Wiley.com

Life Sciences

Press Release RSS Feed RSS

You selected: Life Sciences

February 16, 2016

Photographs and Music Lessen Patients’ Anxiety Before Surgery

A new study found that viewing photographs combined with listening to music can less patients’ anxiety before surgical operations and improve their physical and psychological well-being.

February 10, 2016

Research Findings Could Lead to New Treatments for Chronic Inflammatory Pain

New research uncovers a cascade of reactions within nerve cells that relay sensations of pain associated with inflammation. The findings, which are published in the British Journal of Pharmacology, indicate that drugs designed to curb this pathway may help relieve inflammatory pain in sufferers.

February 04, 2016

Fecal Analyses May Lead to Noninvasive Diagnostics for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

New research indicates that analyses of vapors from fecal samples can identify volatile metabolites indicative of different types of inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

January 27, 2016

American College of Prosthodontists Issues Guidelines on Maintaining Tooth-Borne and Implant-Borne Dental Restorations

Using the best level of available evidence, the American College of Prosthodontists, working with the American Dental Association, Academy of General Dentistry, and American Dental Hygienists Association, recently published the first clinical practice guidelines for patients and dental professionals as they care for tooth-borne and implant-borne restorations.

January 27, 2016

Researchers Examine the Unintentional Effects of Different Fishing Hooks and Bait on Sharks and Rays

By examining relevant studies related to fishing in the open ocean, researchers have found that while using circle instead of J-shaped hooks and fish instead of squid for bait may avoid harm to sea turtles, dolphins, certain whales, and possibly seabirds, it may increase the catch and injury of some sharks and rays.

January 19, 2016

Genetically Modified Cows May Help Combat Bovine Tuberculosis

Researchers have used a technique called transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer to generate cattle whose cells express a gene that confers resistance to the bacterium that causes bovine tuberculosis.

January 19, 2016

Global Analysis Reveals Why Many Bat Populations Are in Decline

Many of the 1,300 species of bat are considered to be threatened and declining. A new analysis reveals trends and causes of death in bats around the world, shedding new light on the possible factors underlying population declines.

January 19, 2016

Too Much Sugar During Adolescence May Alter Brain’s Reward Circuits

A new study in rats may provide significant insights into the long-term impacts of over-consumption of sugary foods during adolescence.

January 04, 2016

Virgin Births May Be Common among Snakes

A new review provides intriguing insights on parthenogenesis, or virgin birth, in snakes.

December 21, 2015

Maximizing Sea Life’s Ability to Reduce Atmospheric Carbon May Help Combat Climate Change

New research on West Antarctic seabed life reveals that the remote region of the South Orkney Islands is a carbon sink hotspot. The findings suggest that this recently designated (and world’s first) entirely high seas marine protected area may be a powerful natural ally in combating rising CO2 as sea ice melts.

December 21, 2015

Unique Breathing Cycles May Be an Important Defense for Insects

Insects exhibit breathing patterns called discontinuous gas-exchange cycles that include periods of little to no release of carbon dioxide to the environment. Researchers who studied the respiratory patterns of 15 species of ground beetles found that these cycles may minimize the risk of infestation of an insect’s tracheal system by mites and other pathogens.

December 07, 2015

Could Hippos Be Meat Eaters?

People often think hippos are herbivores with big smiling faces. Every now and then, reports of a hippo of hunting down prey, eating a carcass, or stealing prey from a crocodile are heard, but they’re typically considered 'aberrant' or 'unusual' behaviour.

December 07, 2015

Invasive Ants Threaten Native Australian Butterfly

A widespread invasive ant species is posing a significant threat to native Australian butterflies.

November 16, 2015

Flowers that Point to the Sky May Attract More Moth Pollinators

Plants that have flowers that point towards the sky may be better at attracting moth pollinators than plants that have ‘shy’ flowers that point sideways.

November 16, 2015

Fossil Discovery Shows that Three Previously Recognized Species Are In Fact Just One

On an expedition in Scotland, researchers recently discovered the fossilized remains of a mouse-sized mammal dating back around 170 million years to the Middle Jurassic. The fossil represents a lower jaw belonging to a species of 'stem therian' mammal called Palaeoxonodon that was previously known solely from isolated teeth.

November 16, 2015

How New Technologies Will Impact the Engineering of Biological Systems

A new Biotechnology and Bioengineering viewpoint article provides insights on how rapid advancements in DNA reading and writing technologies will impact how researchers go about engineering biological systems, which include processes that occur within and around cells.

November 16, 2015

Insights into the Evolution of Praying Mantis Camouflage

New research reveals that two different evolutionary shifts toward camouflage investment occurred in the charismatic horned praying mantises. The most recent shift in increased accumulation of numerous cryptic features occurred only after the re-evolution of important leg lobes that help disguise the appearance of the mantis from predators.

November 11, 2015

Bacterial Defense Systems Have Numerous Clinical and Research Applications

A new review highlights the diverse ways in which genetic-based defense systems found in bacteria can be harnessed to manipulate the microbes for various clinical and research applications. The systems, called CRISPR-Cas systems, naturally protect bacteria by recognizing and cutting genetic elements from potential invaders.

October 29, 2015

New Open Access Journal Will Advance Engineering and Opportunities in Translational Medicine

John Wiley and Sons Inc., today announced a partnership with The American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) and its Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), to launch a new quarterly, peer-reviewed, open access journal, Bioengineering & Translational Medicine. To be launched in 2016 as part of the Wiley Open Access portfolio and edited by Samir Mitragotri of the University of California, Santa Barbara, the new journal will focus on ways chemical and biological engineering are driving innovations and solutions that impact clinical practice and commercial healthcare products. The journal will also highlight scientific and technical breakthroughs currently in the process of clinical and commercial translation.

October 27, 2015

The Triological Society and Wiley launch a new open access journal

The Triological Society and John Wiley and Sons, Inc. announced today the launch of a new open access publication, Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology. Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology is a peer-reviewed open access journal focused on the rapid dissemination of the science and practice of otolaryngology head and neck surgery. The new title is a companion journal to The Laryngoscope and will publish high-quality, original research across the spectrum of basic and clinical otolaryngology.

Listings:1-2021-4041-6061-80more...