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September 20, 2016

Plant Diversity Alleviates the Effects of Flooding on Crops

In grasslands, growing plants in higher diversity fields may help alleviate the negative impacts of flooding. This finding may extend to how we grow important food crops. 

September 19, 2016

Experience with Vehicles Does Not Help Birds Avoid Collisions

Researchers suspected that experience with passing vehicles may cause birds to adjust their avoidance responses—specifically, to increase their flight initiation distances—to keep from being hit. Instead, though, they recently found that inexperienced birds have longer flight initiation distances in response to oncoming vehicles than birds that have repeatedly observed passing, fast-moving vehicles.

September 19, 2016

Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Accident

A new article provides an overview of the impacts of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Station accident in Japan in 2011 and subsequent remediation measures, comparing similarities and differences with the lessons learned from the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident in Ukraine.

September 19, 2016

Research Provides New Insights on the Impact of Wild Birds’ Social Networks

New research looks into how social networks among wild great tits, as they forage in flocks during the winter, carry over into shaping the set locations at which the birds breed and raise their young during the spring.

 

September 06, 2016

Corporate social responsibility can backfire if employees don’t think it’s genuine

A new study looks at what happens when a company’s employees view its efforts related to corporate social responsibility as substantive (perceived to be other-serving and genuinely aimed at supporting the common good) or symbolic (perceived as self-serving and performed primarily for reputation and to enhance profits). 

September 06, 2016

Dam removal projects accelerate, but research lags behind

A new review reveals gaps in the science of dam removal. Although more than 1200 dams have been removed in the United States, fewer than 10 percent have been scientifically evaluated. Those studies that do exist focus more on short-term river channel responses rather than longer-term biological responses.

September 06, 2016

Has the affordable care act accomplished its goals?

A new review of the published literature indicates that the Affordable Care Act has made significant progress in accomplishing two of its main goals—decreasing the number of uninsured and improving access to care.

September 06, 2016

Screening for suicidal thoughts and behaviors declines with patient age

In a recent analysis of patient charts from eight different emergency departments, documented screening for self-harm, suicide ideation, or suicide attempts declined with age, from approximately 81 percent in younger age groups to a low of 68 percent among those aged ≥85 years.

 

August 31, 2016

Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel May Contain Hidden Symbols of Female Anatomy

Publications on the works of Michelangelo in the Sistine Chapel indicate that numerous codes and hidden messages may have been inserted for various purposes. Now a new analysis suggests that Michelangelo may have concealed symbols associated with female anatomy when painting the chapel’s ceiling. 

August 29, 2016

New Research Sheds Light on How Aged Wine Gets its Aroma

Researchers have discovered an enzyme that plays a leading role in the formation of compounds that give aged wines their sought-after aroma.

August 18, 2016

How Did the Phosphate Get into RNA? Urea as one of the essential components in Darwin's "warm little pond"

The phosphate ion is almost insoluble and is one of the most inactive of Earth's most abundant phosphate minerals. So how could phosphate have originally been incorporated into ribonucleotides, the building blocks of RNA, which are considered to be among the earliest constituents of life? American and Spanish scientists have now identified reasonable conditions to mobilize phosphate from insoluble apatite minerals for prebiotic organophosphate synthesis, including ribonucleotides. The pivotal role of urea in this process is also described in their article in the journal Angewandte Chemie.

August 11, 2016

American Geophysical Union Partners with Wiley to Take On New Geohealth Initiative

Largest Earth and Space Science Organization and Publishing Partner Wiley to Launch New Open Access Journal

WASHINGTON, DC—9 August 2016—Geohealth is a rapidly emerging transdisciplinary field that supports the intersection of Earth and environmental sciences with human, agricultural, and environmental health. As a first step in its efforts to support and enable this emerging field, the American Geophysical Union (AGU) announced today the launch of its newest journal, GeoHealth.

 

August 09, 2016

Wiley to publish Molecular Oncology – bringing together all four journals from the Federation of European Biochemical Societies at FEBS Press

Hoboken, NEW JERSEY – 9 August 2016 – John Wiley & Sons, Inc., today announced the final step of an extended publishing partnership with the Federation of European Biochemical Societies (FEBS) with the move of Molecular Oncology from January 2017 to join the other three FEBS publications published by Wiley; The FEBS Journal, FEBS Letters, and FEBS Open Bioat FEBS Press. FEBS has become one of Europe’s largest organisations in the molecular life sciences, providing a voice to a large part of the academic research and teaching community in Europe.   

August 01, 2016

Heating the exterior of suitcases may decrease the spread of bed bugs through luggage

New research indicates that brief heat treatment is a promising way to decrease the spread of bed bugs being transported on the outer surface of luggage.

July 28, 2016

New Rare Species of Whale Identified

Researchers have identified a new rare species of beaked whale with a range in the remote North Pacific Ocean. 

July 25, 2016

Sibling competition helped guide dispersal in pre-industrial populations

Researchers who examined family genealogies from Finland found that the presence of same-sex elder siblings increased the probability that people would disperse to new lands, whereas having opposite-sex siblings had less influence.

July 18, 2016

Research examines how to optimize nanoparticles for efficient drug delivery

Nanoparticles are being studied as drug delivery systems to treat a wide variety of diseases. New research delves into the physical properties of nanoparticles that are important for successfully delivering therapeutics within the body, with a primary focus on size. This is especially important as relatively subtle differences in size can affect cell uptake and determine the fate of nanoparticles once within cells.

July 13, 2016

Genetic Tests with the Naked Eye: Replication of enzyme-nucleotide chimeras

DNA polymerases are the “Xerox machines” that replicate our DNA. They must work with great precision to keep errors from creeping into our genes. In spite of this precision, they still accept building blocks that have been coupled to large proteins, as a group of German scientists reports in the journal Angewandte Chemie. Based on this fact, the team has developed detection systems for genotyping DNA and RNA that can be evaluated by the naked eye. This method may allow for new diagnostic tools for use in the field.

July 12, 2016

Counting Red Blood Cells: Electrochemical determination of the concentration and peroxidase activity of erythrocytes

Blood counts are routinely carried out before operations, in cases of infection, or when testing for a variety of diseases, such as anemia and leukemia. A key value in this test is the number of red blood cells (erythrocytes). Scientists at the University of Oxford (UK) have now introduced a simple nano-electrochemical process for the rapid, precise determination of the erythrocyte count. As described in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the test also determines the activity of individual erythrocytes toward hydrogen peroxide.

July 01, 2016

Understanding Tourists’ Preferences for Nature-Based Experiences May Help with Conservation

Charismatic species—such as felines and primates or whales, sharks, and turtles—are attractive to tourists, and the opportunity of seeing them in the wild motivates tourists to visit protected areas. New research indicates that tourists’ preferences are not restricted to charismatic species, however, and they extend to less charismatic biodiversity, as well as to landscapes. 

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