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E-book

iPhone Application Development For Dummies

ISBN: 978-0-470-52252-3
384 pages
August 2010
iPhone Application Development For Dummies (0470522526) cover image

Here's the fun and easy way to learn how to create your own iPhone applications

Whether you're a professional developer or an iPhone user with a knack for technology, this plain English guide shows you how easy it can be to create your own cool iPhone and iPod touch apps. The open iPhone SDK offers a world of opportunities, and with the information in iPhone Application Development For Dummies, you can get in on the fun and profit.

You don't need high-level programming skills to create iPhone apps. iPhone Application Development For Dummies walks you through the fundamentals for building a variety of applications using Objective-C and covers the critical steps for creating applications that get accepted into the AppStore.

  • Apple's open SDK for the iPhone allows any developer to create iPhone applications
  • This guide helps you develop new applications for use on your own iPhone or for release to other iPhone and iPod Touch users
  • Covers small and large-scale application development
  • Shows how to develop usingObjective-C
  • Enables both novice and experienced programmers to leverage the marketing power of the open iPhone SDK

The iPhone is the hottest smart phone around, and with iPhone Application Development For Dummies, you can create cool new apps to make it even more exciting.

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Introduction.

Part I: Getting Started.

Chapter 1: Creating Killer iPhone Applications.

Chapter 2: Looking Behind the Screen.

Chapter 3: Enlisting in the Developer Corps.

Part II: Using the iPhone Development Tools.

Chapter 4: Getting to Know the SDK.

Chapter 5: Building the User Interface.

Chapter 6: While Your Application Is Running.

Part III: From “Gee, That’s a Good Idea” to the App Store.

Chapter 7: Actually Writing Code.

Chapter 8: Entering and Managing Data.

Chapter 9: Saving Data and Creating a Secret Button.

Chapter 10: Using the Debugger.

Chapter 11: Buttoning It Down and Calling Home.

Chapter 12: Checking Your Code Using Xcode’s Instruments Application.

Chapter 13: Death, Taxes, and the iPhone Provisioning.

Part IV: An Industrial-Strength Application.

Chapter 14: Designing Your Application.

Chapter 15: Setting the Table.

Chapter 16: Enhancing the User Experience.

Chapter 17: Creating Controllers and Their Models.

Part V: The Part of Tens.

Chapter 18: Top Ten Apple Sample Applications (with Code!).

Chapter 19: Ten Ways to Be a Happy Developer.

Index.

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Neal Goldstein is a recognized leader in making state-of-the-art and cuttingedge technologies practical for commercial and enterprise development. He was one of the fi rst technologists to work with commercial developers at fi rms such as Apple Computer, Lucasfi lm, and Microsoft to develop commercial applications using object-based programming technologies. He was a pioneer in moving that approach into the corporate world for developers at Liberty Mutual Insurance, USWest (now Verizon), National Car Rental, EDS, and Continental Airlines, showing them how object-oriented programming could solve enterprise-wide problems. His book (with Jeff Alger) on objectoriented development, Developing Object-Oriented Software for the Macintosh (Addison Wesley, 1992), introduced the idea of scenarios and patterns to developers. He was an early advocate of the Microsoft .NET framework, and successfully introduced it into many enterprises, including Charles Schwab. He was one of the earliest developers of Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), and as Senior Vice President of Advanced Technology and the Chief Architect at Charles Schwab, he built an integrated SOA solution that spanned the enterprise, from desktop PCs to servers to complex network mainframes. (He holds three patents as a result.) As one of IBM’s largest customers, he introduced them to SOA at the enterprise level and encouraged them to head in that direction. He is currently leading an iPhone startup that is developing an application to help minimize the cost (and pain) of global travel for both leisure and corporate travelers.
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