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August 24, 2011

Is Perfectionism an Attribute or Detriment?

 

The Perfectionist's Handbook by Dr. Jeff Szymanski helps readers navigate out of the "perfectionism paradox". If your intentions are good (wanting to excel) and the outcomes you want are reasonable (to feel competent and satisfied), why would perfectionism backfire and result in unhappiness and stress?

 

August 03, 2011

LOVING SOMEONE WHO HAS DEMENTIA

A new and proven way to cope with loved ones who are suffering through dementia -- without destroying your own sanity or health. Dr. Boss presents a method for managing caring for patients with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia, when a person you love both "is" and "is increasingly not" the person you once knew.

July 27, 2011

British Academy and Wiley-Blackwell Announce Result of 2011 Wiley Prize

American developmental psychologist, Dr. Michael Tomasello, has been named as this year’s recipient of the Wiley Prize in Psychology, awarded by the British Academy in partnership with Wiley-Blackwell, the scientific, technical, medical and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (NYSE: JWa, JWb).

July 07, 2011

Author of 'Such Stuff as Dreams' on Radio 4 Today Programme

Is reading fiction good for you?

June 21, 2011

Creating Your Perfect Family Size

This groundbreaking book offers answers to crucial questions that have a large impact on family success and well-being. The author has been researching and treating couples for more than twenty years, addressing such critical issues as: When should you have kids? How many and why? Can you afford a family? What's the best interval between children's birth in a family? How does your work life influence how many kids to have? What's the impact of divorce, remarriage and blended families on the decision to have more kids?

June 09, 2011

Sucking Up to the Boss May Move You Up and Keep You Healthy

Savvy career minded individuals have known for some time that ingratiating oneself to the boss and others – perhaps more commonly known as ‘sucking up’– can help move them up the corporate ladder more quickly. However, a recent study published in the Journal of Management Studies suggests that politically savvy professionals who use ingratiation as a career aid may also avoid the psychological distress that comes to others who are less cunning about their workplace behavior.

June 03, 2011

Letters from home may help prevent post-traumatic stress disorder in happily married soldiers

A new study from the Journal of Traumatic Stress finds that for active-duty male soldiers in the U.S. Army who are happily married, communicating frequently with one's spouse through letters and emails during deployment may protect against the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms after returning home.

April 18, 2011

The following authors are available to comment as resources on stories about the tragedy in Japan

Click through to get a list of our author experts available to discuss the nuclear situation, structural engineering, environmental impacts, business and finance, the geography of the region as well as lifestyle topics including grief, depression, parenting, and giving back

April 13, 2011

Farmers with acute chest pain are uncertain how and when to seek help

A pilot study of the prevalence of cardiac risk factors in a group of agricultural workers and of their decision-making abilities with regard to when and how they would seek help when experiencing chest pain has found that most put themselves at risk of dying.

April 11, 2011

Glaucoma patients report a wide range of emotional and psychological changes

Fear of the unknown is one of the greatest issues facing patients with glaucoma - the second leading cause of blindness worldwide after cataracts - according to research in the April issue of the Journal of Advanced Nursing.  People also worry about how the eye disease, which can be hereditary, will affect other members of their family.

April 07, 2011

Is beauty found in the whites of the eyes? Study reveals ‘red eyes’ associated with the sad, unhealthy and unattractive

Beauty is said to be in the eye of the beholder, but a new study reveals that the reverse is also true; unattractiveness is in the eye of the beheld. Research published in Ethology finds that people with bloodshot eyes are considered sadder, unhealthier and less attractive than people whose eye whites are untinted, a cue which is uniquely human.

April 05, 2011

How Materialistic Advertising Messages Negatively Shape the Female Body Image

Psychological research has consistently shown that women feel unhappy with their body after looking at images of thin, idealized models, which are typically represented in the media. However, today's consumer culture and media promote not only the ideal of perfect beauty, but also that of the material affluent lifestyle, both of which are commonly depicted together, and highlight the benefits of beauty and of owning material goods to one's personal success and fame. A new study from the British Journal of Social Psychology is the first to examine the impact of materialistic messages and values - the desire for financial success and an affluent lifestyle on women's feelings about their own body.

March 30, 2011

Educational Development Stunted by Teenage Fatherhood

Public interest in the issue of teenage childbearing has recently increased, largely due to increases in both the teen pregnancy rate and the teen birth rate. A new study from Economic Inquiry examines the negative educational and economic outcomes of teenage fatherhood, a topic far less researched than teenage motherhood.

March 23, 2011

Interest in Toys Predicts Effectiveness of Autism Treatment in Toddlers

New study shows that toddlers diagnosed with autism who played with a limited number of toys showed more improvement in their communication skills following parent-guided treatment than those receiving other community-based treatments

March 15, 2011

The New Adulthood: Extended Parental Support as a Safety Net

Minneapolis, MN —March 15, 2011—A new study from the Journal of Marriage and Family shows that contrary to popular anxieties about slacker young adults who refuse to grow up, or indulgent parents who stifle their adult children’s development by continuing to support them, there is evidence that parental assistance in early adulthood promotes progress toward autonomy and self-reliance.

March 02, 2011

An Appeal to the Caregiving Values of Rural Women for Breast Cancer Prevention

KNOXVILLE, TN —March 2, 2011 — In an effort to develop strategies for breast health awareness in rural populations researchers asked the question, “What message strategies will motivate Appalachian women to attend to breast health issues and become actively involved in their own breast health?” A new study published in the Journal of Consumer Affairs finds that two types of reasons motivate rural Appalachian women to perform breast health self-examinations, get mammograms, and to talk with doctors about their breast health.

March 01, 2011

Building Trust with Cooperative Witnesses in a Crime Investigation

According to major investigative interviewing protocols police investigators are expected to create a comfortable environment before interviewing adult witnesses to a crime. Police often fail to spend time building rapport with adult witnesses before a criminal interview, possibly in an effort to save time. An article published in a forthcoming issue of Applied Cognitive Psychology shows that the additional time spent on building rapport (in particular using verbal techniques) may prevent inaccuracies in witness accounts and decrease the witness’ susceptibility to post-event misinformation.

 

February 16, 2011

Female Topics Encourage Girls to Study Science

Girls are more interested in studying science if topics are presented in a female friendly way

February 01, 2011

Arranged Unions and Distrust: The Influence of Parental Choice on Mate Guarding

Groningen, The Netherlands —February 1, 2011— Mate guarding is classified as excessive or unwarranted jealous or protective behavior towards a spouse or mate. This is common among many different species and can be useful to defend territory, guarantee paternity, or prevent disease. The authors of a new study published in Personal Relationships have discovered that this behavior is more common in societies which practice arranged marriages or in cultures that place a high value on parental influence in the choice of mate for their children. Furthermore, the authors comment on the fact that mate guarding is not an exclusively male phenomenon, and women can be just as forceful in protecting their monogamous relationships.