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April 05, 2016

Fatty Liver Disease Is Common and Linked with Certain Risk Factors in Liver Transplant Recipients

Researchers have characterized the prevalence and risk factors of fatty liver disease in patients who undergo liver transplantation. The findings, which are published in Liver Transplantation, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, could have important implications for safeguarding transplant recipients’ health.

April 04, 2016

Do Differences in Anatomy Matter for Achieving Orgasm?

A recent review of the medical literature reveals that differences in anatomy may help explain why some individuals experience orgasms more successfully than others.

April 04, 2016

Heavy Drinking Endangers the Health of Liver Transplants

Alcoholic liver disease is a major indication for liver transplantation, but up to 20% of patients experience severe alcoholic relapse. New research shows that such relapse can cause significant damage to newly transplanted livers.

April 04, 2016

Review Examines Functioning, Disability, and Health in Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder

A recent review and analysis of the medical literature has helped determine what constitutes the relevant aspects of ability and disability in individuals of all ages with autism spectrum disorder. The results will provide clarity as investigators conduct basic and applied research and as clinicians diagnose and treat affected patients.

April 04, 2016

Subclinical Epileptic Bursts in the Brain May Affect Patients’ Driving

Epileptic discharges in the brain that are unaccompanied by obvious clinical signs are regarded as subclinical or interictal. A new study found that such bursts can prolong the reaction time and increase virtual accidents of patients taking a car driving computer test.

April 04, 2016

Technique May Reduce Complications in Elderly Patients Undergoing Bladder Cancer Surgery

A retrospective study indicates that for certain elderly patients undergoing surgery for bladder cancer, diverting urine from the bladder can be safely achieved with what’s known as a cutaneous ureterostomy with a single stoma rather than the commonly used ileal conduit.

April 04, 2016

Young Arthritis Patients Have Unique Concerns about Treatment

A new study funded by Arthritis Research UK indicates that teens and young adults with inflammatory arthritis see treatment as presenting both an opportunity and a threat to their desire to lead a ‘normal’ life. They describe a wide range of consequences—physical, emotional, social, and vocational—arising from their treatment.

12:00 AM EDT April 01, 2016

Is There a Link Between Oral Health and the Rate of Cognitive Decline?

Better oral hygiene and regular dental visits may play a role in slowing cognitive decline as people age, although evidence is not definitive enough to suggest that one causes the other. The findings, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, come from the first systematic review of studies focused on oral health and cognition—two important areas of research as the older adult population continues to grow, with some 36% of people over age 70 already living with cognitive impairments.

March 30, 2016

Researchers Uncover Key Scientific and Statistical Errors in Obesity Studies

A special statistical series in the journal Obesity identifies common scientific and statistical errors in obesity-relate studies, challenges assumptions about weight loss, and calls for increased application of control arms in obesity intervention studies.

12:00 AM EDT March 28, 2016

Choosing to Die at Home Does Not Hasten Death for Patients with Terminal Cancer

A large study from Japan found that cancer patients who died at home tended to live longer than those who died in hospitals. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings suggest that oncologists should not hesitate to refer patients for home-based palliative care simply because less medical treatment may be provided.

8:30 PM EDT March 24, 2016

Curcumin May Help Overcome Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

New research indicates that curcumin—a substance in turmeric that is best known as one of the main components of curry powder—may help fight drug-resistant tuberculosis. In Asia, turmeric is used to treat many health conditions and it has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and perhaps even anticancer properties.

March 23, 2016

Chronic Diseases May Negatively Affect the Mental Health of Poor and Middle-Income Adults

In a study of more than 8,000 adults, those with a chronic health condition such as diabetes or asthma were more likely to report psychological distress and functional impairment if they were residents of poor or middle-income households. There was no significant association between chronic disease and distress for individuals from higher-income households.

 

March 23, 2016

Ultrasound-Estimated Fat Content in Muscles May Be an Indicator of Physical Health

Ultrasound-estimated percent intramuscular fat of muscles in the lower extremity was inversely associated with physical activity level and positively associated with body mass index in a recent study.

March 22, 2016

New Method Measures Nicotine Delivery from E-Cigarettes

The effectiveness of e-cigarettes as a smoking substitute will likely rely on whether they can consistently provide the amount of nicotine a smoker needs to resist the desire to return to traditional cigarettes.

March 21, 2016

Out-of-Hospital Births Are on the Rise

United States’ out-of-hospital births increased to nearly 60,000 in 2014, continuing a decade-long increase. Data from the National Center for Health Statistics indicates that out-of-hospital births increased from 0.87% of US births in 2004 to 1.50% in 2014, an increase of 72%. Out-of-hospital birth rates increased for all race/ethnic groups, but most rapidly for non-Hispanic white women.

March 21, 2016

Research Advance May Lead to New Treatments for Glaucoma

Researchers have developed a tool to not only model the underlying disease mechanisms of glaucoma, but also to help discover and test new pharmacological strategies to combat the neurodegeneration that occurs in patients with glaucoma.

March 21, 2016

Surgery For Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease Found Safe

A new analysis indicates that death rates and the need for additional operations following laparoscopic surgery for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease are very low.

March 21, 2016

Transplant Drug Helpful for Patients with Progressive Liver Condition

New research indicates that mycophenolate mofetil, a drug that is usually used to prevent rejection after kidney, heart or liver transplant, seems safe and effective in treating autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), a serious chronic liver disease that mainly affects women.

March 21, 2016

Why Do Sunbathers Live Longer than Those Who Avoid the Sun?

New research looks into the paradox that women who sunbathe are likely to live longer than those who avoid the sun, even though sunbathers are at an increased risk of developing skin cancer.

8:00 PM EDT March 16, 2016

Health effects of sit-stand desks and interventions aimed to reduce sitting at work are still unproven

An updated Cochrane Review, published today in the Cochrane Library, says that the benefits of a variety of interventions intended to reduce sitting at work are very uncertain.