Wiley
Wiley.com
Print this page Share
E-book

The Handbook of Speech Perception

David Pisoni (Editor), Robert Remez (Editor)
ISBN: 978-0-470-75677-5
704 pages
April 2008, Wiley-Blackwell
The Handbook of Speech Perception (0470756772) cover image
The Handbook of Speech Perception is a collection of forward-looking articles that offer a summary of the technical and theoretical accomplishments in this vital area of research on language.

* Now available in paperback, this uniquely comprehensive companion brings together in one volume the latest research conducted in speech perception

* Contains original contributions by leading researchers in the field

* Illustrates technical and theoretical accomplishments and challenges across the field of research and language

* Adds to a growing understanding of the far-reaching relevance of speech perception in the fields of phonetics, audiology and speech science, cognitive science, experimental psychology, behavioral neuroscience, computer science, and electrical engineering, among others.
See More
List of Contributors.

Preface: Michael Studdert-Kennedy (Haskins Laboratories).

Introduction: David B. Pisoni (Indiana University) and Robert E. Remez (Barnard College).

Part I: Sensing Speech.

1. Acoustic Analysis and Synthesis of Speech: James R. Sawusch (University at Buffalo).

2. Perceptual Organization of Speech: Robert E. Remez (Barnard College).

3. Primacy of Multimodal Speech Perception: Lawrence D. Rosenblum (University of California, Riverside).

4. Phonetic Processing by the Speech Perceiving Brain: Lynne E. Bernstein (House Ear Institute).

5. Event-related Evoked Potentials (ERPs) in Speech Perception: Dennis Molfese, Alexandra P. Fonaryova Key, Mandy J. Maguire, Guy O. Dove and Victoria J. Molfese (all University of Louisville).

Part II: Perception of Linguistic Properties.

6. Features in Speech Perception and Lexical Access: Kenneth N. Stevens (Massachusetts Institute of Technology).

7. Speech Perception and Phonological Contrast: Edward Flemming (Stanford University).

8. Acoustic Cues to the Perception of Segmental Phonemes: Lawrence J. Raphael (Adelphi University).

9. Clear Speech: Rosalie M. Uchanski (CID at Washington University School of Medicine).

10. Perception of Intonation: Jacqueline Vaissiere (Laboratoire de Phonetique et de Phonologique, Paris).

11. Lexical Stress: Anne C. Cutler (Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands).

12. Slips of the Ear: Z. S. Bond (Ohio University).

Part III: Perception of Indexical Properties.

13. Perception of Dialect Variation: Cynthia Clopper and David B. Pisoni (both Indiana University).

14. Perception of Voice Quality: Jody Kreiman (UCLA), Diana Vanlancker-Sidtis (New York University) and Bruce R. Gerratt (UCLA).

15. Speaker Normalization in Speech Perception: Keith A. Johnson (Ohio State University).

16. Perceptual Integration of Linguistic and Non-Linguistic Properties of Speech: Lynne C. Nygaard (Emory University).

Part IV: Speech Perception by Special Listeners.

17. Speech Perception in Infants: Derek M. Houston (Indiana University School of Medicine).

18. Speech Perception in Childhood: Amanda C. Walley (University of Alabama, Birmingham).

19. Age-related Changes in Spoken Word Recognition: Mitchell S. Sommers (Washington University).

20. Speech Perception in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants: David B. Pisoni (Indiana University).

21. Speech Perception following Focal Brain Injury: William Badacker (Johns Hopkins University).

22. Cross-Language Speech Perception: Nuria Sebastian-Galles (Parc Cientific de Barcelona – Hospital de San Joan de Déu).

23. Speech Perception in Specific Language Impairment: Susan Ellis Weismer (University of Wisconsin, Madison).

Part V: Recognition of Spoken Words.

24. Spoken Word Recognition: The Challenge of Variation: Paul A. Luce and Conor T. McLennan (State University of New York, Buffalo).

25. Probabilistic Phonotactics in Spoken Word Recognition: Edward T. Auer, Jr. (House Ear Institute) and Paul A. Luce (State University of New York, Buffalo).

Part VI: Theoretical Perspectives.

26. The Relation of Speech Perception and Speech Production: Carol A. Fowler and Bruno Galantucci (both Haskins Laboratories).

27. A Neuroethological Perspective on the Perception of Vocal Communication Signals: Timothy Gentner (University of Chicago) and Gregory F. Ball (Johns Hopkins University).

Index

See More
David B. Pisoni is Chancellor’s Professor of Psychology and Cognitive Science and Adjunct Professor of Linguistics at Indiana University in Bloomington. He is also an Adjunct Professor of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery at the Indiana University School of Medicine. He has published numerous articles on topics such as speech synthesis, speech perception and spoken word recognition, and acoustic phonetics in a wide variety of scientific journals including Science, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Ear and Hearing, and Speech Communication.

Robert E. Remez is Ann Whitney Olin Professor of Psychology at Barnard College, Columbia University. His research on the perception and production of speech has focused on perceptual organization and the identification of individual talkers. His research reports have appeared in a variety of scientific journals including Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, Perception & Psychophysics, Psychological Review, Psychological Science, and Science.

See More

  • Now available in paperback, this uniquely comprehensive companion brings together in one volume the latest research conducted in speech perception
  • Contains original contributions by leading researchers in the field
  • Illustrates technical and theoretical accomplishments and challenges across the field of research and language
  • Adds to a growing understanding of the far-reaching relevance of speech perception in the fields of phonetics, audiology and speech science, cognitive science, experimental psychology, behavioral neuroscience, computer science, and electrical engineering, among others.
See More
"A detailed collection of forward-thinking seminal articles...enables both the student and researcher to understand the most complicated aspects of the subject... If you have to purchase just one core text on speech perception- definitely buy this! ... an exciting, stimulating and informative collection of readings available as a single volume that is excellent value for money. The editors have assembled a wonderful resource." (Reference Reviews)

"The Handbook includes a rich and comprehensive set of papers providing a state-of-the-art view of current research on speech perception. David Pisoni and Robert Remez have done a remarkable job in pulling together this broad and important range of topics contributed by many of the leading researchers in the field. The chapters are well-written, interesting, and provocative. Taken together, The Handbook of Speech Perception provides an exciting, stimulating, and informative set of readings that is a must-read for anyone interested in learning about this important field of research."
Sheila E. Blumstein, Brown University

"This is a most welcome book. For the expert who is well aware of the complexity of the issues and methods in speech perception, this handbook is a godsend for its thoroughness. It covers the field from a to z including, most notably, extended examination of the challenges that speech variability presents to the listener and that special listeners face. For the student or researcher from outside the field, the handbook is a lively introduction to the extraordinary progress that the study of speech perception has enjoyed over the last few decades."
Gary Dell, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

"This real treasury marks the maturity of the field of speech perception, making the whole body of work widely available in one volume as never before. The core of experimental studies in young adults that defined the field 30 years ago was based in phonology, acoustic phonetics, perception psychology, and physiology. The editors are to be congratulated on updating these roots, while reflecting the kaleidoscopic extension into studies with infants, the elderly, and distinct patient groups, and consolidating the link to neuroscience."
Mark Haggard, MRC, Cambridge, UK

"This is a necessary volume. At a time when advances in our understanding of speech perception are as likely to come from functional imaging techniques, Optimality Theory, or the study of speech perception mediated by cochlear implants, researchers need a single volume that captures the state of inquiry across the spectrum of speech research. Pisoni and Remez have assembled a wonderful resource."
David W. Gow, Jr., The Massachusetts General Hospital

"With the addition of this volume to the Blackwell series of handbooks in linguistics, the study of speech perception takes its rightful place as an independent and mature subdiscipline of linguistics. Covering a wide range of topics, from the encoding and neural representation of speech to the recognition of linguistic and paralinguistic properties by a variety of listener populations, this volume both surveys the current landscape of speech perception research and sets an agenda for the future development of the field."
Ann Bradlow, Northwestern University

See More
Back to Top