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August 16, 2013

Bypassing Immune Rejection in Stem-Cell-Based Therapies

STEM CELLS describes a new regimen for quashing the immunologic barrier, a short-course treatment with two costimlation-adhesion blockade agents, allowing engraftment of transplanted differentiated stem cells and their prolonged survival in tissue.

12:00 AM EDT August 15, 2013

In Nonsmoking Women, Breastfeeding for More Than Six Months May Protect Against Breast Cancer

A new analysis has found that breastfeeding for more than six months may safeguard nonsmoking mothers against breast cancer. The same does not seem to hold true for smoking mothers, though. Published early online in the Journal of Clinical Nursing, the findings add to the list of benefits of breastfeeding for women and their babies.

12:00 AM EDT August 13, 2013

Stroke declines dramatically, still higher in Mexican Americans

A new study reports that the incidence of ischemic stroke—the most common type of stroke, caused by a clot in the blood vessels of the brain—among non-Hispanic Whites and Mexican Americans over age 60 has declined over the past decade. Most concerning, however, is that the increased relative burden of stroke comparing Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic Whites has not changed at all in the last decade. Overall, Mexican Americans suffer much more, 34%, from this disease than non-Hispanic Whites. Findings are published in Annals of Neurology, a journal of the American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society.

12:00 AM EDT August 12, 2013

Carbon Ion Radiotherapy Safe and Effective for Treating Inoperable Spinal Tumors

A new analysis has found that a type of radiation therapy called carbon ion radiotherapy can control cancer growth and prolong survival in patients with spinal tumors. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates that the treatment is a promising alternative for patients whose spinal tumors cannot be surgically removed.

August 06, 2013

Exercise May Reduce Heart Disease Risk in Liver Transplant Recipients

New research reveals that metabolic syndrome—risk factors that can lead to heart disease and/or stroke—is common in liver transplant recipients, with rates highest at one year following the procedure. Findings published in Liver Transplantation, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society, indicate that exercise could reduce complications from metabolic disease in patients post-transplantation.

12:00 AM EDT August 06, 2013

Personality May Affect a New Mother’s Decision to Breastfeed

A new analysis has found that mothers who are more extroverted and less anxious are more likely to breastfeed and to continue to breastfeed than mothers who are introverted or anxious. Published early online in the Journal of Advanced Nursing, the study indicates that new mothers with certain personalities may need additional support and education to help them feel confident, self assured, and knowledgeable about breastfeeding.

7:00 PM EDT August 04, 2013

Do Antioxidants Improve a Woman’s Chances of Conceiving?

There is no high quality evidence that antioxidant supplements help to increase a woman’s chances of having a baby, according to the results of a new systematic review. The review, published in The Cochrane Library, found women were no more likely to conceive when taking oral antioxidants and that there was limited information about potential harms.

12:00 AM EDT August 01, 2013

Both Parents Experience Highs and Lows in Sexuality After Childbirth

Partners of new mothers often experience shifts in sexuality, and these shifts are often unrelated to biological or medical factors pertaining to childbirth. The findings, which are published in a recent issue of The Journal of Sexual Medicine, expand current understanding of postpartum sexuality, and may help health professionals as they counsel new parents.

August 01, 2013

Clean water and soap may help improve growth in young children

Improving water quality and hygiene practices may improve the growth of children, according to a new report. The Cochrane review – authored by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and WaterAid – found evidence of small but significant improvements in growth of children under the age of five who have access to clean water and soap.

July 31, 2013

American Neurological Association and Wiley launch New Open Access Journal

John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and the American Neurological Association (ANA) announced today a partnership to launch Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, a new online-only, open access journal.

July 30, 2013

Cigarettes cheaper in lower income areas

Cigarettes are more widely available and cheaper in the most disadvantaged suburbs. Relatively little attention has been paid to the potential impact that tobacco retailing regulation could have on smoking prevalence in Australia, particularly in areas of socioeconomic disadvantage.

July 30, 2013

Refugees feel stress being separated from family

Refugees cite separation from family as an important source of stress and sadness in their lives.

12:00 AM EDT July 29, 2013

Higher Cancer Incidences Found in Regions Near Refineries and Plants that Release Benzene

The incidence of a particular type of blood cancer is significantly higher in regions near facilities that release the chemical benzene into the environment. That is the conclusion of a new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. This and other studies like it will be critical to identifying and enacting public health policies to decrease or prevent cancer.

12:00 AM EDT July 25, 2013

Obese Kidney Failure Patients Receive Survival Benefit from Transplantation

Most obese individuals with kidney failure can prolong their lives by receiving a kidney transplant, although this survival benefit is lower in severely obese individuals. That’s the conclusion of a new study published in the American Journal of Transplantation. The findings will hopefully decrease differences in access to transplantation for obese patients.

July 22, 2013

Large tick bite study finds 6% life-threatening reaction

A study of over 500 cases of tick bites presenting to a single New South Wales hospital over a two-year period, the largest recorded study of its type, has found 6% (34) of the bites resulted in anaphylaxis – an acute life-threatening hypersensitivity reaction.

12:00 AM EDT July 22, 2013

Program May Hold Promise for Reducing Avoidable Hospital Readmissions

Recent federal legislation imposes financial penalties on hospitals that experience excessive patient readmissions within 30 days. A new study published today in the Journal of Hospital Medicine looks at the potential of a program designed to improve the discharge process and prevent avoidable rehospitalizations.

12:00 AM EDT July 18, 2013

Antiepileptic Drug Use While Pregnant Impacts Early Child Development

Children whose mothers took antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) while pregnant are at increased risk of early development issues, according to a new study published in Epilepsia, a journal published by Wiley on behalf of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). Results of the study suggest that children exposed to AEDs in the womb were at risk for difficulties with motor development, language skills, social skills, and autistic traits compared to children whose mothers did not take anti-seizure medications.

7:00 PM EDT July 17, 2013

Mortality Rates for Emergency Surgical Admissions Vary Widely Among Hospitals in England

A new study reveals significant hospital-to-hospital variability in patient death rates following emergency surgical admissions in England. Published early online in the BJS (British Journal of Surgery), the study also found that survival rates were higher in hospitals with better resources.

July 17, 2013

Sugar Coating Reveals Black Death: Plague detection through anti-carbohydrate antibodies

Even today, the lives of humans and animals are claimed by plague. A new antibody-based detection method can be used to reliably and sensitively identify plague in patient serum and other biological samples. The antibody specifically recognizes a particular carbohydrate structure found on the cell surfaces of the bacterium that causes plague, as reported by German researchers in the journal Angewandte Chemie.

July 15, 2013

Heightening Taste Without Using Salt: Heston Turns to Umami

From: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture