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January 04, 2016

Virgin Births May Be Common among Snakes

A new review provides intriguing insights on parthenogenesis, or virgin birth, in snakes.

December 21, 2015

Maximizing Sea Life’s Ability to Reduce Atmospheric Carbon May Help Combat Climate Change

New research on West Antarctic seabed life reveals that the remote region of the South Orkney Islands is a carbon sink hotspot. The findings suggest that this recently designated (and world’s first) entirely high seas marine protected area may be a powerful natural ally in combating rising CO2 as sea ice melts.

December 21, 2015

Unique Breathing Cycles May Be an Important Defense for Insects

Insects exhibit breathing patterns called discontinuous gas-exchange cycles that include periods of little to no release of carbon dioxide to the environment. Researchers who studied the respiratory patterns of 15 species of ground beetles found that these cycles may minimize the risk of infestation of an insect’s tracheal system by mites and other pathogens.

December 07, 2015

Could Hippos Be Meat Eaters?

People often think hippos are herbivores with big smiling faces. Every now and then, reports of a hippo of hunting down prey, eating a carcass, or stealing prey from a crocodile are heard, but they’re typically considered 'aberrant' or 'unusual' behaviour.

December 07, 2015

Invasive Ants Threaten Native Australian Butterfly

A widespread invasive ant species is posing a significant threat to native Australian butterflies.

November 16, 2015

Flowers that Point to the Sky May Attract More Moth Pollinators

Plants that have flowers that point towards the sky may be better at attracting moth pollinators than plants that have ‘shy’ flowers that point sideways.

November 16, 2015

Fossil Discovery Shows that Three Previously Recognized Species Are In Fact Just One

On an expedition in Scotland, researchers recently discovered the fossilized remains of a mouse-sized mammal dating back around 170 million years to the Middle Jurassic. The fossil represents a lower jaw belonging to a species of 'stem therian' mammal called Palaeoxonodon that was previously known solely from isolated teeth.

November 16, 2015

How New Technologies Will Impact the Engineering of Biological Systems

A new Biotechnology and Bioengineering viewpoint article provides insights on how rapid advancements in DNA reading and writing technologies will impact how researchers go about engineering biological systems, which include processes that occur within and around cells.

November 16, 2015

Insights into the Evolution of Praying Mantis Camouflage

New research reveals that two different evolutionary shifts toward camouflage investment occurred in the charismatic horned praying mantises. The most recent shift in increased accumulation of numerous cryptic features occurred only after the re-evolution of important leg lobes that help disguise the appearance of the mantis from predators.

November 11, 2015

Bacterial Defense Systems Have Numerous Clinical and Research Applications

A new review highlights the diverse ways in which genetic-based defense systems found in bacteria can be harnessed to manipulate the microbes for various clinical and research applications. The systems, called CRISPR-Cas systems, naturally protect bacteria by recognizing and cutting genetic elements from potential invaders.

October 29, 2015

New Open Access Journal Will Advance Engineering and Opportunities in Translational Medicine

John Wiley and Sons Inc., today announced a partnership with The American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) and its Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), to launch a new quarterly, peer-reviewed, open access journal, Bioengineering & Translational Medicine. To be launched in 2016 as part of the Wiley Open Access portfolio and edited by Samir Mitragotri of the University of California, Santa Barbara, the new journal will focus on ways chemical and biological engineering are driving innovations and solutions that impact clinical practice and commercial healthcare products. The journal will also highlight scientific and technical breakthroughs currently in the process of clinical and commercial translation.

October 27, 2015

The Triological Society and Wiley launch a new open access journal

The Triological Society and John Wiley and Sons, Inc. announced today the launch of a new open access publication, Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology. Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology is a peer-reviewed open access journal focused on the rapid dissemination of the science and practice of otolaryngology head and neck surgery. The new title is a companion journal to The Laryngoscope and will publish high-quality, original research across the spectrum of basic and clinical otolaryngology.

October 19, 2015

How Wind Might Impact Birds’ Migration Routes

For centuries, scientists have been working to unravel the many mysteries of bird migration, studying where birds go, how they find their way, and how much of the information they need is inherited and how much is learned.

October 05, 2015

Cryptic Invasions by Ecological Engineers Conceal Profound Changes in Nature

A new study reveals that the salt marsh plant Spartina alterniflora, which grows on more than 9,000 km of the Atlantic coastline of South America, is not native to the area and was in fact introduced 200 years ago.

September 24, 2015

Wiley Launches Journal to Help Solve World Challenges

John Wiley and Sons, Inc., today announced the launch of Global Challenges, a new open access journal devoted to creating a global community to address major challenges the world faces. Global challenges such as climate change, energy scarcity, health and nutrition security, pandemic disease, and access to sufficient water resources are a priority for every government and critical for their citizens. Addressing such challenges in a sustainable manner requires strategic research investments, international collaboration, collective resources and knowledge exchange between diverse communities.

September 24, 2015

Expanded Education for Women in Malawi Does Not Lead to Later Childbearing

The age at first birth in Malawi has remained constant from 1992 to 2010, despite expanded access to education for girls. Social demographer Monica Grant explores this finding in a new Population and Development Review paper, noting that it does not imply that women would have been better off in the absence of recent education policies.

12:00 AM EDT September 24, 2015

Researchers Find Ticks Linked with Lyme Disease in South London Parks

Visitors to 2 popular parks in South London are at risk of coming into contact with ticks that can transmit Lyme disease to humans, according to a new study in Medical and Veterinary Entomology.

September 21, 2015

Experts Offer Perspectives on Cheating in Mutually Beneficial Relationships

Mutualism, when two species both benefit from their relationship with each other, is important for the survival of many organisms. There is ongoing debate regarding the importance of cheating in such relationships, with many believing that cheating is both widespread and highly threatening to the evolutionary persistence of mutualism.

September 21, 2015

How Mercury Contamination Affects Reptiles in the Amazon Basin

Mercury contamination in water and on land is of worldwide concern due to its toxic effects on ecosystems and human health. Mercury toxicity is of particular concern to reptiles because they are currently experiencing population declines. Also, reptiles are ideal indicators of mercury contamination in aquatic environments because they are long lived and occupy diverse habitats.


September 08, 2015

Ozone Can Reduce a Flower’s Scent that’s Critical for Attracting Pollinators

New research shows that high levels of ozone, which are predicted to increase in the atmosphere in the future, can dampen the scents of flowers that attract bees and other pollinators.