Wiley
Wiley.com
Print this page Share

Progress in Food Preservation

Rajeev Bhat (Editor), Abd Karim Alias (Editor), Gopinadham Paliyath (Editor)
ISBN: 978-0-470-65585-6
656 pages
March 2012, Wiley-Blackwell
Progress in Food Preservation (0470655852) cover image
This volume presents a wide range of new approaches aimed at improving the safety and quality of food products and agricultural commodities. Each chapter provides in-depth information on new and emerging food preservation techniques including those relating to decontamination, drying and dehydration, packaging innovations and the use of botanicals as natural preservatives for fresh animal and plant products.

The 28 chapters, contributed by an international team of experienced researchers, are presented in five sections, covering:

  • Novel decontamination techniques
  • Novel preservation techniques
  • Active and atmospheric packaging
  • Food packaging
  • Mathematical modelling of food preservation processes
  • Natural preservatives

This title will be of great interest to food scientists and engineers based in food manufacturing and in research establishments. It will also be useful to advanced students of food science and technology.

See More
Preface xix

Contributors xxi

Part I Active and Atmospheric Packaging 1

1 Selected Techniques to Decontaminate Minimally Processed Vegetables 3
Vicente M. Gomez-Lopez

1.1 Introduction 3

1.2 UV-C light 4

1.3 Pulsed light 6

1.4 Electrolysed oxidizing water 8

1.5 Ozone 11

1.6 Low-temperature blanching 15

2 Active and Intelligent Packaging of Food 23
Istvan Siro

2.1 Introduction 23

2.2 Active scavengers 25

2.3 Active releasers/emitters 29

2.4 Intelligent packaging 37

2.5 Nanotechnology in active and intelligent packaging 39

2.6 Future trends 41

2.7 Further sources of information 42

3 Modified-Atmosphere Storage of Foods 49
Osman Erkmen

3.1 Introduction 49

3.2 Modified atmosphere 50

3.3 Effects of modified gas atmospheres on microorganisms and foods 55

3.4 Application of modified atmospheres for food preservation 60

3.5 Food safety and future outlook 63

3.6 Conclusions 63

4 Effects of Combined Treatments with Modified-Atmosphere Packaging on Shelf-Life Improvement of Food Products 67
Shengmin Lu and Qile Xia

4.1 Introduction 67

4.2 Physical treatments 68

4.3 Chemical treatments 75

4.4 Quality-improving agents 82

4.5 Antibrowning agents 83

4.6 Natural products 84

4.7 Other methods, such as oxygen scavengers and coatings 89

4.8 Biocontrol 90

5 Coating Technology for Food Preservation 111
Chamorn Chawengkijwanich and Phikunthong Kopermsub

5.1 Introduction 111

5.2 Progress in relevant materials and their applications in coating 112

5.3 Progress in coating methodology 118

5.4 Future trends in coating technology 121

5.5 Conclusions 122

Part II Novel Decontamination Techniques 129

6 Biological Materials and Food-Drying Innovations 131
Habib Kocabiyik

6.1 Introduction 131

6.2 Microwave drying 133

6.3 Radio frequency drying 134

6.4 Infrared drying 136

6.5 Refractance windowTM drying 138

7 Atmospheric Freeze Drying 143
Shek Mohammod Atiqure Rahman and Arun S. Mujumdar

7.1 Introduction 143

7.2 Basic principles 144

7.3 Types of atmospheric freeze dryer and application 146

7.4 A novel approach to AFD 149

7.5 Model 156

7.6 Conclusions 158

8 Osmotic Dehydration: Theory, Methodologies, and Applications in Fish, Seafood, and Meat Products 161
Ioannis S. Arvanitoyannis, Agapi Veikou, and Panagiota Panagiotaki

8.1 Introduction 161

8.2 Methods of drying 165

8.3 Some results 168

8.4 Conclusions 186

9 Dehydration of Fruit and Vegetables in Tropical Regions 191
Salim-ur-Rehman and Javaid Aziz Awan

9.1 Introduction 191

9.2 Forms of water 192

9.3 Advantages of dried foods 192

9.4 Drying processes 193

9.5 Dehydration 196

9.6 Evaporation and concentration 200

9.7 Spoilage of dried fruits and vegetables 203

9.8 Merits of dehydration over sun drying 203

9.9 Effects of dehydration on nutritive value of fruits and vegetables 204

9.10 Effects of drying on microorganisms 204

9.11 Effect of drying on enzyme activity 205

9.12 Influence of drying on pigments 205

9.13 Reconstitution test 205

9.14 Drying parameters 208

10 Developments in the Thermal Processing of Food 211
Tareq M. Osaili

10.1 Introduction 211

10.2 Thermal processing 212

10.3 Innovative thermal processing techniques 215

11 Ozone in Food Preservation 231
Bulent Zorlugenc and Feyza Kiroglu Zorlugenc

11.1 Introduction 231

11.2 History 232

11.3 Chemistry 232

11.4 Generation 233

11.5 Antimicrobial effect 234

11.6 Applications 236

11.7 Toxicity and safety of personnel 241

11.8 Conclusion 241

12 Application of High Hydrostatic Pressure Technology for Processing and Preservation of Foods 247
Hudaa Neetoo and Haiqiang Chen

12.1 Introduction 247

12.2 The working principles of high hydrostatic pressure 248

12.3 Microbial inactivation by high hydrostatic pressure 249

12.4 Effect of high pressure on the physical and biochemical characteristics of food systems 251

12.5 Applications of high hydrostatic pressure to specific food commodities 253

12.6 Conclusions 268

13 Pulsed Electric Fields for Food Preservation: An Update on Technological Progress 277
Abdorreza Mohammadi Nafchi, Rajeev Bhat, and Abd Karim Alias

13.1 Introduction 277

13.2 Historical background of pulsed electric fields 278

13.3 Pulsed electric field processing 278

13.4 Mechanisms and factors affecting pulsed electric fields 279

13.5 Pulsed electric field applications in food processing 280

13.6 Nanosecond pulsed electric fields 281

13.7 Impacts of pulsed electric fields on antioxidant features 282

13.8 Effects of pulsed electric fields on solid textures 286

13.9 Starch modification by pulsed electric fields 286

13.10 Conclusions 289

14 Salting Technology in Fish Processing 297
Hulya Turan and Ibrahim Erkoyuncu

14.1 Introduction 297

14.2 Process steps in salting technology 298

14.3 Factors affecting the penetration of salt 304

14.4 Ripening of salted fish 307

14.5 Conclusion 312

15 Hypoxanthine Levels, Chemical Studies and Bacterial Flora of Alternate Frozen/Thawed Market-Simulated Marine Fish Species 315
Olusegun A. Oyelese

15.1 Introduction 315

15.2 Sources of contamination of fish 316

15.3 Fish as a perishable food 316

15.4 Indicators of deterioration in frozen fish 318

15.5 Bacterial food poisoning in seafood 318

15.6 Methods used for assessing deteriorative changes in fish 319

15.7 Study of three marine fish species 323

15.8 Conclusions 328

16 Preservation of Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz): A Major Crop to Nourish People Worldwide 331
G.J. Benoit Gnonlonfin, Ambaliou Sanni and Leon Brimer

16.1 Introduction: cassava production and importance 331

16.2 Nutritional value 331

16.3 Cassava utilization 332

16.4 Factors that limit cassava utilization, and its toxicity 333

16.5 Cassava processing 336

16.6 Storage of processed cassava products 339

17 Use of Electron Beams in Food Preservation 343
Rajeev Bhat, Abd Karim Alias and Gopinadhan Paliyath

17.1 Introduction 343

17.2 Food irradiation, source and technology 344

17.3 The food industry and electron-beam irradiation 346

17.4 Electron-beam irradiation and microorganisms 364

17.5 Conclusion and future outlook 365

Part III Modelling 373

18 Treatment of Foods using High Hydrostatic Pressure 375
Sencer Buzrul and Hami Alpas

18.1 Introduction 375

18.2 Pressure and the earth 376

18.3 Main factors characterizing high hydrostatic pressure 376

18.4 Historical perspective 377

18.5 High hydrostatic pressure process and equipment 378

18.6 Commercal high hydrostatic pressure-treated food products around the world 381

18.7 Consumer acceptance of high hydrostatic pressure processing 382

19 Role of Predictive Microbiology in Food Preservation 389
Francisco Noe Arroyo-Lopez, Joaquin Bautista-Gallego and Antonio Garrido-Fernandez

19.1 Microorganisms in foods 389

19.2 Predictive microbiology 391

19.3 Software packages and web applications in predictive microbiology 400

19.4 Applications of predictive microbiology in food preservation 402

20 Factors Affecting the Growth of Microorganisms in Food 405
Siddig Hussein Hamad

20.1 Introduction 405

20.2 Intrinsic factors 406

20.3 Extrinsic factors 417

20.4 Implicit factors 423

20.5 Processing factors 424

20.6 Interaction between factors 425

21 A Whole-Chain Approach to Food Safety Management and Quality Assurance of Fresh Produce 429
Hans Rediers, Inge Hanssen, Matthew S. Krause, Ado Van Assche, Raf De Vis, Rita Moloney and Kris A. Willems

21.1 Introduction: the management of food safety requires a holistic approach 429

21.2 Microbial quality management starts in production 431

21.3 Processing of fresh produce is a key step in quality preservation 433

21.4 Monitoring the entire food supply chain 437

21.5 The improvement of compliance by increasing awareness 442

21.6 Last but not least: consumers 443

21.7 Conclusion 444

Part IV Use of Natural Preservatives 451

22 Food Bioprotection: Lactic Acid Bacteria as Natural Preservatives 453
Graciela Vignolo, Lucila Saavedra, Fernando Sesma, and Raul Raya

22.1 Introduction 453

22.2 Antimicrobial potential of LAB 455

22.3 Bacteriocins 456

22.4 Food applications 458

22.5 Hurdle technology to enhance food safety 468

22.6 Bacteriocins in packaging films 471

22.7 Conclusions 473

23 Bacteriocins: Recent Advances and Opportunities 485
Taoufik Ghrairi, Nawel Chaftar and Khaled Hani

23.1 Introduction 485

23.2 Bacteriocins produced by LAB 486

23.3 Bioprotection against pathogenic bacteria 493

23.4 Bioprotection against spoilage microorganisms 500

23.5 Medical and veterinary potential of LAB bacteriocins 501

23.6 Conclusion 501

24 Application of Botanicals as Natural Preservatives in Food 513
Vibha Gupta and Jagdish Nair

24.1 Introduction 513

24.2 Antibacterials 514

24.3 Antifungals 517

24.4 Antioxidants 518

24.5 Applications 520

24.6 Conclusion 523

25 Tropical Medicinal Plants in Food Processing and Preservation: Potentials and Challenges 531
Afolabi F. Eleyinmi

25.1 Introduction 531

25.2 Some tropical medicinal plants with potential food-processing value 532

25.3 Conclusion 535

26 Essential Oils and Other Plant Extracts as Food Preservatives 539
Thierry Regnier, Sandra Combrinck and Wilma Du Plooy

26.1 Background 539

26.2 Secondary metabolites of plants 542

26.3 Modes of action of essential oils and plant extracts 544

26.4 Specific applications of plant extracts in the food industry 545

26.5 Medicinal plants and the regulations governing the use of botanical biocides 564

26.6 Future perspectives 568

26.7 Conclusions 569

27 Plant-Based Products as Control Agents of Stored-Product Insect Pests in the Tropics 581
Joshua O. Ogendo, Arop L. Deng, Rhoda J. Birech and Philip K. Bett

27.1 Introduction 581

27.2 Common insect pests of stored food grains in the tropics 583

27.3 Advances in stored-product insect pest control in the tropics 590

27.4 Advances in development of botanical pesticides in the tropics 592

27.5 Prospects of botanical pesticides 597

28 Preservation of Plant and Animal Foods: An Overview 603
Gabriel O. Adegoke and Abiodun A. Olapade

28.1 Introduction: definition and principles 603

28.2 Food preservation methods 603

28.3 Conclusion 609

References 609

Index 613

See More
Rajeev Bhat is a Senior Lecturer in the Food Technology Division at the University Sains Malaysia, specialising in food safety and nutrition. His research interests include: food nanotechnology, nutraceuticals, microbial technology and the application of modern food preservation technology. Presently, he is involved in teaching food microbiology and food chemistry. Dr Bhat has published more than 50 papers in peer reviewed international and national journals. He has several book chapters to his credit and has co-edited a book on food biotechnology.

A.K. Alias joined the School of Industrial Technology at the University Sains Malaysia in 1994 after obtaining his PhD in Food Technology from University of Reading. He teaches food processing and preservation, physical properties of foods and food ingredients. His research interests are mainly in the fundamental aspects of structure-property relationships and the technological applications of starch and non-starch polysaccharides. He is the group leader of the Food Biopolymer Research Group, a virtual research group established to undertake extensive research on food biopolymers. He has published more than 60 papers in international journals and proceedings and presented more than 40 conference papers.

Gopinadhan Paliyath is a Professor at the University of Guelph, Canada. His research is primarily in the area of biochemistry, specifically pertaining to fruits and vegetables, and in relation to their senescence (ethylene, signal transduction, calcium second messenger system), shelf life and quality, nutraceutical ingredients and their mechanism of action. Recent research includes investigations on the role of phospholipase D (PLD) in membrane homeostasis and signal transduction.

See More
Back to Top