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Sweeteners and Sugar Alternatives in Food Technology

Helen Mitchell (Editor)
ISBN: 978-0-470-99599-0
432 pages
April 2008, Wiley-Blackwell
Sweeteners and Sugar Alternatives in Food Technology (0470995998) cover image
Sugar replacement in food and beverage manufacture no longer has just an economic benefit. The use of ingredients to improve the nutritional status of a food product is now one of the major driving forces in new product development. It is therefore important, as options for sugar replacement continue to increase, that expert knowledge and information in this area is readily available.

Sweeteners and Sugar Alternatives in Food Technology provides the information required for sweetening and functional solutions, enabling manufacturers to produce processed foods that not only taste and perform as well as sugar-based products, but also offer consumer benefits such as calorie reduction, dental health benefits, digestive health benefits and improvements in long term disease risk through strategies such as dietary glycaemic control. Part I of this comprehensive book addresses these health and nutritional considerations. Part II covers non-nutritive, high-intensity sweeteners, providing insights into blending opportunities for qualitative and quantitative sweetness improvement as well as exhaustive application opportunities. Part III deals with reduced calorie bulk sweeteners, which offer bulk with fewer calories than sugar, and includes both the commercially successful polyols as well as tagatose, an emerging functional bulk sweetener. Part IV looks at the less well-established sweeteners that do not conform in all respects to what may be considered to be standard sweetening properties. Finally, Part V examines bulking agents and multifunctional ingredients. Summary tables at the end of each section provide valuable, concentrated data on each of the sweeteners covered. The book is directed at food scientists and technologists as well as ingredients suppliers.

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Preface.

Contributors. PART ONE: Nutrition and Health Considerations.

1. Glycaemic Responses and Toleration (Geoffrey Livesey).

2. Dental Health (Anne Maguire).

3. Digestive Health (Arthur C. Ouwehand, Henna Makelainen, Kirsti Tiihonen and Nina Rautonen).

4. Calorie Control and Weight Management (Julian Stowell) PART TWO: High -Potency (High -Intensity) Sweeteners.

5. Acesulfame K (Bernd Haber, Gert-Wolfhard von Rymon Lipinski and Susanne Rathjen).

6. Aspartame and Neotame (Kay O'Donnell).

7. Saccharin and Cyclamate (Grant E. DuBois).

8. Sucralose (Sam V. Molinary and Mary E. Quinlan) PART THREE: Reduced-Calorie Bulk Sweeteners.

9. Erythritol (Ron Perko and Peter DeCock).

10. Isomalt Anke Sentko and Ingrid Williabald-Ettle).

11. Lactitol (Helen Young).

12. Maltitol and Maltitol Syrups (Malcolm W. Kearsley and Ronald C. Deis).

13. Sorbitol and Mannitol (Malcolm W. Kearsley and Roanld C. Deis).

14. Tagatose (Ulla Petersen Skytte).

15. Xylitol (Michael Bond and Nicholas Dunning) PART FOUR: Other Sweeteners.

16. Other Sweeteners (Mike Lindley) PART FIVE: Bulking Agents: Multi-Functional Ingredients.

17. Bulking Agents: Multi-Functional Ingredients (Michael Auerbach, Stuart Craig and Helen Mitchell).

Index.

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Dr Helen Mitchell, Danisco Sweeteners Ltd, Redhill, Surrey, UK
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Enables food manufacturers to understand the alternative “sweetening” choices from the functional, technical, physiological, nutritional, applications, safety and regulatory perspectives


Information is presented on a product-by-product basis, using tabulated data where relevant within chapters, and in summary at the end of each section


Includes an extensive section on health and nutritional aspects – now one of the major driving forces for a new food product


Contains extensive references for those who wish to explore the subject in further detail

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"Sweeteners and Sugar Alternatives in Food Technology provides the information required for sweetening and functional solutions, enabling manufacturers to produce processed foods that not only taste and perform as well as sugar-based products, but also offer consumer benefits such as calorie reduction, dental health benefits, digestive health benefits and improvements in long term disease risk through strategies such as dietry glycaemic control." (Food & Drink Technology, June 2006)

"This book provides a comprehensive overview of sweetening and bulking solutions and the nutritional enhancement of foods. Manufacturers should find it a key source of information when it comes to the production of appealing low sugar, no added sugar, sugar free, reduced calorie, high fibre, low glycaemic and tooth-friendly food products with a range of corresponding consumer health benefits." (European Baker, May 2006)

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