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September 09, 2016

How Long Should Children Play Video Games?

A new study indicates that playing video games for a limited amount of time each week may provide benefits to children, but too much can be detrimental. The findings are published in the Annals of Neurology.

September 09, 2016

Study Examines Cancer Rates among World Trade Center–Exposed Firefighters

Researchers found no overall increase in cancer risk among World Trade Center (WTC)–exposed firefighters following the 9/11 attacks compared with other firefighters from several US cities. They noted a nearly 4-fold increase in the rate in thyroid cancer, but this increased risk was not significant after controlling for possible biases related to cancer screening. (WTC-exposed firefighters have access to health care and routine health monitoring exams even after retirement.) 

September 06, 2016

Adverse drug reactions may be under-reported in young children

A new study reveals that adverse drug reactions in newborns and infants may be under-reported.


September 06, 2016

Brain peptide research may lead to promising new treatments for mental illnesses

Recent research points to the importance of a molecule called relaxin-3 in the brain, with effects on various processes and behaviors such as mood, stress, and cognition. Because these are often aberrant in mental illnesses, investigators are studying the potential of relaxin-3-based interventions to treat depression, anxiety, and other conditions.

September 06, 2016

Cardioprotective Drug Can Help Prevent Long-Term Heart Damage in Children who Receive Chemotherapy

A potent chemotherapy drug can be life saving for children with cancer, but a new review highlights how it can have long-lasting negative effects on the heart. The review, which is published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, also indicates that this chemotherapy-related heart damage may be prevented by a cardioprotective drug.

September 06, 2016

Communication and coordination of care are important for ensuring lupus patients’ health

Results from a recent study suggest that improved communication and coordination of care between patients, physicians, and health insurers can provide important health benefits for patients with lupus. 

September 06, 2016

Epilepsy surgery found safe and cost-effective

Research has shown that surgery can provide important benefits for patients with epilepsy. Now a new study finds that it is also cost-effective.

September 06, 2016

Greater efforts are needed to eliminate female genital mutilation

The World Health Organization reports that more than 200 million girls and women currently have been subjected to female genital mutilation/cutting worldwide, and three million girls continue to be at risk each year. A new review details how the practice affects individuals physically and psychologically, noting that such traditions that dehumanize and injure are human rights violations. 

September 06, 2016

Infant circumcision can be safely performed in rural Africa

A new study indicates that early infant circumcision, which helps to prevent HIV transmission later in life, can be safely performed in rural Uganda.


September 06, 2016

Over-the-counter head lice treatments are likely to fail

A recent review on head lice treatments available in the United States described a marked decline in the effectiveness of permethrin/synergized pyrethrins (collectively pyrethroids), likely due to resistance arising from widespread and indiscriminate use over 30 years.

September 06, 2016

Research points to new treatment strategy against alzheimer’s disease

New research suggests that Alzheimer’s disease may trigger increased expression of an enzyme called lysozyme, which attempts to counteract amyloid build-up in the brain.


September 06, 2016

Review highlights the range of negative health effects linked with red meat consumption

A new review provides a comprehensive summary of the potential negative health effects of eating red meat. Results from published studies and analyses indicate significant, although weak to moderate, increased risks for diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and cancer with the consumption of red meat, especially processed meat.

5:00 PM EDT September 05, 2016

High quality evidence suggests Vitamin D can reduce asthma attacks

A new Cochrane Review, published in the Cochrane Library today, has found evidence from randomised trials, that taking an oral vitamin D supplement in addition to standard asthma medication is likely to reduce severe asthma attacks.

September 02, 2016

Walking a Tightrope: Regulators Balancing Need for Safety & Flexibility in Approvals for New Medicines

It can be challenging for regulators to keep up with advances related to medical drugs and devices. A new analysis and editorial published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology provide insights on how officials are working to support accelerated access to new therapies while also ensuring their safety.    

August 22, 2016

Many Stroke Patients Experience Delays in Seeking and Receiving Care

A new study reveals that many patients are not aware that they are having a stroke when they are experiencing symptoms. 

12:00 AM EDT August 22, 2016

Socioeconomic Factors—Not Race or Ethnicity—Influence Survival of Younger Patients with Multiple Myeloma

Advances in the treatment of multiple myeloma, a cancer that forms in a type of white blood cell, have led to improved survival predominantly among young and white patients, with less of an increase in survival observed in patients of other ethnicities. A new study indicates that this gap is mostly due to socioeconomic differences between whites and ethnic minorities, not race itself. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.

7:00 PM EDT August 21, 2016

Color-Graded Pictogram Label to Reduce Medicine-Related Traffic Crashes Found Ineffective

A new study questions the effectiveness of using pictogram message on the labels of anxiety and sleep medications that interfere with driving – an approach this is currently implemented across France. The British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study found that the risk of being responsible for a crash associated with these medicines did not decrease long-term after the pictogram was introduced.

August 15, 2016

DASH Diet May Help Prevent Gout Flares

New research indicates that a healthy diet can effectively lower blood levels of uric acid, a known trigger of gout. The findings are published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR).

August 15, 2016

Study Examines ‘Weekend Effect’ in Emergency Surgery Patients

Research has pointed to a ‘weekend effect’ in which patients admitted to the hospital on Saturdays or Sundays are more likely to die than those admitted on week days. A new study has now assessed whether a weekend effect exists in a specified population: patients admitted for emergency general surgery.


12:00 AM EDT August 08, 2016

Large Population-Based Studies Bolster Evidence that Insurance Status Affects Cancer Patients’ Health and Survival

Two new studies indicate that health insurance status may impact patients’ health outcomes following a diagnosis of cancer. Cancer patients who were uninsured or had Medicaid coverage experienced a variety of disparities—including being diagnosed at a later stage, receiving less than optimal treatment, and having shorter survival times—when compared with patients with other forms of insurance. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.