Wiley.com

Medicine & Healthcare

Press Release RSS Feed RSS

You selected: Medicine & Healthcare

October 13, 2016

Genetic Variants May Affect Breast Cancer Drug Concentrations and Patient Outcomes

In a study of 110 women taking the breast cancer drug anastrozole, there were significant differences in patients’ blood levels of the drug that corresponded with variations in the ABCB1 gene. Furthermore, variants in the CYP19A1 gene were associated with additional joint pain and cancer recurrence in patients.

October 13, 2016

Healthcare Workers Describe their Experiences in Caring for Patients with Ebola Virus Disease

Interviews conducted in 2015 with eight nurses and one physician who had worked in Ebola care in Sierra Leone revealed two themes: ‘Experiencing security by learning to manage risks’; and ‘Developing courage and growth by facing personal fears’. 

October 13, 2016

Starving Pancreatic Cancer Cells: Scientists Identify Potential Pancreatic Cancer Target

Researchers have found that a protein called SLC6A14 is overexpressed by several fold in pancreatic tumors taken from patients and in cancerous pancreatic cells lines compared with normal pancreatic tissue or normal pancreatic cells. SLC6A14 transports amino acids into cells to help with cellular metabolism.

October 13, 2016

Study Results May Help Patients after ACL Surgery

A new study provides critical information on how osteoarthritis may arise after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury.

October 13, 2016

Understanding Why Potentially Inappropriate Medications Are Continued at the End of Life

A recent interview study has uncovered factors that may contribute to the use of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) at the end of life. 

October 11, 2016

Research Findings May Lead to Promising Zika Virus Drug Targets

Following recent outbreaks of Zika virus and the potential health dangers of infection, especially during pregnancy, scientists are striving to rapidly develop effective antiviral drugs that can halt transmission. Investigators who recently performed detailed analyses of the targets of a key enzyme of the Zika virus have uncovered peculiarities of the viral enzyme, called the NS3 protease.

October 11, 2016

Research Points to Ways to Improve the Therapeutic Potential of Stem Cells

Stem cells hold great promise for transforming medical care related to a diverse range of conditions, but the cells often lose some of their therapeutic potential when scientists try to grow and expand them in the laboratory. A new study, however, provides insights on the cellular mechanisms that might be targeted to help certain stem cells—called human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs)—maintain properties needed to make them clinically useful.

12:00 AM EDT October 10, 2016

Costs of Similarly Effective Breast Cancer Treatments Vary Widely

A new study finds that the costs of breast cancer chemotherapy vary widely, even among treatment regimens with similar efficacy, and that patients bear a substantial out-of-pocket burden. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study is the first to examine these cost differences, providing clinicians with accessible information to answer patient questions about their treatment options.

 

7:00 PM EDT October 09, 2016

Are Natural Alternatives to Estrogen Replacement Therapy Safe?

Although individuals often consume natural products because of their potential health benefits, a new review indicates that it is not clear whether the benefits of plant-derived compounds that mimic estrogen outweigh the possible health risks. The findings are published in the British Journal of Pharmacology.

 

4:00 AM EDT October 08, 2016

Obesity-Linked Conditions Are Projected to Rise Sharply in Children

Researchers’ global estimates indicate that by 2025, some 268 million children aged 5 to 17 years may be overweight, including 91 million obese, assuming no policy interventions have proven effective at changing current trends.

 

October 03, 2016

Age-Specific Strategies Are Needed when Caring for Older Individuals with HIV

A new article highlights the differences between older and younger adults living with HIV, and offers age-specific strategies on how to provide care.

October 03, 2016

Antibiotics May Be Inappropriate for Uncomplicated Diverticulitis

Antibiotics are advised in most guidelines on diverticulitis, which arises when one or more small pouches in the digestive tract become inflamed or infected. Results from a randomized trial question the effectiveness of this practice, however.

October 03, 2016

Certain Alternative Therapies May Help Patients with Bowel Disorders

A new review looks at the evidence behind the effectiveness of complementary or alternative therapies—including probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, fiber, and herbal medicinal products—for the treatment of bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional constipation, and ulcerative colitis.

 

October 03, 2016

Clinical Trial Tests Spinal Manipulation Therapy for Migraines

Manual-therapy randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are difficult to perform because it’s challenging to conceal a placebo when patients are able to physically feel a treatment that’s being delivered. Now, though, researchers have successfully completed the first manual-therapy RCT with a documented successful blinding. The three-armed trial evaluated the efficacy of chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (CSMT) in the treatment of migraine versus placebo (sham chiropractic) and control (usual drug treatment).

October 03, 2016

Making Medications Safer for Newborns

Although new drugs must be shown to be both safe and effective for approval by the Food and Drug Administration, sick newborns receive most of their drug treatment off-label and without the evidence provided for adults and older children. A new editorial looks at the challenges of performing clinical trials in newborns, from the reluctance of parents to enroll their infants to the lack of experience of pediatricians and neonatologists in conducting clinical research.

October 03, 2016

Many Liver Transplant Candidates Have Deficits in Physical Activity that Are Missed by Clinicians

A new study found that patients waiting for a liver transplant tend to be highly sedentary. Also, patients’ self-assessments of their physical activity, and even their doctors’ assessments, do not reliably indicate patients’ actual physical performance.

October 03, 2016

Physical Activity May Help Preserve Lung Function in Individuals with Asthma

In a study of adults with asthma, active individuals had slightly less lung function decline than inactive individuals. 

October 03, 2016

Serious Liver-Related Condition on the Rise in the U.S.

A new analysis reveals that cirrhosis and acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF, a deterioration of liver function in patients with cirrhosis that results in the failure of one or more organs) represent a substantial and increasing health and economic burden in the United States.

October 03, 2016

Should Video Monitors Be Used to Detect Night-time Seizures in Patients with Epilepsy?

Following a sudden death at a residential care unit, the Dutch Health and Care Inspectorate advised to intensify the use of video monitoring at the unit. Researchers now report that such video monitoring can help detect seizures at night, but the costs are high.

 

September 28, 2016

Some Herbal and Dietary Supplements Can Be Toxic to the Liver

A new review based on a research symposium sponsored by the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease and the National Institutes of Health highlights the potentially damaging effects of herbal and dietary supplements (HDSs) on the liver.