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May 05, 2016

New Method Helps Diagnose Neurological Disorder that Requires Early Treatment

Researchers have developed a quick and simple method for measuring bile acids in biological fluids that can be used to rapidly diagnosis a severe fat storage disorder that can lead to liver disease in infancy and neurological dysfunction starting in childhood or early adult life.

May 03, 2016

Many European Schools Face Barriers to Providing Mental Health Support to Students

In a cross-national study of what European schools are doing to support student mental health and well-being, 47% of surveyed schools indicated that mental health provision is a high/essential priority, but more than half did not implement a school policy regarding mental health.

May 03, 2016

Medical Conditions Are More Common in Women Who Are Sexually Abused

Researchers have found that a variety of conditions are more common in women before and after sexual assault.

May 03, 2016

Newspapers Often Publish False Depictions of Gout

A new analysis reveals that popular newspaper articles depict gout as a self-inflicted condition that is socially embarrassing and the focus of humor.

May 03, 2016

Obesity Rates Are Not Declining in US Youth

A clear and significant increase in obesity continued from 1999 through 2014, according to an analysis of data on United States children and adolescents age 2 to 19 years.

May 03, 2016

Ovary Removal May Increase the Risk of Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer may rise in women who have their ovaries removed, according to new research.

May 03, 2016

Patient-Physician Communication Is Critical for Prostate Cancer Survivors’ Health

For prostate cancer patients who had their prostates surgically removed, patient-physician communication was key for helping them cope with their disease and for improving their health-related quality of life.

May 03, 2016

Ultrasound-Estimated Fat Content in Muscles May Be an Indicator of Physical Health

Ultrasound-estimated percent intramuscular fat of muscles in the lower extremity was inversely associated with physical activity level and positively associated with body mass index in a recent study.

12:00 AM EDT May 02, 2016

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy May Help Reduce Memory Problems in Cancer Survivors Who Have Received Chemotherapy

A new analysis indicates that a type of psychotherapy delivered by videoconference may help prevent some of the long-term memory issues caused by chemotherapy. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings point to a noninvasive way to help cancer survivors manage some of the negative effects of their treatment.

April 29, 2016

Researchers Analyze Potentially Hazardous Dental Drill Debris under Composite Fillings

While dental drills, or burs, are used extensively in dentistry to mechanically prepare tooth structures for fillings, little is known about the bur debris left behind in the teeth and whether it poses potential health risks to patients.

12:00 AM EDT April 28, 2016

Rosacea Linked to a Slightly Increased Risk of Dementia

A new study has uncovered an increased risk of dementia—in particular Alzheimer’s disease—in patients with rosacea. Importantly, the risk was highest in older patients and in patients where rosacea was diagnosed by a hospital dermatologist. The findings are published in the Annals of Neurology, a journal of the American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society.

April 26, 2016

Aspirin May Help Prevent Bile Duct Cancer

Regular use of aspirin was linked with a significantly reduced risk of developing bile duct cancer, also called cholangiocarcinoma, in a recent study. The findings, which are published in the journal Hepatology, indicate that additional research on the potential of aspirin for preventing bile duct cancer is warranted.

April 21, 2016

Risk of Liver Cancer from Hepatitis B Persists Even after Clearing the Virus

Long-term infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can cause liver inflammation and increase the risk of liver cancer.

April 20, 2016

Hair Analysis Is a Flawed Forensic Technique

Since 1989, 74 people who were convicted of serious crimes, in large part due to microscopic hair comparisons, were later exonerated by post-conviction DNA analysis. 

April 20, 2016

Review Assesses Published Research on Brain Changes Associated with Autism

A recent review that examined all published studies on anatomical abnormalities in the brains of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder found substantial discrepancy throughout the literature regarding the reported presence and significance of neuroanatomical findings.

April 20, 2016

Rituximab Is Superior to Fingolimod for Certain Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

A new study indicates that rituximab is more effective than fingolimod for preventing relapses in patients with highly active multiple sclerosis switching from treatment with natalizumab.

April 19, 2016

Wiley Announces Staying Sharp For Dummies

Insights and actionable information on keeping your brain sharp as you age

April 15, 2016

Monitoring Breathing: Paper-based electrical sensor developed to monitor respiration rate

A simple but effective sensor for monitoring the respiration rate of individuals has been created. Taking advantage of the hygroscopic character of ordinary paper, scientists at Harvard University have developed an electrical sensor to detect the periodic changes of humidity by breathing in and out. As they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the respiration data can be transmitted to and collected by nearby smartphones or tablet computers for further processing, storage, or transmittance to practical therapists. A simple face mask carrying the sensor system and worn in hospital wards may thus save lives.

April 13, 2016

Poor Lubrication: Astringent mouthfeel of wine results from a lubrication failure in the mouth

We are all familiar with that strange feeling in the mouth after a sip of red wine or tea, or a bite of unripe fruit. It has been described as dry, leathery, or even furry. This astringent effect is caused by tannins or polyphenolic compounds that bind to mucins, lubricating proteins in the mucus membranes of the mouth. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a Chinese and Korean research team has now shown the relationship between astringency and disrupted lubrication of the oral cavity.

12:00 AM EDT April 11, 2016

Being Married May Help Prolong Survival in Cancer Patients, with Varying Effects by Race and Place of Birth

New research has uncovered a link between being married and living longer among cancer patients, with the beneficial effect of marriage differing by race/ethnicity and place of birth. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings have important public health implications, given the rising numbers of unmarried individuals in the United States in addition to the growing aging population.