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Reading Through Colour: How Coloured Filters Can Reduce Reading Difficulty, Eye Strain, and Headaches

ISBN: 978-0-470-85116-6
176 pages
May 2003
Reading Through Colour: How Coloured Filters Can Reduce Reading Difficulty, Eye Strain, and Headaches (0470851163) cover image
The use of coloured overlays on text can improve reading in certain individuals, including children. They have been shown to reduce fatigue and increase fluency and can be used with both dyslexic and non-dyslexic children and adults.

Reading with Colour provides a review and interpretation of the scientific evidence, gathered over the last decade, along with very practical guidance for teachers and parents about how to use the overlays, who will benefit from their use and how to assess their effectiveness.
* Unique - nothing else on this topic
* Comprehensive - includes both the scientific evidence in lay terms as well as practical "how to" information
* Very practical - includes information on classroom management and the design of typefaces for children
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About the Author.

About this Book.

Acknowledgements.

Declaration.

1: Prologue -
Sam's story.

2: In the beginning.

3: What is visual stress?

4: Professionals responsible for eye care and vision.

5: The eye and visual pathways.

6: Why we see the world in colour.

7: What are coloured overlays?

8: How do we know that coloured overlays work?

9: An illustrative case history: David's story.

10: How to test whether overlays will be helpful.

11: How to test using overlays: a guide for teachers.

12: Overlays and classroom management.

13: Use of computers.

14: Meares-Irlen syndrome and dyslexia.

15: Coloured glasses.

16: Why do coloured overlays and lenses work?

17: Frequently asked questions.

18: Support groups.

19: What the future should bring.

20: An Epilogue from Sam's mother.

References.

Index.
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wide spectrum of readership has been addressed optometrists will welcome this concise book (Optician, 13th August, 2004)

I commend it to anyone involved in working with children and adults experiencing difficulties in learning to read (The Psychology of Education Review, August 04)

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