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An Introduction to Advanced Quantum Physics

ISBN: 978-0-470-68675-1
224 pages
May 2010
An Introduction to Advanced Quantum Physics (0470686758) cover image
An Introduction to Advanced Quantum Physics presents important concepts from classical mechanics, electricity and magnetism, statistical physics, and quantum physics brought together to discuss the interaction of radiation and matter, selection rules, symmetries and conservation laws, scattering, relativistic quantum mechanics, apparent paradoxes, elementary quantum field theory, electromagnetic and weak interactions, and much more.

This book consists of two parts:

Part 1 comprises the material suitable for a second course in quantum physics and covers:

  • Electromagnetic Radiation and Matter
  • Scattering
  • Symmetries and Conservation Laws
  • Relativistic Quantum Physics
  • Special Topics

Part 2 presents elementary quantum field theory and discusses:

  • Second Quantization of Spin 1/2 and Spin 1 Fields
  • Covariant Perturbation Theory and Applications
  • Quantum Electrodynamics

Each chapter concludes with problems to challenge the students’ understanding of the material.

This text is intended for graduate and ambitious undergraduate students in physics, material sciences, and related disciplines.

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Preface.

PART 1 Relativistic Quantum Physics.

1 Electromagnetic Radiation and Matter.

1.1 Hamiltonian and Vector Potential.

1.2 Second Quantization.

1.3 Time-Dependent Perturbation Theory.

1.4 Spontaneous Emission.

1.5 Blackbody Radiation.

1.6 Selection Rules.

2 Scattering.

2.1 Scattering Amplitude and Cross Section.

2.2 Born Approximation.

2.3 Photo-Electric Effect.

2.4 Photon Scattering.

3 Symmetries and Conservation Laws.

3.1 Symmetries and Conservation Laws.

3.2 Continuous Symmetry Operators.

3.3 Discrete Symmetry Operators.

3.4 Degeneracy.

4 Relativistic Quantum Physics.

4.1 Klein-Gordon Equation.

4.2 Dirac Equation.

4.3 Solutions of the Dirac Equation, Anti-Particles.

4.4 Spin, Non-Relativistic Limit and Magnetic Moment.

4.5 The Hydrogen Atom Re-Revisited.

5 Special Topics.

5.1 Introduction.

5.2 Measurements in Quantum Physics.

5.3 Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox.

5.4 Schrödinger’s Cat.

5.5 The Watched Pot.

5.6 Hidden Variables and Bell’s Theorem.

PART 2 Introduction to Quantum Field Theory.

6 Second Quantization of Spin 1/2 and Spin 1 Fields.

6.1 Second Quantization of Spin 1/2   Fields.

6.2 Second Quantization of Spin 1 Fields.

7 Covariant Perturbation Theory and Applications.

7.1 Covariant Perturbation Theory.

7.2 W and Z Boson Decays.

7.3 Feynman Graphs.

7.4 Second Order Processes and Propagators.

8 Quantum Electrodynamics.

8.1 Electron-Positron Annihilation.

8.2 Electron-Muon Scattering.

Index.

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  • The book limits itself to those topics that are absolutely necessary for understanding elementary particle physics and condensed matter.
  • Intended for undergraduates who take a third and fourth quarter of quantum physics and to train undergraduates in more advanced techniques that will be necessary for applications of quantum mechanics
  • Important concepts from classical mechanics, electricity and magnetism, statistical physics, and quantum physics are pulled together to discuss the interaction of radiation and matter, selection rules, symmetries and conservation laws, scattering, relativistic quantum mechanics, and more.
  • The strength is the presentation of all the topics of the book with a common convention for notation
  • Includes problems within the text and solutions on the author’s website.
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"The material is intended for undergraduates who are planning to take up the study of elementary particle physics or condensed matter. The problem section given at the end of each chapter is a useful addition for a better understanding of the subject." (Zentralblatt MATH, 2011)

 

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