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Liquidity Risk Measurement and Management: A Practitioner's Guide to Global Best Practices

Leonard Matz (Editor), Peter Neu (Editor)
ISBN: 978-0-470-82182-4
350 pages
November 2006
Liquidity Risk Measurement and Management: A Practitioner
Major events such as the Asian crisis in 1997, the Russian default on short-term debt in 1998, the downfall of the hedge fund long-term capital management in 1998 and the disruption in payment systems following the World Trade Center attack in 2001, all resulted in increased management’s attention to liquidity risk.

Banks have realized that adequate systems and processes for identifying, measuring, monitoring and controlling liquidity risks help them to maintain a strong liquidity position, which in turn will increase the confidence of investors and rating agencies as well as improve funding costs and availability.

Liquidity Risk Measurement and Management: A Practitioner’s Guide to Global Best Practices provides the best practices in tools and techniques for bank liquidity risk measurement and management. Experienced bankers and highly regarded liquidity risk experts share their insights and practical experiences in this book.

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Acknowledgments.

About the Contributors.

1. Introduction (Peter Neu and Leonard Matz).

PART 1. MEASURING AND MONITORING LIQUIDITY RISK.

2. Liquidity Risk Measurement (Peter Neu).

3. Scenario Analysis and Stress Testing (Leonard Matz).

PART 2. MANAGING LIQUIDITY RISK.

4. Monitoring and Controlling Liquidity Risk (Leonard Matz).

5. Liquidity Risk Management Strategies and Tactics (Leonard Matz and Peter Neu).

6. Contingency Planning (Leonard Matz).

7. Market Developments in Banks’ Funding Markets (Peter Neu, Armin Leistenschneider, Bernhard Wondrak and Martin Knippschild).

PART 3. CASE STUDIES AND ALTERNATIVE VIEWS.

8. A Concept for Cash Flow and Funding Liquidity Risk (Robert Fiedler).

9. The Liquidity Impact of Derivatives Collateral (Louis D. Raffis).

10. Modeling Non-maturing Products (Martin M. Bardenhewer).

11. The Net Cash Capital Tool in Bank Liquidity Management (Louis D. Raffis).

12. Managing a Funding Crisis: Citizens First Bancorp, a case Study 1989-1994 (Bruce W. Mason).

13. Liquidity Management at UBS (Bruce Mclean Forrest).

14. Sound Liquidity Management as an Investment Criterion (Dierk Brandenburg).

PART 4. CUTTING EDGE.

15. Dynamic Mdoeling and Optimization of Non-maturing Accounts (Karl Frauendorfer and Micahel Schürle).

16. Liquidity Risk and Classical Option Pricing Theory (Robert A. Jarrow).

PART 5. CONCLUSION.

17. View from the Mountaintop (Leonard Matz and Peter Neu).

Index.

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Leonard Matz is an author, consultant, and bank trainer.  He graduated from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio in 1973. After spending five years with the Federal Reserve as a bank examiner, he spent 14 years in various bank management positions.  Mr. Matz is the author of numerous books as well as magazine and journal articles.  His other books include Interest Rate Risk Management and the Self Paced Guide to Asset/Liability Management Training.  He is a frequent speaker and industry conferences and training programs and has been a member of the National Asset/Liability Management Association since 1989. 

Peter Neu is an author, consultant and former banker living with his wife in Frankfurt, Germany. He graduated in 1994 with a PhD from the University of Heidelberg in Theoretical Physics. After completing a post-doctorate position at MIT, Cambridge M.A., Peter Neu joined Group Risk Control of Dresdner Bank AG in 1997. As a member of Group Strategic Risk & Treasury Control, he worked on various market and credit risk projects and was involved in building Dresdner’s economic capital model before taking over the responsibility for liquidity risk control. In 2005, Peter Neu joined the Boston Consulting Group as its European head of a risk expert team. He frequently speaks at industry conferences and training courses and has published articles on credit risk and operational risk measurement.

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