Wiley
Wiley.com

Medicine & Healthcare

Press Release RSS Feed RSS

You selected: Medicine & Healthcare

January 27, 2015

Low Sodium Levels Increases Liver Transplant Survival Benefit in the Sickest Patients

Researchers report that low levels of sodium in the blood, known as hyponatremia, increase the risk of dying for patients on the liver transplant waiting list. The study published in Liver Transplantation, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society, showed an increase in survival benefit for patients with hyponatremia and a Model for End Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score of 12 or more.

12:00 AM EST January 26, 2015

Many Women with Breast Cancer Have Poor Knowledge about their Condition

A new analysis has found that many women with breast cancer lack knowledge about their illness, with minority patients less likely than white patients to know and report accurate information about their tumors’ characteristics.

12:00 AM EST January 23, 2015

New Review Looks at the Effect of Thyroid Disorders on Reproductive Health

Thyroid disease can have significant effects on a woman’s reproductive health and screening for women presenting with fertility problems and recurrent early pregnancy loss should be considered, suggests a new review published today (23 January) in The Obstetrician & Gynaecologist (TOG).

12:00 AM EST January 22, 2015

Long-term Use of Hormonal Contraceptives Is Associated with an Increased Risk of Brain Tumours

Taking a hormonal contraceptive for at least five years is associated with a possible increase in a young woman’s risk of developing a rare tumour, glioma of the brain. This project focussed on women aged 15 –49 years and the findings are published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

12:00 AM EST January 21, 2015

Link Found between Pain during or after Sexual Intercourse and Mode of Delivery

Operative birth is associated with persisting pain during or after sexual intercourse, known as dyspareunia, suggests a new study published today (21 January) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG).

January 20, 2015

High-Dose Statin May Protect Heart Surgery Patients’ Kidney Health

Acute kidney injury often arises after major surgery because the kidneys can be deprived of normal blood flow during the procedure. The use of contrast media, or dyes, can contribute to this problem. In patients undergoing coronary angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention, which are heart procedures that use dyes to help surgeons visualize the arteries, a high dose of the statin atorvastatin was linked with a reduction in blood levels of creatinine, a marker of kidney injury, as well as a lower incidence of acute kidney injury compared with a low dose of the statin.

January 20, 2015

Mortality-To-Incidence Equation Helps Identify Global Disparities in Cancer Screening and Treatment

Disparities in cancer screening, incidence, treatment, and survival are worsening globally. In a new study on colorectal cancer, researchers found that the mortality-to-incidence ratio (MIR) can help identify whether a country has a higher mortality than might be expected based on cancer incidence. Countries with lower-than-expected MIRs have strong national health systems characterized by formal colorectal cancer screening programs. Conversely, countries with higher-than-expected MIRs are more likely to lack such screening programs.

January 20, 2015

Regular Exercise May Boost Brain Health in Adults

In the brain, blood flow and cognitive function peak during young adulthood, but a new study of 52 young women found that oxygen availability, which is known to positively relate to brain health and function, is higher in adults who exercise regularly. Women who exercised on a regular basis had higher oxygen availability in the anterior frontal region of the brain and performed best on difficult cognitive tasks.

January 20, 2015

Staff at Psychiatric Hospitals Often Face Threats of Physical Violence

In a survey of 348 workers at a large psychiatric hospital, 99% of the staff reported verbal conflict with patients, and 70% reported being assaulted during the previous 12 months. Verbal conflict with other staff was also high, at 92%.

12:00 AM EST January 15, 2015

Lower Mortality Rates Among Asian and Hispanic Lupus Patients

A new study by researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts reveals that Asian and Hispanic patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have lower mortality rates compared to Black, White, or Native Americans with the disease. Findings published in Arthritis & Rheumatology,a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), indicate that the risk for death among White patients is much lower than in Black and Native American SLE patients.

7:00 PM EST January 13, 2015

The Challenges of Providing Obstetric Care during an Ebola Epidemic

Obstetric interventions during an Ebola epidemic are deeply challenging say two new commentaries published today (14 January) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG).

12:00 AM EST January 12, 2015

Many Cancer Survivors Have Unmet Physical and Mental Needs Related to their Disease and its Treatment

Even decades after being cured, many cancer survivors face physical and mental challenges resulting from their disease and its treatment. That’s the conclusion of a new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The findings could help clinicians and other experts develop interventions that are tailored to the specific types of problems and concerns that cancer survivors may experience.

January 09, 2015

New Analysis Looks at Risk Factors for Direct Maternal Deaths in the UK

Medical co-morbidities, when women have one or more medical conditions, are found to be an important factor associated with direct maternal deaths, suggests a new study published today (9 January) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG).

12:00 AM EST December 22, 2014

Bone Loss Drugs May Help Prevent Endometrial Cancer

A new analysis suggests that women who use bisphosphonates—medications commonly used to treat osteoporosis and other bone conditions—have about half the risk of developing endometrial cancer as women who do not use the drugs.

7:00 PM EST December 18, 2014

New review examines latest evidence on using hormone replacement therapy for treating menopausal symptoms

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is the most effective treatment for menopausal symptoms, in particular for younger women at the onset of the menopause, suggests a new review published today (19 December) in The Obstetrician & Gynaecologist (TOG).

12:00 AM EST December 18, 2014

Laparoscopic Surgery for Bladder Cancer Leads to Good Long-Term Cancer Control

Long-term survival rates following laparoscopic surgery for bladder cancer are comparable to those of open surgery, according to a study published in BJU International.

December 18, 2014

What Can Be Done to Prevent Hepatitis C Patients from Being Lost in the Healthcare System?

A new study shows that many patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are lost during different stages of health care to manage the disease. This real-life’ view of the HCV patient care continuum in a major U.S. urban area is published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, and highlights the importance of generating awareness among clinicians and at-risk groups about appropriate HCV testing, referral, support and care.

12:00 AM EST December 17, 2014

NEW evidence shows Electronic Cigarettes facilitate smoking cessation

Do electronic cigarettes help smokers to quit? Yes, but….

New Cochrane review finds emerging evidence that smokers who use electronic cigarettes can stop or reduce their smoking.

7:00 PM EST December 16, 2014

BJOG release: New study outlines research priorities to improve the care of women with FGM

Further evidence on how to improve the care of women living with Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is urgently needed, suggests a new study, published today (17December) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG).

December 15, 2014

Even Expectant Dads Experience Prenatal Hormone Changes

Researchers recently completed one of the most extensive investigations to date of prenatal hormones in first-time expectant couples. Women showed large prenatal increases in salivary testosterone, cortisol, estradiol, and progesterone, while men showed significant prenatal declines in testosterone and estradiol, but no detectable changes in cortisol or progesterone.

Listings:1-2021-4041-6061-80more...