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Shakespeare's Tragedies: A Guide to Criticism

Emma Smith (Editor)
ISBN: 978-0-470-77689-6
384 pages
April 2008, Wiley-Blackwell
Shakespeare
This Guide steers students through the critical writing on Shakespeare’s tragedies from the sixteenth century to the present day.

  • Guides students through four centuries of critical writing on Shakespeare’s tragedies.
  • Covers both significant early views and recent critical interventions.
  • Substantial editorial material links the articles and places them in context.
  • Annotated suggestions for further reading allow students to investigate further.
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Introduction.

Part I: Criticism 1592-1904:.

Part II: Twentieth-Century Criticism:.

1. Genre.

Overview.

2. Dollimore, King Lear and Essential Humanism.

Cavell, Coriolanus and Interpretations of Politics.

Character.

Overview.

3. Holland, The Resources of Characterisation in Othello.

Leverena, The Woman in Hamlet: An Interpersonal View.

Language.

Overview.

4. Kermode, Anthony and Cleopatra.

Evans, Imperfect Speakers.

Gender and Sexuality.

Overview.

5. Kahn, The Daughter’s Seduction in Titus Andronicus.

Newman, Femininity and the Monstrous in Othello.

History and Politics.

Overview.

6. Kastan, Macbeth and the Name of King.

Wilson, Is this a holiday? Shakespeare’s Roman Carnival.

Texts.

Overview.

7. Warren, Quarto and Folio King Lear.

Marcus, Bad Taste and Bad Hamlet.

Performance.

Overview.

8. Cox, Titus Andronicus.

Loehlin, Baz Luhrmann’s Millenial Shakespeare.

Bibliography.

Index.

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Emma Smith is Fellow of Hertford College and Lecturer in English at Oxford University. Her publications include Thomas Kyd: The Spanish Tragedie (1998) and Shakespeare in Production: Henry V (2000), as well as two other edited volumes in the Blackwell Guides to Criticism series: Shakespeare’s Histories (2004) and Shakespeare’s Comedies (2004).
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  • Guides students through four centuries of critical writing on Shakespeare’s tragedies.

  • Covers both significant early views and recent critical interventions.

  • Substantial editorial material links the articles and places them in context.

  • Annotated suggestions for further reading allow students to investigate further.
See More

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