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October 06, 2014

Most Liver Cancer Patients Do Not Receive Proper Care

Many US patients with liver cancer—even those with early stage disease that can often be cured—do not receive treatment for their disease, according to an analysis of studies published between 1989 and 2013.

October 06, 2014

Oxycodone May Be More Dangerous than Other Addictive Pain Medication

While all prescription opioids can be abused, oxycodone may be more potent in its ability to promote changes in the brain relevant to addiction.

October 06, 2014

Stigma Can Hinder Access to Health Care for the Poor

In a study of 574 low-income adults, many felt stigmatized when receiving medical care. This stigma was most often the result of interactions with clinicians that felt demeaning, rather than an internalized sense of shame related to receiving public insurance or charity care.

October 06, 2014

There's No Such Thing as a Vaginal Orgasm

G-spot, vaginal, or clitoral orgasms are all incorrect terms, experts say. In a recent Clinical Anatomy review, they argue that like ‘male orgasm’, ‘female orgasm’ is the correct term.

12:00 AM EDT October 01, 2014

Is Australia prepared for Ebola?

Australia needs to be proactive about potential disease outbreaks like Ebola and establish a national centre for disease control.

In an Editorial in the October issue of Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, Allen Cheng from Monash University and Heath Kelly from the Australian National University question Australia’s preparation for public health crises.

12:00 AM EDT September 22, 2014

E-Cigarettes Unhelpful in Smoking Cessation among Cancer Patients

In a new study of cancer patients who smoke, those using e-cigarettes (in addition to traditional cigarettes) were more nicotine dependent and equally or less likely to have quit smoking traditional cigarettes than non-users.

September 17, 2014

Silvercloud Health and Wiley Announce Partnership to Provide Online Therapeutic Solutions

SilverCloud Health and Wiley announced a strategic partnership to see the creation of a comprehensive range of therapeutic programs across behavioral health and long-term chronic disease management to be delivered via SilverCloud Health’s award-winning cloud-based technology platform.

September 15, 2014

A Thin Line Lies Between Fantasy and Reality in People with Psychopathic Traits

New research indicates that people with psychopathic traits have a preference for nonromantic sexual fantasies with anonymous and uncommitted partners. The study’s investigators noted that psychopathic sexual behavior is likely due to a preference for sexual activity outside a loving, committed relationship rather than only an inability to form such relationships.

September 15, 2014

Cellular Protein May Be Key to Longevity

Researchers have found that levels of a regulatory protein called ATF4, and the corresponding levels of the molecules whose expression it controls, are elevated in the livers of mice exposed to multiple interventions known increase longevity.

September 15, 2014

Genes May Help Explain Why Some People Are Naturally More Interested in Music than Others

Research suggests that genes that affect hearing and cognitive function may play roles in one’s musical aptitude, or the ability to understand and perceive rhythm, pitch, timbre, tone durations, and formal structure in music.

12:00 AM EDT September 15, 2014

Hypersensitivity to Non-Painful Events May Be Part of Pathology in Fibromyalgia

New research shows that patients with fibromyalgia have hypersensitivity to non-painful events based on images of the patients’ brains, which show reduced activation in primary sensory regions and increased activation in sensory integration areas. Findings published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), suggest that brain abnormalities in response to non-painful sensory stimulation may cause the increased unpleasantness that patients experience in response to daily visual, auditory and tactile stimulation.

September 15, 2014

Largest ever study of awareness during general anaesthesia identifies risk factors and consequences for patients, including long-term psychological harm

Accidental awareness is one of the most feared complications of general anaesthesia for both patients and anaesthetists. Patients report this failure of general anaesthesia in approximately 1 in every 19,000 cases, according to a report published in Anaesthesia. Known as accidental awareness during general anaesthesia (AAGA), it occurs when general anaesthesia is intended but the patient remains conscious.  This incidence of patient reports of awareness is much lower than previous estimates of awareness, which were as high as 1 in 600.

September 15, 2014

Poor Diet May Increase Risk of Parkinson's Disease

Obesity caused by a high-fat diet may increase the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, new research in mice suggests. Upon aging, a high-fat diet significantly accelerated the onset of neurological symptoms in mice that were genetically predisposed to develop Parkinson’s disease.

September 15, 2014

Working Long Hours May Increase Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

Working more than a 40-hour week has been linked to stress, dissatisfaction, and compromised health, and now new research on 8,350 Korean adults finds that it may also increase one’s risk of developing coronary heart disease, or narrowing of the blood vessels that supply blood and oxygen to the heart.

7:00 PM EDT September 14, 2014

Cheaper alternative to licensed drug for treating eye disease has similar side-effects says new Cochrane Review

Health policies which favour using ranibizumab for treating eye disease in older people over safety concerns for a cheaper alternative should take account of a new Cochrane Review published today.

September 10, 2014

Living Liver Donors Ambivalent with Donation

Living donors are important to increasing the number of viable grafts for liver transplantation. A new study published in Liver Transplantation, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society, found that ambivalence is common among donor candidates. However, providing social support may help minimize the donors’ concerns regarding donation.

12:00 AM EDT September 08, 2014

Many Patients in Cancer Centers May Not Experience a Dignified Death

A new study that surveyed physicians and nurses in hospitals within cancer centers in Germany suggests that many patients there do not experience a dignified death. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates the need for cancer centers to invest more in palliative care services, adequate rooms for dying patients, staff training in end-of-life care, and advance-care-planning standards.

12:01 AM EDT September 03, 2014

Unplanned Births Out-of-Hospital Increases Risk of Infant Mortality

New research reveals that unplanned births out-of-hospital in Norway are associated with higher infant mortality. The findings published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, indicate that young women who have given birth at least once before (multiparous) and those living in remote areas are more likely to have unplanned deliveries, which may increase the risk of death in newborns.

September 03, 2014

Liver Injury Caused by Herbals, Dietary Supplements Rises in Study Population

New research shows that liver injury caused by herbals and dietary supplements increased from 7% to 20% in a U.S. study group over a ten-year period. According to the study published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, liver injury caused by non-bodybuilding supplements is most severe, occurring more often in middle-aged women and more frequently resulting in death or the need for transplantation than liver injury from bodybuilding supplements or conventional medications.

 

September 02, 2014

A Handsome Face Could Mean Lower Semen Quality

Contrary to what one might expect, facial masculinity was negatively associated with semen quality in a recent Journal of Evolutionary Biology study. As increased levels of testosterone have been demonstrated to impair sperm production, this finding may indicate a trade-off between investments in secondary sexual signaling (i.e. facial masculinity) and fertility.

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