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December 07, 2016

Plants Engineered to Express a Fruit Fly Gene May Help Clean Up Environmental Pollutant

Through a process called phytoremediation, researchers are using plants to clean up land contaminated with TNT, a toxic environmental pollutant and possible carcinogen. Now a new study shows how a gene found in the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, can be used by Arabidopsis plants to improve TNT removal from contaminated soil.

December 05, 2016

Availability of Human Food Shortens and Disrupts Bears’ Hibernation

With winter approaching, bears all over the world are getting ready to hibernate. New research suggests that not all bears will spend entire winter in their dens, however, especially where baiting and other kinds of bear feeding is performed for hunting purposes and diversion from human settlements.

December 05, 2016

Flowers Use Physics to Attract Pollinators

A new review indicates that flowers may be able to manipulate the laws of physics, by playing with light, using mechanical tricks, and harnessing electrostatic forces to attract pollinators.

December 05, 2016

Plant Scientists Propose New Classification System for European Vegetation

Experts have presented a new classification system for vegetation in Europe that aims to standardize classifications across the continent and aid the European Union Nature Information System, which brings together data for nature resource management and conservation, land planning, education, and environmental policy implementation.

December 05, 2016

Report Reassesses Variations in Global Warming

Experts at the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) have issued a new assessment of temperature trends and variations from the latest available data and analyses. They present evidence that global warming slowed less from 1998 to 2012 than first thought. 

December 05, 2016

Researchers Stress the Need for Research on Ebola Virus Disease in Great Apes

Ebola virus disease (EVD) is a threat to human health, but it also threatens the survival of African great apes. A new review examines the current knowledge about EVD in great apes and documents the link between outbreaks in apes and in humans, mainly via bushmeat consumption.

December 05, 2016

Study Examines the Impact of Climate Change on Freshwater Species

How might climate change affect the distribution of freshwater species living in rivers, ponds, and lakes? Investigators examined the capacity of species to shift their distributions in response to climate change using modeled projections of 527 freshwater species in New South Wales, Australia.

November 28, 2016

Light Switch in Autumn Leaves: Yellow chlorophyll decomposition products are environment-responsive photoswitches

Before trees lose their leaves in the winter, they offer us a bright autumnal display of reds, oranges, and yellows. This results from the decomposition of the compound that makes leaves green: chlorophyll. Among the decomposition products are yellow phyllobilins that demonstrate unusual chemical properties. As reported by Austrian scientists in the journal Angewandte Chemie, these compounds act as four-step molecular “switches” that are triggered by light in different ways depending on the environment.

November 21, 2016

Efforts Are Needed to Protect Native Species from Feral Cats

Feral cats are among the most damaging invasive species worldwide, particularly in Australia where they have caused the extinction of more than 20 mammal species. New work has developed priorities for feral cat research and management, including preventing further extinctions, testing new management tools, and increasing potential for native fauna to coexist with cats.

November 21, 2016

Natural Regeneration May Help Protect Tropical Forests

A new article summarizes the findings of 16 studies that illustrate how natural regeneration of forests, a low-cost alternative to tree planting, can contribute significantly to forest landscape restoration in tropical regions. 

November 21, 2016

Sunlight and Oil Spills May Make Deadly Combination for Wildlife

Contaminants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from oil spills can be toxic to wildlife, especially when in combination with ultraviolet radiation from the sun. New research on species native to the Gulf of Mexico indicates that, compared with oil exposure alone, co-exposure to oil and natural sunlight reduces survival rates of fish that spend time close to the surface in their larval stage.

October 25, 2016

Scientists Root for More Cassava Research to Help Meet Greater Demand for Food

Global food demand is expected to grow by 110 per cent over the next 30 to 35 years, and for many of the poorest people on the planet, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa, cassava is the most important source of calories. Cassava is also important as a crop that is resistant to climate change, but it has not received the same amount of attention as other staple food crops. 

October 20, 2016

Wiley Celebrates the 2016 Nobel Prize Laureates

John Wiley & Sons, Inc., (NYSE: JWa, JWb) would like to acknowledge the laureates honored with the 2016 Nobel Prize. Six of these laureates have had their work published in Wiley’s medical, physiology, chemistry and economics journals and books.

October 13, 2016

Bait Worms Are a Valuable Marine Resource

The humble bait worm wriggling on the hook at the end of angler’s line may be considered a low value resource, but in the first global assessment of its value and impact, researchers have revealed it to be a multi-billion pound global industry worth nearly £6 billion per year. 

October 03, 2016

Community-Level Resources May Affect Residents’ Mental Health following a Natural Disaster

In a study on the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, residents of communities with high unemployment were at elevated risk of disaster-related post-traumatic stress, but only when individuals were assessed 25–28 months post-disaster and not when they were assessed 13–16 months post-disaster.

 

September 20, 2016

Plant Diversity Alleviates the Effects of Flooding on Crops

In grasslands, growing plants in higher diversity fields may help alleviate the negative impacts of flooding. This finding may extend to how we grow important food crops. 

September 19, 2016

Experience with Vehicles Does Not Help Birds Avoid Collisions

Researchers suspected that experience with passing vehicles may cause birds to adjust their avoidance responses—specifically, to increase their flight initiation distances—to keep from being hit. Instead, though, they recently found that inexperienced birds have longer flight initiation distances in response to oncoming vehicles than birds that have repeatedly observed passing, fast-moving vehicles.

September 19, 2016

Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Accident

A new article provides an overview of the impacts of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Station accident in Japan in 2011 and subsequent remediation measures, comparing similarities and differences with the lessons learned from the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident in Ukraine.

September 19, 2016

Research Provides New Insights on the Impact of Wild Birds’ Social Networks

New research looks into how social networks among wild great tits, as they forage in flocks during the winter, carry over into shaping the set locations at which the birds breed and raise their young during the spring.

 

September 06, 2016

Corporate social responsibility can backfire if employees don’t think it’s genuine

A new study looks at what happens when a company’s employees view its efforts related to corporate social responsibility as substantive (perceived to be other-serving and genuinely aimed at supporting the common good) or symbolic (perceived as self-serving and performed primarily for reputation and to enhance profits). 

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