Wiley.com
Print this page Share

Ramesside Inscriptions, Volume III, Ramesses II, His Contemporaries: Translated and Annotated, Notes and Comments

ISBN: 978-0-631-18436-2
676 pages
July 2013, Wiley-Blackwell
Ramesside Inscriptions, Volume III, Ramesses II, His Contemporaries: Translated and Annotated, Notes and Comments (0631184368) cover image

Description

Based on the hieroglyphic texts of the Ramesside Period of Ancient Egypt (c.1300-1100 BC), this volume of commentaries complements K.A. Kitchen’s previously published Ramesside Inscriptions, Volume III, Translated and Annotated Translations: Ramesses II, His Contemporaries and deals with the monuments and documents of members of the civil, military, and ecclesiastical administrations of Ramesses II.

  • An indispensable and extensive compendium of texts containing the personal monuments, documents, and memorials of all known officials from the reign of Ramesses II from the most senior officials down to the workmen of Deir el-Medina.
  • Contains detailed biographical studies of the careers, achievements and families of Ramesses II’s principal courtiers.
  • Includes a range of funerary texts offering a glimpse into forms of personal piety under Ramesses II.
  • Comprises autobiographical texts displaying a range of self-expression and self-memorialization by officials—records of personal achievements, allegiances, interaction with the divine, and forms of social obligation.
  • The latest in a respected series concerning the texts of the Ramesside Period of Ancient Egypt (c. 1300-1100 BC).
See More

Author Information

Benedict G. Davies is an Egyptologist, freelance writer, and the founder of Iconic Guides, a range of audio tours to sites in the ancient world. He specializes in the community of royal workmen of Deir el-Medina and the Valley of the Kings. His academic publications focus primarily on the social history and literature of the Egyptian New Kingdom, and include Egyptian Historical Records of the Later Eighteenth Dynasty (1992-1995), Egyptian Historical Inscriptions of the Nineteenth Dynasty (1997), and Who’s Who at Deir el-Medina (1999).

See More
Back to Top