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12:00 AM EDT August 11, 2014

One in Six Lupus Patients Readmitted to Hospital within 30 days of Discharge

A new study reveals that one in six patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of being discharged. Results published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), show that black and Hispanic SLE patients were more likely to be readmitted than white patients. Readmissions among patients insured by Medicare or Medicaid were also more likely compared to patients covered by private insurance.

12:00 AM EDT August 11, 2014

U.S. Lung Cancer Rates Vary by Subtype, Sex, Race/Ethnicity, and Age

A new analysis confirms that US lung cancer rates are declining overall, but it also uncovers previously unrecognized trends related to cancer subtype, sex, race/ethnicity, and age.

12:00 AM EDT August 06, 2014

Healthy diet set early in life

Promoting a healthy diet from infancy is important to prevent childhood obesity and the onset of chronic disease.
This is the finding from a study published in the latest issue of Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health.

12:00 AM EDT August 06, 2014

Nutrition an issue for Indigenous Australians

Nutrition has not been given enough priority in national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policy in recent years.
This is the finding from a study published in the latest issue of Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health.

August 04, 2014

Inadequately Managed Allergies Cause Significant Economic Burden in Europe

New research indicates that avoidable indirect costs per patient insufficiently treated for allergy equal 2,405.00 Euros per year due to absence from work and reduced working capacity. On the other hand, appropriate therapy is available at an average cost of 125 Euros per patient annually, which represents only 5% of the cost of untreated disease.

August 04, 2014

Maternal Singing During Skin-to-Skin Contact Benefits Both Preterm Infants and Their Mothers

A mother who sings to her preterm infant while providing ‘kangaroo care,’ or holding with direct skin-to-skin contact, may see improvements in both her child’s and her own health. The finding comes from an Acta Paediatrica study of 86 mother-infant pairs in a neonatal intensive care unit in Meir Hospital in Israel.

August 04, 2014

Most Gay and Bisexual Men in the United States Have Used Lubricants During Sexual Activity

More than 90% of gay and bisexual men in the United States have used lubricants to enhance a wide range of sexual activities, including but not limited to anal intercourse, researchers report in a Journal of Sexual Medicine study.

August 04, 2014

Patients with Hypoventilation May Need Supplemental Oxygen On-Board Flights

Severely overweight people who suffer from hypoventilation can have abnormally low levels of oxygen (hypoxaemia) in their blood during air travel as a result of reduced atmospheric pressure in the cabin of aircrafts.

August 04, 2014

Very Early Treatment May Be Key to Combatting Inherited Metabolic Disorder

A European Journal of Neuroscience study suggests that it is critical to treat lysosomal storage disorders early, before symptoms arise. These genetic disorders, which are caused by the malfunction of enzymes that normally degrade various substances within cells, lead to numerous ailments including neurological problems.

12:00 AM EDT July 28, 2014

Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 is Most Prevalent Worldwide

In one of the largest prevalence studies to date, researchers from the U.K. provide national, regional, and global genotype prevalence estimates for the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Findings published in Hepatology,a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, indicate that genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide, with over 83 million patients infected of which one-third reside in East Asia. Genotype 3, at just over 54 million cases, is the next most prevalent, followed by genotypes 2, 4, 6, and 5.

12:00 AM EDT July 28, 2014

Lifestyle Choices May Affect the Long-Term Heart Health of Childhood Cancer Survivors

A new study has found that following a healthy lifestyle may lower childhood cancer survivors’ risk of developing the metabolic syndrome.

July 21, 2014

Global Studies in Asians May Be Applicable to a Wide Array of Asian Populations

A new Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study shows how guidelines on the use of clinical data have resulted in more reliable data worldwide, allowing drugs to reach Asian populations sooner than in the past.

July 21, 2014

Many Individuals May Be Predisposed to Empathy

A new study in Brain and Behavior provides physical evidence that highly sensitive individuals respond especially strongly to social situations that trigger emotions.

July 21, 2014

Mental Health Issues Uncovered in Children with Relatives Who Participated in Manhunt after Boston Marathon Attack

Children with relatives who were called upon to participate in the interagency manhunt following the Boston Marathon attack carried a particularly heavy mental health burden, according to a Depression and Anxiety study that included surveys of Boston-area parents and other caretakers.

July 21, 2014

New Joint Education Standards Help GI & Hepatology Training Programs Meet Accreditation Requirements

A team of representatives from five gastroenterology and hepatology societies have created a toolbox designed to help gastroenterology training directors meet the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Internal Medicine Subspecialty Reporting Milestones requirements while training fellows to independently care for patients.

12:00 AM EDT July 17, 2014

Best Anticoagulants After Orthopedic Procedures Depends on Type of Surgery

Current guidelines do not distinguish between aspirin and more potent blood thinners for protecting against blood clots in patients who undergo major orthopedic operations, leaving the decision up to individual clinicians.

7:00 PM EDT July 16, 2014

Asthma drugs suppress growth

Corticosteroid drugs that are given by inhalers to children with asthma may suppress their growth, evidence suggests. Two new systematic reviews published in The Cochrane Library focus on the effects of inhaled corticosteroid drugs (ICS) on growth rates. The authors found children’s growth slowed in the first year of treatment, although the effects were minimised by using lower doses.

12:00 AM EDT July 16, 2014

Donating a Kidney May Make it Difficult to Change or Initiate Life and Health Insurance

People who selflessly step up and donate a kidney can face insurance challenges afterwards, despite the lack of evidence that they have increased health risks. The finding, which comes from a new study published in the American Journal of Transplantation, suggests that actions by insurers may create unnecessary burden and stress for those choosing to donate and could negatively impact the likelihood of live kidney donation.

July 15, 2014

To Accept or Not Accept…Patients Want a Say in Liver Transplant Decisions

A novel study reveals that more than half of liver transplant patients want to be informed of donor risk at the time a liver is offered for transplantation. Nearly 80% of those patients want to be involved in the decision of whether or not to accept the organ according to findings published in Liver Transplantation, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society.

12:00 AM EDT July 14, 2014

Testicular Cancer Rates Are on the Rise in Young Hispanic Americans

A new analysis has found that rates of testicular cancer have been rising dramatically in recent years among young Hispanic American men, but not among their non-Hispanic counterparts.

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