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The Blackwell Companion to Law and Society

Austin Sarat (Editor)
ISBN: 978-0-470-69291-2
688 pages
April 2008, Wiley-Blackwell
The Blackwell Companion to Law and Society (047069291X) cover image
The Blackwell Companion to Law and Society is an authoritative study of the relationship between law and social interaction. Thirty-two original essays by an international group of expert scholars examine a wide range of critical questions. Authors represent various theoretical, methodological, and political commitments, creating the first truly global overview of the field.

  • Examines the relationship between law and social interactions in thirty-three original essay by international experts in the field.
  • Reflects the world-wide significance of North American law and society scholarship.
  • Addresses classical areas and new themes in law and society research, including: the gap between law on the books and law in action; the complexity of institutional processes; the significance of new media; and the intersections of law and identity.
  • Engages the exciting work now being done in England, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand, South Africa, Israel, as well as "Third World" scholarship.
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Preface.

List of Contributors.

1. Vitality Amidst Fragmentation: On the Emergence of Post-Realist Law and Society Scholarship:.

Austin Sarat (Amherst College).

Part I: Perspectives on the History and Significance of Law and Society Research:.

2. Law in Social Theory, And Social Theory in the Study of Law: Roger Cotterrell (University of London).

3. Profession, Science, and Culture: An Emergent Canon of Law and Society Research: Carroll Seron (Baruch College of the City University of New York) and Susan S. Silbey (M.I.T).

Part II: The Cultural Life of Law:.

4. The Work of Rights and the Work Rights Do: A Critical Empirical Approach: Laura Beth Nielsen (American Bar Foundation).

5. Consciousness and Ideology: Patricia Ewick (Clark University).

6. Law in Popular Culture: Richard Sherwin (New York Law School).

7. Comparing Legal Cultures: David Nelken (University of Macerata).

Part III. Institutions and Actors:.

8. The Police and Policing: Jeannine Bell (Indiana University).

9. Professional Power: Lawyers and the Constitution of Professional Authority: Tanina Rostain (New York Law School).

10. Courts and Judges: Lee Epstein (Washington University) and Jack Knight (Washington University).

11. Jurors and Juries: Valerie P. Hans (University of Delaware) and Neil Vidmar (Duke University).

12. Regulators and Regulatory Processes: Robert Kagan (University of California, Berkeley).

13. The Legal Lives of Private Organizations: Lauren B. Edelman (University of California-Berkeley).

Part IV. Domains of Policy:.

14. Legal Regulation of Families in Changing Societies: Susan Boyd (University of British Columbia).

15. Culture, “Kulturkampf” and Beyond: The Antidiscrimination Principle Under the Jurisprudence of Backlash: Francisco Valdes (University of Miami).

16. The Government of Risk: Pat O’Malley (Carleton University).

17. Thinking About Criminal Justice: Socio-Legal Expertise and the Modernization of American Criminal Justice: Jonathan Simon (University of California, Berkeley).

18. Rights in the Shadow of Class: Poverty, Welfare, and the Law: Frank Munger (New York Law School).

19. Immigration: Susan Sterett (University of Denver).

20. Commodity Culture, Private Censorship, Branded Environments, and Global Trade Politics: Intellectual Property as a Topic of Law and Society Research: Rosemary J. Coombe (York University).

21. Legal Categorizations and Religion: On Politics of Modernity, Practices, Faith, and Power: Gad Barzilai (Tel-Aviv University).

22. The Role of Social Science in Legal Decisions: Jonathan Yovel (University of Haifa) and Elizabeth Mertz (University of Wisconsin).

Part V. How Does Law Matter?.

23. Procedural Justice: Tom Tyler (New York University).

24. A Tale of Two Genres: On the Real and Ideal Links Between Law & Society and Critical Race Theory: Laura Gomez (UCLA).

25. The Constitution of Identity: Gender, Feminist Legal Theory and the Law and Society Movement: Nicola Lacey (Australian National University).

26. Sexuality, Law and Society: Leslie J. Moran (Birkbeck College, University of London).

27. Law and Social Movements: Michael McCann (University of Washington).

28. “The Dog That Didn’t Bark:” A Soci0-Legal Tale of Law, Democracy and Elections: Stuart Scheingold (University of Washington).

Part VI. Studying Globalization: Past, Present, Future:.

29. Ethnographies of Law: Eve Darian-Smith (University of California, Santa Barbara).

30. Colonial and Post-Colonial Law: Sally Merry (Wellesley College).

31. Human Rights: Lisa Hajjar (University of California-Santa Barbara).

32. The Rule of Law and Economic Development in a Global Era: Kathryn Hendley (University of Wisconsin).

33. Economic Globalization and the Law in the 21st Century: Francis Snyder (Université d'Aix-Marseille III, Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches Internationales et Communautaires).

Index

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Austin Sarat is William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science at Amherst College. He was President of the Law and Society Association in 1998-1999, and is currently president of the Association for the Study of Law, Culture, and the Humanities. He is the author or editor of over 50 books, including Cultural Pluralism. Identity Politics and the Law (edited with Thomas Kearns, 1999), Cause Lawyering and the State in a Global Era (edited with Stuart Scheingold, 2001), Pain, Death, and the Law (2001), When the State Kills: Capital Punishment and the American Condition (2001), and Human Rights: Concepts, Contests, Contingencies (edited with Thomas R. Kearns, 2001).
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  • Examines the relationship between law and social interactions in 33 original essays by international experts in the field.
  • Reflects the world-wide significance of North American law and society scholarship.
  • Addresses classical areas and new themes in law and society research, including: the gap between law on the books and law in action; the complexity of institutional processes; the significance of new media; and the intersections of law and identity.
  • Engages the exciting work now being done in England, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand, South Africa, Israel, as well as "Third World" scholarship.
See More
"This collection of law and society scholarship fills a gap that many of us in the field have lamented for years. Encyclopedic in scope, it manages to represent the rich diversity of the field while still making a strong case for a law and society "canon". It is bound to become a classic."

Kitty Calavita, University of California, Irvine

"Austin Sarat and his contributors have compiles a valuable and authoritative introduction to a substantial body of scholarship and reflection on the relationship between law and society. this will be an essential resource for both novice and experienced workers in this field."

Robert Dingwall, University of Nottingham

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