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A Companion to Digital Humanities

Susan Schreibman (Editor), Ray Siemens (Editor), John Unsworth (Editor)
ISBN: 978-0-470-99986-8
640 pages
April 2008, Wiley-Blackwell
A Companion to Digital Humanities (0470999861) cover image
This Companion offers a thorough, concise overview of the emerging field of humanities computing.

  • Contains 37 original articles written by leaders in the field.
  • Addresses the central concerns shared by those interested in the subject.
  • Major sections focus on the experience of particular disciplines in applying computational methods to research problems; the basic principles of humanities computing; specific applications and methods; and production, dissemination and archiving.
  • Accompanied by a website featuring supplementary materials, standard readings in the field and essays to be included in future editions of the Companion.
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Notes on Contributors.

Foreword: Roberto Busa.

Introduction: Susan Schreibman, Ray Siemens and John Unsworth.

Part I: History:.

1. The History of Humanities Computing: Susan Hockey (University College London).

2. Archaeology: Nick Eiteljorg.

3. Art History: Michael Greenhalgh (Australian National University).

4. Classics: Greg Crane.

5. History: Will Thomas (University of Virginia).

6. Lexicography: Russ Wooldridge (University of Toronto).

7. Linguistics: Jan Hajic (Charles University).

8. Literary Studies: Thomas Rommel (International University Bremen).

9. Music: Ichiro Fujinaga (McGill University) & Susan Weiss (Johns Hopkins University).

10. New Media: Geoff Rockwell (McMaster University) and Andrew Mactavish (McMaster University).

11. Performing Arts: David Saltz, UGA.

12. Philosophy and Religion: Charles Ess (Drury University).

Part II: Principles:.

13. How Computers Work: Andrea Laue (University of Virginia).

14. Classification and its structures: Michael Sperberg McQueen.

15. Databases: Steve Ramsay (University of Georgia).

16. What is Already Encoded by the Text: Jerry McGann (University of Virginia).

17. Text Encoding: Allen Renear.

18. Perspectives and Communities: Perry Willett (Indiana University).

19. Models: Willard McCarty (King's College London).

Part III: Applications:.

20. Analysis and Authorship Studies: Hugh Craig (University of Newcastle, NSW).

21. Preparation and Analysis of Linguistic Corpora: Nancy Ide (Vassar College).

22. Electronic Scholarly Editing: Martha Nell Smith (Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities).

23. Textual Analysis: John Burrows.

24. Thematic Research Collections: Carole Palmer (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign).

25. Print Scholarship and Digital Resources: Claire Warwick (University College London).

26. Digital Media and the Analysis of Film: Bob Kolker.

27. Cognitive Stylistics and the Literary Imagination: Ian Lancashire (University of Toronto).

28. Multivariant Narratives: Marie-Laure Ryan.

29. Speculative Computing: Aesthetic Provocations in Humanities Computing: Johanna Drucker (University of Virginia) & Bethany Nowviskie (University of Virginia).

30. Robotic Poetics: Bill Winder (University of British Columbia).

Part IV: Production, Dissemination, Archiving:.

31. Project Design: Daniel Pitti (University of Virginia).

32. Conversion of Primary Sources: Marilyn Deegan (Oxford University) & Simon Tanner (Kings College London).

33. Text Tools: John Bradley (Kings College London).

34. Interface, Aesthetics, and Usability: Matt Kirschenbaum (University of Maryland, College Park).

35. Electronic Publishing: Michael Jensen.

36. Digital Libraries in the Humanities: Howard Besser (New York University).

37. Preservation: Abby Smith.

Index

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Susan Schreibman is Assistant Director of Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities at the University of Maryland, a faculty member of the University of Maryland Libraries, and Affiliate Faculty in the Department of English. Her recent publications include Computer-Mediated Discourse: Reception Theory and Versioning and ongoing work on the Thomas MacGreevy Archive.

Ray Siemens is Canada Research Chair in Humanities Computing and Associate Professor of English at the University of Victoria. Formerly he was Professor of English at Malaspina University-College and Visiting Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Computing in the Humanities at King's College London. Founding editor of the electronic scholarly journal Early Modern Literary Studies, he is also editor of several Renaissance texts and coeditor of several collections on humanities computing topics.

John Unsworth is Dean of the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is founding coeditor of Postmodern Culture, an e-journal, and founding Director of the University of Virginia’s Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities.

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  • A complete, yet concise overview of the emerging discipline of humanities computing
  • Contains 37 original articles written by leaders in the field
  • Addresses the central concerns shared by those interested in the subject
  • Major sections focus on the experience of particular disciplines in applying computational problems to research problems; the basic principles of humanities computing; specific applications and methods; and production, dissemination and archiving
See More
“Offers the best general introduction to this amorphous field.”
Literary Research Guide
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