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November 02, 2015

Sexual Dysfunction Is Prevalent Among Recently Deployed Veterans

In a recent study of 247 US veterans returning from conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, almost 18% screened positive for sexual functioning difficulties. Self-reported sexual dysfunction was most strongly linked with depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and female sex. 

November 02, 2015

Study Examines Factors that May Contribute to Hypersexuality

In a study of European men, hypersexuality—a preoccupation with sexual fantasy or an excessive indulgence in sexual activity—correlated with proneness to sexual boredom and problems with erectile function.

November 02, 2015

Study Examines Issues Related to Prenatal Detection of Trisomies

Cell-free (cf) DNA analysis of maternal blood for trisomies 21, 18 and 13 is superior to other methods of screening, but it’s expensive. One strategy to maximize cfDNA testing at reduced cost is to offer it contingent on the results of the currently used first-trimester test.

October 27, 2015

Restoring Testosterone Rather than Replacing It Helps Safeguard a Man’s Fertility

Restoring testosterone production in men may be as effective as replacing it, without compromising their fertility. Two phase III clinical trials show that a drug that restores the body’s natural production of testosterone has no negative effect on a man’s sperm count while a topical testosterone gel causes a significant drop. The findings, which are published in BJU International, could change the way men are treated for low testosterone.

12:01 AM EDT October 26, 2015

A Cancer Diagnosis Can Lead to Significant Income Losses for Families

A new analysis indicates that when American adults are diagnosed with cancer, they experience significant decreases in the probability of working, in the number of hours they work, and correspondingly, in their incomes.

12:00 AM EDT October 23, 2015

Breastfeeding Difficulties May Increase Risk of Postnatal Depression

In a recent study, stopping breastfeeding due to pain or physical difficulties predicted an increased risk of postnatal depression, but stopping for other reasons, such as social reasons or embarrassment, did not.

12:00 AM EDT October 21, 2015

YouTube Videos on Peripheral Nerve Pain May Misguide Patients

Researchers who combed YouTube for videos regarding peripheral neuropathy, or nerve damage that causes weakness, numbness, and pain in the hands and feet, found 200 videos, but only about half of them were from healthcare professionals, mostly chiropractors.

October 19, 2015

Boosting Levels of a Key Growth Factor May Help Prevent Cardiovascular Disease

New research indicates that low levels of a growth factor called stem cell factor (SCF)—which is thought to be important for blood vessel repair—are linked with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

October 19, 2015

Gout Risk High in Patients with Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea may increase the risk of developing gout, a new study shows.

October 19, 2015

Hearing Aids May Help Keep Hearing-Impaired Older Adults Mentally Sharp

Hearing loss is linked with accelerated cognitive decline in older adults, but the use of hearing aids may help safeguard seniors’ memory and thinking skills.

October 19, 2015

High-Fat Diet May Cause Changes in the Brain that Lead to Anxiety and Depression

A new study in mice reveals that increased body weight and high blood sugar as a result of consuming a high-fat diet may cause anxiety and depressive symptoms and measurable changes in the brain.

October 19, 2015

Low Quality of Life and Depression May Contribute to Erectile Dysfunction in Men with Sleep Apnea

Burdens related to poor sleep may put men with sleep apnea at increased risk of erectile dysfunction.

October 19, 2015

Studies Address Psychological and Behavioral Aspects of Cancer Care

A special issue of Psycho-Oncology highlights the behavioral aspects of cancer care, which involves care provided by clinicians including psychiatrists, psychologists, nurses, and social workers.

October 19, 2015

Study Examines the Effects of Childhood Trauma on Later Sexual Well-Being

Among 96 former Swiss indentured child laborers, 22 individuals showed post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and 53 reported having experienced childhood trauma. Men reported a significantly higher prevalence of both sexual concerns and dysfunctional sexual behavior compared with women.

October 14, 2015

The Dilemma of Screening for Prostate Cancer

Primary care providers are put in a difficult position when screening their male patients for prostate cancer—some guidelines suggest that testing the general population lacks evidence whereas others state that it is appropriate in certain patients. Now a new perspective piece offers some guidance on when to screen patients and how to involve them in decisions about screening and treatment.

12:00 AM EDT October 13, 2015

Cancer Survivors Often Have Poor Diets, Which Can Affect their Long-Term Health

While most cancer survivors in the United States are motivated to seek information about food choices and dietary changes to improve their health, a new study comparing their dietary patterns to federal guidelines indicates that they often fall short. 

October 05, 2015

Africa Faces Rising Rates of Traumatic Brain Injury

New research reveals that the projected estimates of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Africa are high, with a burden of anywhere between approximately 6 to 14 million new cases in 2050. Most cases will result from motor vehicle accidents.

October 05, 2015

Even Surgery May Not Help Patients with Severe Constipation

Current guidelines for treating severe constipation include surgical removal of part of the colon, a procedure called subtotal colectomy. Using national databases of hospital activity in the United States, investigators have discovered that colectomies for constipation nearly tripled over a span of 13 years, from 104 procedures in 1998 to 311 in 2011.

October 05, 2015

Good Communication in the Operating Room Prevents Patient Complications

In a recent study by psychologists and surgeons concerning elective, open abdominal surgeries conducted in 167 patients, communication by the surgical team that was relevant to the procedure was linked with a reduced risk of the development of surgical site infections, whereas irrelevant communication during the closing phase of the procedure was linked with an increased risk of surgical site infections.

October 05, 2015

How Health Professionals Help and Hinder Eradication of Female Genital Mutilation

Migration has transferred the practice of genital mutilation of girls and women to countries where it was not common or does not originate, and the World Health Organization is campaigning to eradicate the practice. A new article highlights how health professionals—including nurses and midwives—both help and hinder eradication and management of female genital mutilation.

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