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July 06, 2015

Beetle Tree of Life Reveals the Evolutionary History of Earth's Most Diverse Group of Animals

New research reconstructs the beetle family tree and shows how this important group of insects diversified and otherwise flourished over the last nearly 300 million years.

July 06, 2015

How Ticks that Carry Lyme Disease Are Spreading to New Regions in the U.S.

Lyme disease is currently estimated to affect 300,000 people in the U.S. every year, and blacklegged ticks, the disease’s main vector, have recently flourished in areas previously thought to be devoid of this arachnid.

July 06, 2015

Investigators Insert Large DNA Sequence into Mammalian Cells

For the first time, researchers have used a simplified technique derived from a defense mechanism evolved by bacteria and other single-celled organisms to successfully insert a large DNA sequence into a predetermined genomic site in mammalian cells.

July 06, 2015

Societal Challenges and New Treatments for Ebola Virus Disease

 In a new Journal of Internal Medicine review, Dr. Ali Mirazimi of the Karolinska Institutet considers why the latest outbreak occurred

June 30, 2015

Wiley partnership with figshare enables data sharing

Hoboken, NJ – June 30, 2015 – John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (NYSE: JWa and JWb), today announced their partnership with London- based data repository organization, Figshare. To support authors who wish to openly share their data, Wiley have embarked on this partnership with Figshare to integrate data sharing within existing journal workflows and article publication.

June 15, 2015

How an Animal’s Biochemistry May Support Aggressive Behavior

Researchers who paired Siamese fighting fish in mock fights found that winning fish could supply more energy to their muscles during fights than losing fish.

June 15, 2015

Research Reveals Insights on How Ancient Reptiles Adapted to Life in Water

The world’s first study into the brain anatomy of a marine reptile that lived at the same time as the dinosaurs sheds light on how the reptilian brain adapted to life in the oceans.

12:00 AM EDT June 03, 2015

The Early Bird Catches the Sperm

Ecologists from the United States and Germany have discovered that compared with early birds, late risers are more likely to be cuckolded, meaning that they unknowingly end up raising young in their nest that had been fathered by another male.

June 01, 2015

Warmer Climates May Increase Pesticides’ Toxicity in Fish

In a study of the effects of increasing climate temperatures on the toxicity of 3 contaminants in different fish species, researchers found that all pesticides and industrial contaminants studied—endosulfan, chlorpyrifos, and phenol—became toxic in the upper 5oC range of species’ temperature tolerance.

12:00 AM EDT May 22, 2015

More than Two Dozen Articles Provide Insights on Mummies

In a special issue, The Anatomical Record ventures into the world of human mummified remains. In 26 articles, the anatomy of mummies is exquisitely detailed through cutting edge examination, while they are put in historical, archeological, and cultural context. Investigators even take on the thorny issue of ethics as it applies to human remains in general and to the specific case of mummy research.

12:00 AM EDT May 20, 2015

British Invasion of the Harlequin Ladybird Threatens Other Species

The harlequin ladybird, officially known as Harmonia axyridis, was widely introduced across continental Europe as a way to limit the population of small sap-sucking insects called aphids. While it was never intentionally introduced into Britain, H. axyridis was discovered there in 2003, and people across the region have been tracking its spread since 2005.

May 18, 2015

How Harmful Male Genitalia Can Impact Reproduction in other Species

Male Callosobruchus chinensis seed beetles have spines on their genitalia, which increase their fertilization success but injure a female’s reproductive tract—especially a female of a related species called Callosobruchus maculatus.

May 18, 2015

Living in Social Groups May Lessen the Impacts of a Chronic Illness in Wild Animals

Living in a social group has many benefits for wildlife but is often assumed to come at the cost of increased disease risk. However, new research on the effects of mange on gray wolves in Yellowstone National Park reveals that infection risk does not appear to increase with the size of the pack. Also, while solitary wolves with mange had a 5-times higher death rate compared with solitary healthy wolves, infected wolves surrounded by five or more healthy pack-mates survived just as well as uninfected wolves. In addition, while the mortality rates of infected wolves increased as more wolves in their pack were also infected, both uninfected and infected wolves still accrued a net survival benefit from living in a social group.

May 18, 2015

Plant Dispersal Insights May Aid Climate Change Predictions

Explanations for why the same plant groups occur in Australia, New Zealand, and South America have been deeply controversial. By comparing broad patterns of climatic history to age and habitat information for more than 70 plant taxa, or groups, investigators have provided important new insights.

May 18, 2015

The Extent of Toxin Accumulation in Birds Off the Coast of Canada

Toxins known as perfluoroalkyl substances have become virtually ubiquitous throughout the environment, and various national and international voluntary phase-outs and restrictions on these compounds have been implemented over the last 10 to 15 years.

May 07, 2015

Researcher Glen Wright to take over Wiley’s Exchanges Blog

John Wiley & Sons, Inc., is pleased to welcome Glen Wright, a research fellow at the Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations (IDDRI) in Paris, as the first guest editor of Wiley’s Exchanges blog. For one week, starting May 11, 2015, he will take over the blog’s reins to explore “The PhD Path Less Travelled.”

April 20, 2015

Addressing the Needs of Young Women with Disorders of Sex Development

Disorders of sex development are lifelong conditions that are usually diagnosed at birth or during adolescence. In a recent study of 13 teenaged girls with disorders of sex development, the girls were guarded and reticent about sharing personal information about their disorder during adolescence, but some of them learned to engage in conversations with more confidence as they moved towards adulthood.

April 20, 2015

Darwin Convinced the World, But Was He the First to Describe Evolution?

A new review of the ideas and work of Patrick Matthew, a little-known antecedent of Charles Darwin, argues that Matthew is under-appreciated even though he described the idea of large-scale evolution by natural selection decades before Darwin did. Some of his ideas were different from Darwin’s but are equally valid.

April 20, 2015

Research Highlights the Importance of “Self-DNA” for Maintaining Diversity among Species

In natural plant communities, diversity is maintained by limits set on each plant by itself. This involves a detrimental effect of self-DNA (DNA from the same species released during decomposition) on the plant’s and its offspring’s growth. New research finds that this process not only regulates plant populations but may also be generalized to a range of additional organisms including algae, protozoa, fungi, and animals.

April 10, 2015

New Clinical Platform May Accelerate Discovery of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Agents

Researchers at University of British Columbia have developed a new technology that enables rapid discovery of aptamers, one of the fastest growing classes of diagnostic and therapeutic agents. Aptamers are short sequences of genetic material that fold into precise 3-D structures that bind target molecules and inhibit their biological functions.

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