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July 18, 2016

Research examines how to optimize nanoparticles for efficient drug delivery

Nanoparticles are being studied as drug delivery systems to treat a wide variety of diseases. New research delves into the physical properties of nanoparticles that are important for successfully delivering therapeutics within the body, with a primary focus on size. This is especially important as relatively subtle differences in size can affect cell uptake and determine the fate of nanoparticles once within cells.

July 13, 2016

Genetic Tests with the Naked Eye: Replication of enzyme-nucleotide chimeras

DNA polymerases are the “Xerox machines” that replicate our DNA. They must work with great precision to keep errors from creeping into our genes. In spite of this precision, they still accept building blocks that have been coupled to large proteins, as a group of German scientists reports in the journal Angewandte Chemie. Based on this fact, the team has developed detection systems for genotyping DNA and RNA that can be evaluated by the naked eye. This method may allow for new diagnostic tools for use in the field.

July 12, 2016

Counting Red Blood Cells: Electrochemical determination of the concentration and peroxidase activity of erythrocytes

Blood counts are routinely carried out before operations, in cases of infection, or when testing for a variety of diseases, such as anemia and leukemia. A key value in this test is the number of red blood cells (erythrocytes). Scientists at the University of Oxford (UK) have now introduced a simple nano-electrochemical process for the rapid, precise determination of the erythrocyte count. As described in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the test also determines the activity of individual erythrocytes toward hydrogen peroxide.

July 01, 2016

Understanding Tourists’ Preferences for Nature-Based Experiences May Help with Conservation

Charismatic species—such as felines and primates or whales, sharks, and turtles—are attractive to tourists, and the opportunity of seeing them in the wild motivates tourists to visit protected areas. New research indicates that tourists’ preferences are not restricted to charismatic species, however, and they extend to less charismatic biodiversity, as well as to landscapes. 

June 22, 2016

Wiley ChemPlanner Awarded Best of Show at BIO-IT World Conference & Expo

Wiley ChemPlanner was awarded “Best of Show” for the Research & Clinical Data Management category at the BIO-IT World Conference & Expo 2016. Judged by leading industry experts and BIO-IT World editors, this award distinguishes Wiley ChemPlanner as an exceptional innovation in technologies used by life science professionals today.

June 20, 2016

Lizard Tail Adaptations May Reflect Predators’ Color Vision Capabilities

Juveniles of numerous lizard species have a vividly blue-colored tail that likely serves to deflect predator attacks toward the detachable tail rather than the lizard’s body. Now researchers have found that certain differences in blue and UV light reflectance in lizard tails are likely adaptations to predators with different color vision capabilities.

 

June 20, 2016

Wild Boars and Wart Hogs May Have an Internal Compass

New research suggests for the first time that wild boars and wart hogs have an internal magnetic compass that helps them orient themselves as they forage for food and inhabit new areas.

June 19, 2016

Researchers Provide New Insights on Coral Bleaching

Reef-building corals have a symbiotic relationship with Symbiodinium algae, and environmental stressors that cause algae to be expelled from reefs can give rise to the phenomenon known as coral bleaching.

June 09, 2016

Experts Address How to Affirm Both Religious and Sexual Identities in Counselor Accreditation Programs

 

In a recent scholarly exchange of ideas, experts address how the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) honors both religious diversity and sexual orientation diversity in its accrediting practices.

June 06, 2016

Ebola Map May Help Prepare for Future Outbreaks

To be prepared for new Ebola virus disease cases, it is fundamental to start by identifying the range of the virus and the regions that are more favorable for its propagation.

June 06, 2016

New Research on Snakes May Provide Insights on Evolution

Pythons and boas are distantly related, but new research indicates that they have evolved convergent physical characteristics when living in similar habitats—meaning that they evolved similar solutions to similar problems.

June 03, 2016

What Impact Might Brexit Have on UK Agriculture?

With the United Kingdom's referendum on continued membership in the European Union (EU) approaching, experts are considering the impact of a vote to leave (‘Brexit’) on numerous aspects of UK society, including agriculture.

May 16, 2016

Overpasses and Underpasses for Migrating Animals May Reduce Collisions with Automobiles

In the western United States, mule deer and pronghorn (animals that are similar to antelopes) undergo annual migrations that place them and drivers at risk for collisions when the animals cross busy roadways. A new study evaluated overpasses and underpasses as alternative routes for the animals during migration.

May 16, 2016

Why Is Female Sexuality More Flexible than Male Sexuality?

A new evolutionary theory argues that women may have been evolutionarily designed to be sexually fluid—changing their sexual desires and identities from lesbian, to bisexual, to heterosexual and back again—in order to allow them to have sex with their co-wives in polygynous marriages, therefore reducing conflict and tension inherent in such marriages while at the same time successfully reproducing with their husbands in heterosexual unions.

May 05, 2016

Droughts Can Have Detrimental Impacts on Aquatic Invertebrates

At temporary stream sites, researchers found that just three types, or ‘taxa’, of invertebrates remained following a long drought. At sites that experienced shorter dry spells, 24 taxa remained.

May 03, 2016

Birds of a Different Color: Why Some Birds Have More than One Color Type

In some animals, the same species can occur in two or more color types, or morphs. New research may help solve the mystery of how this can occur despite the pressures of evolution.

May 03, 2016

Current Whale Migration Models Are too Simplified

New research challenges the traditional view that baleen whales (Mysticetes) migrate between high-latitude feeding areas and low-latitude breeding areas

May 03, 2016

Experts Propose Strategy to Save Mammals on the Brink of Extinction

With only three living individuals left on this planet, the northern white rhinoceros could be considered doomed for extinction. But now researchers have proposed a road map for preserving such endangered species through techniques that use stem cells and assisted reproduction technology.

May 03, 2016

New Insights on How Oysters Form Shells

Researchers know that several proteins are involved in oyster shell formation, but how expression of these proteins is controlled is not well understood. Now investigators report that they have identified a protein called Pf-POU3F4 that promotes expression of two of these proteins, called Aspein and Prismalin-14.

May 03, 2016

New Research Provides Insights on Seal Species

Conservation and management efforts rely on clear definitions of populations, subspecies, and species. A new study uses digital imaging, state-of-the-art genetic analyses, archives of historical literature, and other methods to resolve the origin and whereabouts of a more than 200 year old grey seal specimen held in the collections of the Natural History Museum of Denmark, and to prove that this was the lost type specimen of the species. These and similar methods may be applied to identify, describe, and study existing, lost, and novel specimens.

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