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Postwar Japan: 1945 to the Present

ISBN: 978-0-631-17901-6
228 pages
December 1996, Wiley-Blackwell
Postwar Japan: 1945 to the Present (0631179011) cover image
Within forty years of the end of the Second World War, Japan was transformed from a nation in defeat to one of the most successful economic forces in the world. In this book, Paul Bailey draws on the most recent research to analyse the significance of the American Occupation (1945-52) as well as the later political, social and economic factors that contributed to postwar recovery.
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List of Figures.

Outline Chronology.

Introduction.

1. The Path to 1945.

2. The American Interregnum (1945-1952).

3. The Creation of the Liberal-Democratic Party and Political Conflict in the 1950s and 1960s.

4. The Emergence of an Economic Superpower.

5. A New Imperial Era and the End of the LDP Hegemony.

Guide to Further Reading.

Bibliography.

Glossary of Japanese Terms.
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Paul J. Bailey is a Senior Lecturer in East Asian history at the University of Edinburgh. His previous publications include China in the Twentieth Century (Blackwell, 1988).
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* Provides a much-needed, accessible overview of the Japanese economic miracle.
* Sets economic discussions against clear political and social background.
* Draws on recent research to reexamine complex relationship with the US.
* Offers clear analysis of political events of early 1990's, and end to the hegemony of the conservative Liberal-Democratic party.
* Provides a much-needed, accessible overview of the Japanese economic miracle.
* Sets economic discussions against clear political and social background.
* Draws on recent research to reexamine complex relationship with the US.
* Offers clear analysis of political events of early 1990's, and end to the hegemony of the conservative Liberal-Democratic party.
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"This book will provide historians of modern Japan with a reliable, readable and engaging text to assign in new undergraduate courses that desperately need such an anchor." Professor Jeffrey Eldon Hanes, University of Oregon
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