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Gender and the Body in the Ancient Mediterranean

Maria Wyke (Editor)
ISBN: 978-0-631-20524-1
232 pages
August 1998, Wiley-Blackwell
Gender and the Body in the Ancient Mediterranean (0631205241) cover image
Gender and the Body in the Ancient Mediterranean builds up an important source of interdisciplinary information for the study of gender and the body in history.
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Abstracts.

Introduction (Maria Wyke).

Articles.

The Essential Body: Mesopotamian Conceptions of the Gendered Body (Julia M. Asher-Greve).

Auguries of Hegemony: The Sex Omens of Mesopotamia (Ann Kessler Guinan).

With This Body I Thee Worship: Sacred Prostitution in Antiquity (Mary Beard and John Henderson).

Men Without Clothes: Heroic Nakedness and Greek Art (Robin Osborne).

Women's Costume and Feminine Civic Morality in Augustan Rome (Judith Lynn Sebesta).

The Ideology of the Eunuch Priest (Lynn E. Roller).

Why Aren't Jewish Women Circumcised? (Shaye J. D. Cohen).

Creation, Virginity and Diet in Fourth-Century Christianity: Basil of Ancyra's On the True Purity of Virginity (Teresa M. Shaw).

Thematic Reviews.

Engendering Egypt (Lynn Meskell).

Re(ge)ndering Gender(ed) Studies (Alison Sharrock).

Manhood in the Graeco-Roman World (Jonathan Walters).

Getting/After Foucault: Two Postantique Responses to Postmodern Challenges (Paul Cartledge).

Reading the Female Body (Helen King).

Gendered Religions (Gillian Clark).

Gender and Sexuality on the Internet (John G. Younger).

Notes on Contributors.

Index
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* Adds to explosion of interest in issues of gender, the body, and history.
* Investigates the centrality of gender distinctions to ancient societies.
* Complements the study of women in antiquity.
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"This is an excellent addition to the study of gender in the ancient world." The Classical Review
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