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Textbook

The Closing of the Middle Ages?: England 1471 - 1529

ISBN: 978-0-631-20540-1
300 pages
September 1997, ©1997, Wiley-Blackwell
The Closing of the Middle Ages?: England 1471 - 1529 (0631205403) cover image
This study looks at the period in its own right without treating it as an epilogue to the Middle Ages or a prelude to modern times.
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Introduction.

Part I: Kings and Kingship:.

1. Kings and Dynasties.

2. Neighbours.

3. Kingship.

Part II: The Dimensions of Politics:.

4. Court and Council.

5. Country Politics.

6. Parliamentary and Popular Politics.

Part III: Nation, Church, Law: .

7. Nationhood.

8. The Church.

9. The Law.

Part IV: Economy:.

10. Social Order.

11. Market Economy.

12. Economic Development.

Conclusions.

Bibliography.

Index.

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Richard Britnell is Reader in History at the University of Durham, where he has taught since 1966. He has published widely, mostly on medieval economic and social history. His previous books include The Growth and Decline of Colchester, 1300-1525 (1986) and The Commercialisation of English Society, 1000-1500 (second edition, 1996).
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* Treats the years 1471-1529 as a period it its own right, re-examining the supposed transition from the medieval to the early modern age.
* Provides a concise overview of internal political activity and foreign relations.
* Explores the relationship between nationality, religion, law and the authority of the crown.
* Offers fresh analysis of commercial and non-commercial economic development.
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"Overall, The Closing of the Middle Ages? provides a wide-ranging introduction to an under-studied period, which students will find well organized and approachable, while scholars will value the stimulus it provides for further investigation and debate." English Historical Review
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