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Decisions and Organizations

ISBN: 978-0-631-16856-0
468 pages
January 1991, Wiley-Blackwell
Decisions and Organizations (0631168567) cover image
This book collects together for the first time over 20 of James March's key essays, including those co-authorised with R.M. Cyert and J.P. Olsen and others. The coverage ranges from his early work on the behavioural theory of the firm, through conflict and adaptive rules in organizations, to decision-making under ambiguity (including the famed 'garbage can' model).
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James G. March is Fred H. Merrill Professor of Management and Professor of Political Science and Sociology at Stanford University. He has inspired generations of students with his work in organizational theory. His previous publications include ‘Decisions and Organizations’ (Blackwell Publishing, 1989), ‘Behavioral Theory of the Firm’ (Blackwell Publishing, Second Edition, 1992) and ‘The Pursuit of Organizational Intelligence’ (Blackwell Publishing, 1998).


Thierry A. Weill is Professor of Technology Management at Ecole des Mines in Paris. From 2000 to 2002, he acted as scientific advisor to the Prime Minister of France, Lionel Jospin. He is the author of two books, over 40 scientific papers, and several patents. He chairs a monthly workshop on technology and innovation management.

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* Previously unpublished lectures by the inspirational leader in organizational theory, James March.

* Uses great works of literature to explore the problems of leadership, for example ‘War and Peace’, ‘Othello’, and ‘Don Quixote’.

* Presents moral dilemmas related to leadership, for example the balance between private life and public duties, and between the expression and control of sexuality.

* Encourages readers to explore ideas that are subversive, unpalatable, and may not work in the short term.

* Suggests that today’s leaders are more likely to be motivated by the desire to change the world, than by financial rewards or the lure of promotion.

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