Wiley
Wiley.com
Print this page Share

The Blackwell Handbook of Sensation and Perception

ISBN: 978-0-631-20684-2
804 pages
December 2004, Wiley-Blackwell
The Blackwell Handbook of Sensation and Perception (0631206841) cover image
This state-of-the-art handbook provides an authoritative overview of the field of perception, with special emphasis on new developments and trends.

  • Surveys the entire field of perception, including vision, hearing, taste, olfaction, and cutaneous sensibility.
  • Ideal for researchers and teachers looking for succinct, state-of-the-art overviews of areas outside their speciality, and for anyone wanting to know about current research and future trends.
  • Uses a tutorial approach that results in a balanced description of topics.
  • A 'Selected Readings' section points to general references that provide more detailed treatments of each topic; 'Additional Topics' provide references to important topics.
  • Written by noted authorities in the field.
  • Now available in full text online via xreferplus, the award-winning reference library on the web from xrefer. For more information, visit www.xreferplus.com
See More
Preface.

List of Contributors.

1. Cross-Talk Between Psychophysics and Physiology in the Study of Perception. (E Bruce Goldstein).

2. Principles of Neural Processing. (Michael W. Levine).

3. Basic Visual Processes. (Laura J. Frishman).

4. Color Vision. (James Gordon and Israel Abramov).

5. Visual Space Perception. (Hal A. Sedgwick).

6. Object Perception. (Mary A. Peterson).

7. The Neuropsychological of Visual Object and Space Perception. (Glyn W. Humphreys and M. Jane Riddoch).

8. Movement and Event Perception. (Maggie Shiffrar).

9. Visual Attention. (Marvin M. Chun and Jeremy M. Wolfe).

10. Separate Visual Systems for Action and Perception. (Melvyn A. Goodale and G. Keith Humphrey).

11. Pictorial Perception and Art. (E. Bruce Goldstein).

12. Basic Auditory Processes. (Brian C. J. Moore).

13. Loudness, Pitch and Timbre. (Brian C. J. Moore).

14. Auditory Localization and Scene Perception. (William A. Yost).

15. Perception of Music. (W. Jay Dowling).

16. Speech Perception and Spoken Word Recognition: Research and Theory. (Miranda Cleary and David B. Pisoni).

17. Cutaneous Perception. (Janet M. Weisenberger).

18. Olfaction. (Beverly J. Cowart and Nancy E. Rawson).

19. Taste. (Harry T. Lawless).

20. Perceptual Development: Vision. (Janet Gwiazda and Eileen E. Birch).

21. Development of the Auditory, Gustatory, Olfactory, and Somatosensory Systems. (Lynne A. Werner and Ilene L. Bernstein).

22. Brain Mechanisms for Synthesizing Information from Different Sensory Modalities. (Barry E. Stein, Mark T. Wallace and Terrence R. Stanford).

23. Modularity in Perception, its Relation to Cognition and Knowledge. (Ken Nakayama)

See More
E. Bruce Goldstein is Associate Professor of Psychology and Director of Undergraduate Programs in Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh. He has published numerous papers in visual physiology and visual perception and is the author of Psychology (1994) and Sensation and Perception, 5th edition (1999).
See More

  • Surveys the entire field of perception, including vision, hearing, taste, olfaction, and cutaneous sensibility.
  • Ideal for researchers and teachers looking for succinct, state-of-the-art overviews of areas outside their speciality, and for anyone wanting to know about current research and future trends.
  • Uses a tutorial approach that results in a balanced description of topics.
  • A 'Selected Readings' section points to general references that provide more detailed treatments of each topic; 'Additional Topics' provide references to important topics.
  • Written by noted authorities in the field.
See More
"The Handbook is clearly written and will be appreciated by undergraduate students taking an advanced course in Perception as well as by first-year postgraduate students. Lecturers and professors will also find it useful to brush up their background knowledge and to update their lectures." The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
See More
Back to Top