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The Evaluation of Child Sexual Abuse Allegations: A Comprehensive Guide to Assessment and Testimony

ISBN: 978-0-470-47869-1
600 pages
December 2008
The Evaluation of Child Sexual Abuse Allegations: A Comprehensive Guide to Assessment and Testimony (0470478691) cover image
The editors of this collection are experienced practitioners and teachers of forensic psychology. They have collected chapters written by nationally and internationally respected experts in applied research and practice to provide others with their best advice and knowledge on conducting evaluations for and testifying in court.
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Preface.

Contributors.

Introduction: Improved Forensic Interviewing: The Legacy of the McMartin Preschool Case (John E. B. Myers).

PART I APPLYING CLINICAL DECISION RESEARCH TO INCREASE THE ACCURACY OF SEXUAL ABUSE EVALUATIONS.

Chapter 1 Methods for the Identification of Sexually Abused Children: Issues and Needed Features for Abuse Indicators (David Faust, Ana J. Bridges, and David C. Ahern).

Chapter 2 Methods for the Identification of Sexually Abused Children: Reframing the Clinician’s Task and Recognizing Its Disparity with Research on Indicators (Ana J. Bridges, David Faust, and David C. Ahern).

Chapter 3 Methods for the Identification of Sexually Abused Children: Suggestions for Clinical Work and Research (David Faust, Ana J. Bridges, and David C. Ahern).l

PART II PROFESSIONAL ROLES AND ETHICS.

Chapter 4 Professional Roles: Key to Accuracy and Effectiveness (Charles R. Clark).

Chapter 5 Ethical Issues in Child Sexual Abuse Evaluations (Gerald P. Koocher).

PART III CHILDREN’S BEHAVIOR: CRITICAL FACTORS.

Chapter 6 Child Development: Normative Sexual and Nonsexual Behaviors That May Be Confused with Symptoms of Sexual Abuse (Debra A. Poole and Michele A. Wolfe).

Chapter 7 The Continuum of Children’s Sexual Behavior: Discriminative Categories and the Need for Public Policy Change (Jessica Gurley, Kathryn Kuehnle, and H. D. Kirkpatrick).

PART IV CHILDREN’S REPORTS: FUNDAMENTAL ISSUES.

Chapter 8 Normative Memory Development and the Child Witness (J. Zoe Klemfuss and Stephen Ceci).

Chapter 9 Children’s Resistance to Suggestion (LaTonya S. Harris, Gail S. Goodman, Else Marie Augusti, Yoojin Chae, and Deborah Alley).

Chapter 10 Repressed and Recovered Memories during Childhood and Adolescence (Andrea F. Greenhoot and Monica Tsethlikai).

PART V FORENSIC INTERVIEW OF THE CHILD.

Chapter 11 Forensic Child Sexual Abuse Evaluations: Accuracy, Ethics, and Admissibility (Steve Herman).

Chapter 12 Children’s Suggestibility: Areas of Consensus and Controversy (Lindsay C. Malloy and Jodi A. Quas).

Chapter 13 Forensic Interviews with Children: A Two-Way Street: Supporting Interviewers in Adhering to Best Practice Recommendations and Enhancing Children’s Capabilities in Forensic Interviews (Deirdre Brown and Michael E. Lamb).

Chapter 14 Repeated Interviewing: A Critical Evaluation of the Risks and Potential Benefits (David La Rooy, Michael E. Lamb, and Margaret-Ellen Pipe).

PART VI TECHNIQUES: INTERFERENCE VERSUS FACILITATION.

Chapter 15 Dolls, Drawing, Body Diagrams, and Other Props: Role of Props in Investigative Interviews (Margaret-Ellen Pipe and Karen Salmon).

Chapter 16 Unsupported Assessment Techniques in Child Sexual Abuse Evaluations (Daniel Murrie, David A. Martindale, and Monica Epstein).

PART VII A NATIONAL MOVEMENT: CHILD INTERVIEW CENTERS.

Chapter 17 The Child Advocacy Center Model (Mary Connell).

Chapter 18 The Extended Forensic Evaluation (Mary Connell).

PART VIII ANALYSIS OF THE DATA: OPINIONS AND THE COURT.

Chapter 19 The Return of the Ultimate Issue: Talking to the Court in Child Sexual Abuse Cases (Daniel W. Shuman and William G. Austin).

Chapter 20 Jurors and Professionals in the Legal System: What Do They Know and What They Should Know about Interviewing Child Witnesses (Julie A. Buck and Amye R. Warren).

Appendix: Investigative Interview Protocol.

Author Index.

Subject Index.

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KATHRYN KUEHNLE, PhD, is Research Assistant Professor with the Department of Mental Health Law & Policy at Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida, and is in private practice in Florida. She specializes in evaluating and treating cases involving child maltreatment and is the author of Assessing Allegations of Child Sexual Abuse.

MARY CONNELL, EdD, ABPP, is certified as a forensic psychologist by the American Board of Professional Psychology. She is in independent practice in¿Texas and provides training on parenting assessment and forensic ethics in workshops sponsored by the American Academy of Forensic Psychology. She is coauthor of Ethical Practice in Forensic Psychology: A Systematic Model for Decision Making.

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"An excellent volume this is...I conclude that this volume sets a standard with which future work will be compared, and it will serve a huge heuristic function." (PsycCRITIQUES, 7/22/09)

“An excellent volume this is, but it is also a disturbing one. We have had some of the best minds working on the psychology of child sexual abuse consistently telling us that we know little. We don’t know the extent of child sexual abuse (American Psychological Association, 2001b). We don’t know of any psychological indicators that are both valid and practically useful for substantiation of child sexual abuse in specific cases (American Psychological Association, 2001a). We do not have significant data supporting the repressed and/or recovered memory of traumatic events (McNally & Geraerts, 2009). But thanks to the many contributors to The Evaluation of Child Sexual Abuse Allegations: A Comprehensive Guide to Assessment and Testimony, we see that there is much we do know and how we may begin to know more.... I conclude that this volume sets a standard with which future work will be compared, and it will serve a huge heuristic function.”
Richard M. Bloom (PsycCRITIQUES (Journal of the American Psychological Association) July 2009)

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