Thank you for visiting us. We are currently updating our shopping cart and regret to advise that it will be unavailable until September 1, 2014. We apologise for any inconvenience and look forward to serving you again.

Wiley
Wiley.com
Print this page Share

Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology: From Theory to Practice, 3rd Edition

ISBN: 978-0-470-01257-4
394 pages
May 2006
Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology: From Theory to Practice, 3rd Edition (0470012579) cover image
Theoretical and practice-oriented,Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology offers a concise, comprehensive, review of the knowledge, concepts and practice of child and adolescent clinical psychology.

This fully revised and updated edition of ‘Clinical Child Psychology ’, now incorporates a fuller account of the range of clinical problems of adolescence, together with an expanded account of the major developmental and psychosocial disorders, such as autism, ADHD, and conduct disorder. Each chapter considers a different category of problem or disorder, and covers issues of diagnosis, clinical and developmental features, causes, interventions and outcomes.

  • Now covers adolescence as well as childhood
  • Updated coverage of major developmental disorders
  • Included in the Wiley Series in Clinical Psychology
See More
About the Author.

Preface.

Acknowledgements.

Organisation of the Book.

Part I: Introduction – The Nature of the Problem.

Chapter 1: Clinical Diagnosis and Assessment: Theoretical Considerations.

Chapter 2: Clinical Assessment: Theory into Practice.

Chapter 3: Psychiatric and Psychosocial Treatment: Part I Early Interventions.

Chapter 4: Psychiatric and Psychosocial Treatment: Part II Contemporary Approaches.

Part II: From Conception to the Preschool Period.

Chapter 5: Prenatal to Perinatal Development.

Chapter 6: Infant Development.

Chapter 7: Problems of the Preschool Period (15 Months to 5 or 6 Years).

Part III: The School-Going Period: Externalising and Internalising Problems.

Chapter 8: The School-Going Period: Externalising Problems.

Chapter 9: The School-Going Period: Internalising Problems.

Part IV: Adolescence to Young Adulthood.

Chapter 10: Early Adolescence (11 Years to 14 or 15).

Chapter 11: The Transition from Adolescence into Young Adulthood (Ages 14

to 18).

Part V: Developmental Disorders, Serious Illness and Trauma.

Chapter 12: Developmental Disorders.

Chapter 13: Chronic Disability and Illness: Health Care Problems.

Chapter 14: Traumatic Conditions and Experiences of Childhood.

Epilogue.

Appendix I.

Appendix II.

Appendix III.

Appendix IV.

Appendix V.

References.

Index.

See More
Martin Herbert is Professor Emeritus at Exeter University. He was previously a lecturer and clinician at the Institute of Psychiatry in London. This was followed by the post of Director of the School of Social Work and Professor and Head of the School of Psychology and clinical training at Leicester University. He later joined the National Health Service full time and was in charge of the Mental Health Service for children in Plymouth. This post was succeeded by a move to Exeter, where he founded and directed the Doctoral Course in Clinical Psychology as Professor of Clinical and Community Psychology. He was appointed to the Consultant Clinical Psychology post in the Child and Adolescent Department at the Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Health Care Trust. For several years he was a Mental Health Act Commissioner. He now specialises in personal injury psycho-legal work and the evaluation of parent training courses, one of which (the Child Wise Behaviour Management Programme) he codesigned for use in Sure Start and NHS settings. He has published books and journal articles on the psychological problems of children, adolescents and adults. Many of his books have been translated into European and Asian languages. Among his most recent books are Typical and Atypical Development: from Conception to Adolescence and Development of Children and Adolescents: Prevention, Treatment and Training. He was awarded the Monte Shapiro prize by the British Psychological Society for his distinguished contribution to clinical psychology.
See More
Back to Top