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It s Okay to Manage Your Boss: The Step-by-Step Program for Making the Best of Your Most Important Relationship at Work

ISBN: 978-0-470-60530-1
208 pages
September 2010, Jossey-Bass
It s Okay to Manage Your Boss: The Step-by-Step Program for Making the Best of Your Most Important Relationship at Work (0470605308) cover image

Get what you need from your boss

In this follow-up to the bestselling It's Okay to Be the Boss, Bruce Tulgan argues that as managers demand more and more from their employees, they are also providing them with less guidance than ever before. Since the number one factor in employee success is the relationship between employees and their immediate managers, employees need to take greater responsibility for getting the most out of that relationship. Drawing on years of experience training managers and employees, Tulgan reveals the four essential things employees should get from their bosses to guarantee success at work.

  • Shows employees how to ask for what they need to succeed in their high-pressure jobs
  • Shatters previously held beliefs about how employees should manage up
  • Outlines what employees must get from their managers: clear expectations; the skills needed to perform their jobs; honest feedback, recognition or rewards

A novel approach to managing up, It's Okay to Manage Your Boss is an invaluable resource for employees who want to work more effectively with their managers.

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Chapter 1: Refuse to be undermanaged.

Chapter 2: The first person you have to manage every day is yourself.

Chapter 3: Get in the habit of managing your boss every day.

Chapter 4: Take it one boss at a time, one day at a time.

Chapter 5: Get clear expectations from your boss every step of the way.

Chapter 6: Get your hands on the resources you need to succeed.

Chapter 7: Track your performance every step of the way.

Chapter 8: Go the extra mile to earn credit and more rewards.

Chapter 9: Dealing with the most common jerk boss scenario.

Chapter 10: Start managing your boss today.

Acknowledgments.

About the Author.

Index.

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Bruce Tulgan is an adviser to business leaders all over the world and a sought-after speaker and seminar leader. He is the founder of RainmakerThinking, a workplace research and training firm, and has written for the New York Times, USA Today, Harvard Business Review, and HR Magazine. He is the author of numerous books, including the best-selling It's Okay to Be the Boss, the classic Managing Generation X, and Not Everyone Gets a Trophy. Tulgan holds a fourth-degree black belt in karate and is married to Debby Applegate, winner of the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for Biography.

For more information about the book and to view Bruce Tulgan's video newsletter, please visit www.rainmakerthinking.com.

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"It's Okay to Manage Your Boss provides practical, relevant strategies you can use to create a successful partnership with your manager. A terrific follow-up to It's Okay to Be the Boss. Now both manager and employee have effective tools to get the most from their relationship!"
—Angela Hornsby, vice president human resources, Applebee's Services Inc.

"Once again Tulgan tackles the myths in today's undermanaged workplace with practical and straightforward guidance. I have been a boss for nearly thirty years and I have not seen a more realistic and practical way to improve workplace relationships and career results. If you are-or want to be a high performer- read this book!"
—Jon Morrison, president and general manager, Meritor WABCO Vehicle Control Systems

"Tulgan's latest book presents insightful information and practical tips to help anyone successfully deal with undermanagement-a problem many employees encounter in corporations and organizations. In an engaging, clear, warm, and direct manner, Bruce presents common sense advice and a set of tools and ideas that empower self-management as well as 'other' management! A must read for anybody interested in professional growth."
—Tiane Mitchell Gordon, senior vice president, Office of Diversity & Inclusion, AOL, LLC

"Tulgan has a remarkable ability to translate complicated concepts into easily understood and actionable steps. His common sense approach coupled with his enthusiasm and 'can do' attitude give confidence to all who follow his work."
—Victoria Nolan, managing director, Yale Repertory Theatre, and deputy dean, Yale School of Drama

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September 28, 2010
It's Okay to Manage Your Boss

Most people agree: this is not the recession of their parents’ generation. Jobs are scarce and the competition for them—even for less than desirable positions—is more intense than ever before.  Companies are cutting back on overhead expenses and staff, as they ride out the financial crisis, and many of today’s employees are overworked, often performing the job of two or three people for no additional pay.  Research shows that many employees feel powerless and won’t complain about their circumstances, holding onto their job is akin to clinging to a life boat, added to this, is the epidemic of undermanagement, which makes for a precarious work environment. 

We’ve all heard about micromanaging but according to Bruce Tulgan, corporate adviser, founder of RainmakerThinking, a research and training firm, and author of the bestseller, It’s Okay To Be The Boss, undermanaging is an equally ruinous work dynamic that contributes to resources being squandered, small conflicts escalating, and the defections of high performing employees.  It’s easy—and common— to blame supervisors for falling short, but they too, are in a difficult position, says Tulgan, because they are talented individuals, often promoted for exhibiting strengths but haven’t a clue how to manage.  “Too many in leadership positions—at all levels—are disengaged from the people that report directly to them on a day-to-day basis,” he says. What’s more, “undermanaging or failing to talk with a team member at least once a week is a disease of epic proportions that must be addressed for a successful and functional workplace.” 

 

In an important new book, IT’S OKAY TO MANAGE YOUR BOSS (Jossey-Bass; September 2010; $23.95), Tulgan reassures suffering employees, that it is indeed acceptable—and advisable—to manage their boss.  By empowering high performers with the tools to improve relationships with their managers, Tulgan provides an invaluable resource for “managing up.” He reveals what employees need from their bosses to promote success at work, like, setting clear expectations, giving honest feedback, and recognition. 

“Although managers are demanding more and more from their employees, they are also providing them with less guidance than ever before,” says Tulgan.  But “employees need to take greater responsibility for getting what they need.”  In IT’S OKAY TO MANAGE YOUR BOSS, Tulgan explores:  

  • extracting a list of clear goals and a concrete timetable to accomplish them;
  • determining the skills and tools needed to meet a manager’s expectations;
  • taking it one boss at a time, one day at a time;
  • earning credit and rewards in exchange for good performance; 
  • dealing with common “jerk boss” scenarios;
  • tracking your own performance every step of the way;

and much more.

In this essential guide, chock-full of tips for working more effectively with managers and helping employees stay in a workplace that is becoming increasingly more diverse, fast-paced and globally connected than ever before, Tulgan illustrates that workers can—and must—take control of their professional futures.

In IT'S OKAY TO MANAGE YOUR BOSS, Tulgan debunks the ten myths about how one should be managed and how to manage up. He then helps readers take responsibility for getting the following four essential things from their bosses in order to succeed at their jobs: 

  • Clearly spelled out and reasonable expectations (that is, clear goals with specific guidelines and a concrete timetable to accomplish them).
  • The skills, tools, and resources necessary to accomplish those expectations, or else the acknowledgement that you are being asked to achieve those expectations without the skills, tools, or resources that you need.
  • Accurate and honest feedback about your performance as well as course-correcting direction when necessary.
  • A fair quid pro quo—recognition and rewards—in exchange for your performance. 

Bruce Tulgan is an adviser to business leaders all over the world and a sought-after speaker and seminar leader. He is the founder of the management training firm RainmakerThinking, Inc., where he works with top companies on improving their management practices. Bruce is the author of the bestselling It's Okay to be the Boss, the classic Managing Generation X, as well as Not Everybody Gets a Trophy, Winning the Talent Wars and eleven Manager's Pocket Guides.

In this essential book, Tulgan reassures employees that it’s ok to manage their bosses. They just have to be really good at it. This book will help them do just that.

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It s Okay to Manage Your Boss: The Step-by-Step Program for Making the Best of Your Most Important Relationship at Work (US $23.95)

-and- The Power in a Link: Open Doors, Close Deals, and Change the Way You Do Business Using LinkedIn (US $19.95)

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