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December 15, 2014

Do Crows Have an Impact on the Population of their Prey?

They steal, raid nests, and keep the company of witches, but the unpopular crow may not be as big a menace as people think. A new Ibis study has found that crows—along with their avian cousins the magpie and the raven—have surprisingly little impact on the abundance of other bird species.

December 15, 2014

How Blood Parasites Colonize and Persist in Small Island Bird Populations

A new study highlights the complex factors at play for parasites that infect animal populations residing on small islands. The findings are important for understanding colonization and extinction as drivers of island biogeography.

December 15, 2014

How Trap-Flowers Attract and Deceive Pollinating Food Thieves

Researchers have discovered a new pollination system that involves food-thieving flies as pollinators. These flies feed on insect secretions, available when a spider, a praying mantis, or other predatory arthropods feed on insects. The plant mimics compounds released from freshly killed insects to deceive flies that are in search of food.

December 11, 2014

Leading Nursing Journal Publishes Protocols for Managing Obstetric Emergencies

Maternal mortality, or the death of a woman during pregnancy, at birth, or soon after birth, has been on the rise in the United States since the 1990s. Data suggest that over 50% of these deaths are preventable. One prevention strategy is the development and implementation of written protocols for obstetric emergency situations.

 

December 01, 2014

How Terrorist Attack Survivors View their Interactions with the Media

Among survivors of the 2011 Utøya Island terrorist attack in Norway, most perceived contact with media as a positive experience. Among those who allowed themselves to be interviewed by the media, 13% found the experience distressing and 11% regretted participating.

November 13, 2014

New Findings Could Help Keep Satellites and Space Debris from Colliding

Half a million objects, including debris, satellites, and the International Space Station, orbit the planet in the thermosphere, the largest layer of Earth’s atmosphere. To predict the orbits—and potential collisions—of all this stuff, scientists must forecast the weather in the thermosphere.

October 06, 2014

Invading Crabs Could Threaten Life in the Antarctic

Life on the Antarctic sea floor is under threat from crabs that could invade the area thanks to favorable conditions as a result of global warming, researchers warn.

October 06, 2014

Offspring Can Inherit Traits of Mom’s Previous Mate

Experiments in flies indicate that offspring can inherit an acquired characteristic of their mother's previous mate.

September 15, 2014

How Are Hybridized Species Affecting Wildlife?

Researchers who transplanted combinations of wild, domesticated, and domesticated-wild hybridized populations of a fish species to new environments found that within 5 to 11 generations, selection could remove introduced foreign genes from wild populations that hybridized with domesticated populations.

September 15, 2014

How a change in slope affects lava flows

As soon as lava flows from a volcano, exposure to air and wind causes it to start to cool and harden. Rather than hardening evenly, the energy exchange tends to take place primarily at the surface. The cooling causes a crust to form on the outer edges of the lava flow, insulating the molten lava within. This hardened lava shell allows a lava flow to travel much further than it would otherwise, while cracks in the lava’s crust can cause it to draw up short.

September 15, 2014

If Hippopotamuses Can’t Swim, How Can Some Be Living on Islands?

There is no published account where hippopotamuses are demonstrably shown swimming or floating at the surface of any body of water. But if they can’t swim, how did they reach and colonize islands?

September 03, 2014

Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography to Publish with Wiley

John Wiley and Sons Inc. announced today its selection by the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) to publish their highly regarded portfolio of journals focused on marine and inland water systems.

September 02, 2014

Aging Gracefully: Diving Seabirds Shed Light on Declines with Age

Scientists who studied long-lived diving birds, which represent valuable models to examine aging in the wild, found that blood oxygen stores, resting metabolism and thyroid hormone levels all declined with age, although diving performance did not. Apparently, physiological changes do occur with age in long-lived species, but they may have no detectable effect on behavioral performance.

September 02, 2014

Oceans Apart: Study Reveals Insights into the Evolution of Languages

A new Journal of Evolutionary Biology study provides evidence that physical barriers formed by oceans can influence language diversification.

August 18, 2014

Butterflies' Evolutionary Responses to Warmer Temperatures May Compromise Their Ability to Adapt to Future Climate Change

Members of the brown argus butterfly species that moved north in response to recent climate change have evolved a narrower diet dependent on wild Geranium plants, UK researchers report. However, butterflies that did not move north have more diverse diets, including plants such as Rockrose that are abundant in southern parts of the UK.  

August 18, 2014

Did an Exceptional Iceberg Sink the Titanic?

While the sinking of the Titanic in 1912 is typically blamed on human, design and construction errors, a new Significance paper points to 2 other unfavorable factors outside human control: there were a greater number of icebergs than normal that year, and weather conditions had driven them further south, and earlier in the year, than was usual.

August 18, 2014

Ebola Has Profound Effects on Wildlife Population Dynamics

New research in gorillas that were affected by an Ebola virus outbreak shows that disease can influence reproductive potential, immigration and social dynamics, and it highlights the need to develop complex models that integrate all the different impacts of a disease.

August 18, 2014

World’s Vegetated Areas Face Threats from Climate Change

Researchers who analyzed the vulnerability of ecosystems to climate change have found that between 10 and 28% of the world’s terrestrial vegetated area can be considered refugia, depending on whether or not wilderness areas are considered. Refugia are areas of biological diversity where natural environmental conditions remain relatively constant during times of great environmental change.

August 13, 2014

Wiley Announces Continued Growth in Titles with Impact Factor

John Wiley & Sons, Inc., today announced a continued increase in the proportion of its journal titles indexed in the 2014 release of Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Reports® (JCR).  A total of 1,202 Wiley titles (approximately 70%) were indexed, up from 1,193 in the 2012 JCR, and including 13 titles which have been indexed for the first time.

August 04, 2014

How should flood risk assessments be done in a changing climate?

Growing consensus on climate and land use change means that it is reasonable to assume, at the very least, that flood levels in a region may change. Then why, ask Rosner et al. in a new study, do the dominant risk assessment techniques used to decide whether to build new flood protection infrastructure nearly always start with an assumption of “no trend” in flood behavior?

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