tuna caught near Hawai’i is increasing at a rate ≥ 3.8 % per year.

January 20, 2015

Public Attitude Toward Tiger Farming and Tiger Conservation

The wild tiger Panthera tigris is considered critically endangered, and it faces unprecedented threats, including habitat loss and fragmentation, depletion of prey, and continued illegal poaching for trade of tiger bones for traditional medicine and skins for ornamentation and collection.

November 13, 2014

Ocean Carbon Uptake More Variable than Thought

The Earth's oceans are thought to have taken up about one quarter of the carbon dioxide (CO2) that humans pumped into the atmosphere in the past 2 decades. While this drives acidification and has consequences for sea life, it also moderates the rate of climate change.

November 07, 2014

Marin Katusa Explores How the Global Energy Trade Slipped from America's Grasp

In The Colder War, analyst Marin Katusa makes the case that Putin is exploiting Russia’s new role as the world’s leading energy supplier (the country exports more oil than the UAE, Kuwait and Iraq combined; has world’s largest natural gas reserves; and is the top uranium exporter) to strong-arm governments and reassert its global importance.

October 20, 2014

Moving Beyond Carbon Sequestration May Improve the Planet’s Health

Managing carbon flow into the atmosphere has been a central focus of efforts aimed at protecting the planet and addressing climate change. A new European Journal of Soil Science review proposes that we focus less on sequestering carbon to mitigate CO2 buildup and more on using wisely the energy it carries.

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