Thank you for visiting us. We are currently updating our shopping cart and regret to advise that it will be unavailable until September 1, 2014. We apologise for any inconvenience and look forward to serving you again.

Wiley
Wiley.com
Print this page Share
E-book

A Companion to the Worlds of the Renaissance

Guido Ruggiero (Editor)
ISBN: 978-0-470-75161-9
576 pages
April 2008, Wiley-Blackwell
A Companion to the Worlds of the Renaissance (0470751614) cover image
This volume brings together some of the most exciting renaissance scholars to suggest new ways of thinking about the period and to set a new series of agendas for Renaissance scholarship.

  • Overturns the idea that it was a period of European cultural triumph and highlights the negative as well as the positive.
  • Looks at the Renaissance from a world, as opposed to just European, perspective.
  • Views the Renaissance from perspectives other than just the cultural elite.
  • Gender, sex, violence, and cultural history are integrated into the analysis.
See More
Introduction: Renaissance Dreaming: In Search of a Paradigm: Guido Ruggiero (University of Miami).

Part I: The Course of Renaissance Events:.

1. The Italian Renaissance: Gene Brucker (University of California, Berkeley, retired).

2.The European Renaissance: Randolph Starn (University of California, Berkeley).

3. The Renaissance and the Middle East: Linda T. Darling (University of Arizona).

4. The Renaissance World from the West: Matthew Restall (Pennsylvania State University).

5. The Historical Geography of the Renaissance: Peter Burke (University of Cambridge).

Part II: The Worlds and Ways of Power:.

6. Governments and Bureaucracies: Edward Muir (Northwestern University).

7. Honor, Law, and Custom in Renaissance Europe: James R. Farr (Purdue University).

8. Violence and its Control in the Late Renaissance: An Italian Model: Gregory Hanlon (Dalhousie University).

9. Manners, Courts, and Civility: Robert Muchembled (University of Paris-North).

10. Family and Clan in the Renaissance World: Joanne M. Ferraro (San Diego State University).

11. Gender: Elissa B. Weaver (University of Chicago).

12. The Myth of Renaissance Individualism: John Jeffries Martin (Trinity University).

Part III: Social and Economic Worlds:.

13. Social Hierarchies: The Upper Classes: Matthew Vester (University of West Virginia).

14. Social Hierarchies: The Lower Classes: James S. Amelang (Universidad Autonomo de Madrid).

15. Tools for the Development of the European Economy: Karl Appuhn (New York University).

16. Economic Encounters and the First Stages of a World Economy: John A. Marino (University of California, San Diego).

Part IV: Cultural Worlds:.

17. The Subcultures of the Renaissance World: David C. Gentilcore (University of Leicester).

18. High Culture: Ingrid D. Rowland (American Academy in Rome).

19. Religious Cultures: R. Po-chia Hsia (Pennsylvania State University).

20. Art: Loren Partridge (University of California, Berkeley).

21. Literature: James Grantham Turner (University of California, Berkeley).

22. Political Ideas: John M. Najemy (Cornell University).

23. The Scientific Renaissance: William Eamon (New Mexico State University).

Part V: Anti-Worlds:.

24. Plague, Disease, and Hunger: Mary Lindemann (University of Miami).

25. Renaissance Bogeymen: The Necessary Monsters of the Age: Linda Woodbridge (Pennsylvania State University).

26. Violence and Warfare in the Renaissance World: Thomas F. Arnold (Yale University).

27. Witchcraft and Magic: Guido Ruggiero (University of Miami).

28. The Illicit Worlds of the Renaissance: Ian Frederick Moulton (Arizona State University).

Consolidated Bibliography.

Index.

See More
Guido Ruggiero is Professor and Chair of the History Department at the University of Miami. His previous publications include Binding Passions: Tales of Magic Marriage and Power at the End of the Renaissance (1993), The Boundaries of Eros: Sex Crime and Sexuality in Renaissance Venice (1985), and Violence in Early Renaissance Venice (1980). He has also edited two series of books: Studies in the History of Sexuality and Selections from Quaderni Storici.
See More

  • A collection from some of the most original Renaissance scholars, suggesting new ways of thinking about the period.

  • Overturns the idea that it was a period of European cultural triumph and highlights the negative as well as the positive.

  • Looks at the Renaissance from a world, as opposed to just European, perspective.

  • Views the Renaissance from perspectives other than just the cultural elite.

  • Gender, sex, violence, and cultural history are integrated into the analysis.
See More
"This volume would be a useful tool in an academic library providing students of the period with a valuable source of both traditional and new thought on the Renaissance world. The essays are involved and need to be considered in some detail to fully appreciate the scholarly thought. Perhaps most useful as a stepping-stone to further study, it is an excellent volume that deserves shelf space in all non-specialist academic libraries and libraries that serve history lovers." Louise Ellis-Barrett, Assistant Librarian, Dulwich College, London <!--end-->

"This companion sets new agendas for research and explores some refreshing ways of thinking about the Renaissance. Contributors include scholars from many disciplines. Recommended for scholars, researchers, upper-division under-graduates and graduates students" Choice

"This most impressive volume deserves considerable praise. The editor, in his helpful and wide-ranging introduction, ensures a fascinating and valuable volume." Journal of European Studies

"This Companion (with notes, and a rich composite bibliography) is strongest on social history and literature, as well as for historical insights and literary merits" History Today

"The articles are not simply factual summaries: they all have their own arguments, and many of them suggest places where the present state of knowledge is inadequate, so that the book is rich in suggestions for further research.... Ruggiero asks his readers to "applaud if you have enjoyed our performance"; yes, it is greatly enjoyable." John Considine, University of Alberta

See More

Related Titles

Back to Top