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April 10, 2015

New Clinical Platform May Accelerate Discovery of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Agents

Researchers at University of British Columbia have developed a new technology that enables rapid discovery of aptamers, one of the fastest growing classes of diagnostic and therapeutic agents. Aptamers are short sequences of genetic material that fold into precise 3-D structures that bind target molecules and inhibit their biological functions.

April 10, 2015

What Life Was Like for Newborn Giant Sea Lizards During the Age of the Dinosaur

Many scientists have studied fossils from gigantic marine lizards called mosasaurs that lived at the time of the dinosaurs and flourished in ancient seas, but little is known about aspects of their breeding and birth. Investigators have gained new insights from young mosasaur specimens collected over 100 years ago that had previously been thought to belong to ancient marine birds. Their findings are published in Palaeontology.

April 07, 2015

Newly Discovered Ancient Arthropod Lived Hundreds of Millions of Years Ago

The Burgess Shale Formation, in the Canadian Rockies of British Columbia, is one of the most famous fossil locations in the world. A recent Palaeontology study introduces a 508 million year old (middle Cambrian) arthropod—called Yawunik kootenayi—from exceptionally preserved specimens of the new Marble Canyon locality within the Burgess Shale Formation.

March 25, 2015

Wiley Launches Interdisciplinary Open Access Journal Inside the Cell

Hoboken, NJ – March 25, 2015 – John Wiley & Sons, Inc., (NYSE: JWa and JWb) — a global provider of knowledge and knowledge-enabled services—today announced the launch of Inside the Cell as part of the Wiley Open Access publishing program. Inside the Cell publishes research covering a broad range of areas within cell and molecular biology and seeks to present integrative insights of broad relevance.


March 18, 2015

Wiley Survey Offers New Insights to Aid Academic Associations

Hoboken, NEW JERSEY- March 18, 2015 — Results from a survey of researchers and research-based professionals by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.— the world’s largest society publisher with more than 900 society partnerships — reveal the most valued benefits offered to members by scholarly societies.

March 16, 2015

Can Mechanisms Used During Hibernation Help Animals Colonize New Habitats?

Heterothermy, the ability of some animals to lower their metabolism and body temperature, is traditionally seen as an effective adaptation to predictable seasonal bottlenecks of unproductive cold periods. A new review suggests that the use of heterothermy may have been used as a response to acute emergency situations in animals that colonized Madagascar.

March 16, 2015

Products that Reversibly Change Shape with Temperature May Revolutionize Medicine

New research highlights the capability of reversible shape-memory polymers to change their shape when heated to body temperature and then switch back to their original shape when cooled to room temperature.

March 02, 2015

What Makes Some Women Able to Resist or Recover Psychologically from Assault-Related Trauma?

In a study of 159 women who had been exposed to at least one assault-related potentially traumatic event, 30% developed major depressive disorder, which may be attributed to self-blame common to survivors of assault. Fewer women (21%) developed chronic posttraumatic stress disorder.

February 24, 2015

Wiley Receives Nine Prestigious PROSE Awards

Hoboken, NEW JERSEY- February 20, 2015    John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (NYSE: JWa and JWb), a global knowledge-based services provider, is honored to be the recipient of nine PROSE Awards for 2015.  The PROSE Awards recognize excellence in professional and scholarly publishing by highlighting distinguished books, journals and electronic content. 

February 04, 2015

Three Leading Wiley Journals Become Open Access

John Wiley & Sons, Inc., today announced the transition of three journals to the Wiley Open Access publishing program, bringing the total number of Wiley’s open access titles to 47.

February 02, 2015

Addressing Feral Cats' Diet May Help Protect Native Species

Because reducing the impacts of feral cats—domestic cats that have returned to the wild—is a priority for conservation efforts across the globe, a research team recently reviewed the animals’ diet across Australia and its territorial islands to help consider how they might best be managed.

February 02, 2015

Reducing Hospital Readmission Rates Will Require Community-Focused Efforts

Recent research indicates that most of the variation in hospital readmission rates in the United States is related to geography and other factors over which hospitals have little or no control. Access and quality of care outside of the hospital setting seem to be especially important.

January 20, 2015

How Social Processes Interact to Form a Professional Service Market

Using the case of the Chinese legal professions, a new article demonstrates the ambiguity and elasticity of social boundaries. The piece shows how different forms of boundary work—the social process that produces class, racial, professional and other boundaries—are simultaneously going on in the state and the system of professions, and sometimes between them, which produce the social structure of a professional service market.

January 20, 2015

Staff at Psychiatric Hospitals Often Face Threats of Physical Violence

In a survey of 348 workers at a large psychiatric hospital, 99% of the staff reported verbal conflict with patients, and 70% reported being assaulted during the previous 12 months. Verbal conflict with other staff was also high, at 92%.

December 15, 2014

Do Crows Have an Impact on the Population of their Prey?

They steal, raid nests, and keep the company of witches, but the unpopular crow may not be as big a menace as people think. A new Ibis study has found that crows—along with their avian cousins the magpie and the raven—have surprisingly little impact on the abundance of other bird species.

December 15, 2014

How Blood Parasites Colonize and Persist in Small Island Bird Populations

A new study highlights the complex factors at play for parasites that infect animal populations residing on small islands. The findings are important for understanding colonization and extinction as drivers of island biogeography.

December 15, 2014

How Trap-Flowers Attract and Deceive Pollinating Food Thieves

Researchers have discovered a new pollination system that involves food-thieving flies as pollinators. These flies feed on insect secretions, available when a spider, a praying mantis, or other predatory arthropods feed on insects. The plant mimics compounds released from freshly killed insects to deceive flies that are in search of food.

December 11, 2014

Leading Nursing Journal Publishes Protocols for Managing Obstetric Emergencies

Maternal mortality, or the death of a woman during pregnancy, at birth, or soon after birth, has been on the rise in the United States since the 1990s. Data suggest that over 50% of these deaths are preventable. One prevention strategy is the development and implementation of written protocols for obstetric emergency situations.


December 01, 2014

How Terrorist Attack Survivors View their Interactions with the Media

Among survivors of the 2011 Utøya Island terrorist attack in Norway, most perceived contact with media as a positive experience. Among those who allowed themselves to be interviewed by the media, 13% found the experience distressing and 11% regretted participating.

November 13, 2014

New Findings Could Help Keep Satellites and Space Debris from Colliding

Half a million objects, including debris, satellites, and the International Space Station, orbit the planet in the thermosphere, the largest layer of Earth’s atmosphere. To predict the orbits—and potential collisions—of all this stuff, scientists must forecast the weather in the thermosphere.