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Race: Are We So Different?

ISBN: 978-0-470-65714-0
276 pages
November 2012, Wiley-Blackwell
Race: Are We So Different? (0470657146) cover image
Perspectives on race today

Featuring new and engaging essays by noted anthropologists and illustrated with full color photos, RACE: Are We So Different? is an accessible and fascinating look at the idea of race, demonstrating how current scientific understanding is often inconsistent with popular notions of race. Taken from the popular national public education project and museum exhibition, it explores the contemporary experience of race and racism in the United States and the often-invisible ways race and racism have influenced laws, customs, and social institutions.

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List of Illustrations vii

Preface xi

Acknowledgments xiii

1 Regarding Race 1

Part 1 Histories of Race, Difference, and Racism 7

2 Introducing Race 9

3 Creating Race 15

4 Human Mismeasure 26

5 Inventing Whiteness 44

6 Separate and Unequal 67

Part 2 Why Human Variation Is Not Racial 91

7 Introduction: Race ≠ Human Biological Variation 93

8 Skin Deep? 101

9 Sickle Cell Disease: Not for Blacks Only 111

10 The Apportionment of Variation, or … Why We Are All Africans Under the Skin 123

11 The Evolution of Variation 133

Part 3 Living with Race and Racism 145

12 Introduction: Living with Race and Racism 147

13 Race and the Census 154

14 Race and Education 174

15 Linking Race and Wealth: An American Dilemma 195

16 Race and Health Disparities 214

17 Conclusion 231

Glossary 246

Index 253

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Alan H. Goodman is Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty at Hampshire College. A biological anthropologist who has written extensively on human variation and the biological consequences of inequality and poverty, he co-leads the national public education project sponsored by the AAA and funded by NSF and the Ford Foundation. Goodman is a past President of the AAA. 

Yolanda T. Moses is Professor of Anthropology, Associate Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Excellence and Equity at the University of California, Riverside. A cultural anthropologist, she has published extensively on issues of social inequality in complex societies and cultural diversity in higher education in the United States, India, and South Africa. She chaired the National Advisory Committee composed of distinguished scholars and curators that designed the original exhibit and website.She co-leads the national public education project sponsored by the AAA and funded by NSF and the Ford Foundation. Moses is past President of the AAA.

Joseph L. Jones is former RACE project manager for the American Anthropological Association. He also has written extensively on race and the stresses of enslavement. He is finishing his dissertation from University of Massachusetts Amherst on “The Political Ecology of Early Childhood Lead Exposure for Enslaved Africans from the New York African Burial Ground.”

Sponsored by the American Anthropological Association (AAA). Founded in 1902, the American Anthropological Association (AAA) is the world’s largest professional organization of scholars and practitioners in the field of anthropology. With over 11 thousand members, the Arlington, Virginia-based association includes archaeologists, cultural anthropologists, biological anthropologists, linguists, and applied anthropologists from around the world. AAA publishes 22 peer-reviewed scholarly journals and conducts the largest annual meeting of anthropologists in the world. 
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October 30, 2012
Is Race Real? What Do We Really Know About Race?

Is race real?  What do we really know about race?

Race is a short word with a long history in the United States of America. RACE: Are We So Different? explores the central idea of race and how this notion has been challenged and changed throughout history.

Illustrated in full color with images from the popular US national public education project and museum exhibition of the American Anthropological Association, RACE: Are We So Different? offers a primer on the complex science of human variation and the history and lived experiences of race and racism. 

"This book brings together compelling evidence from many disciplines to show that ... the biology of race is a powerful myth. It is important, absorbing, educational, and   masterful in its telling." - Daryl G. Smith

New and engaging essays by prominent social scientists and scientists provide examples from their personal experiences and individual research projects, revealing the different ways that the idea and realities of race and racism are experienced.

More information on the exhibition, the award-winning website materials and further teaching resources may be found at www.understandingrace.org. 

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