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Crime and Social Exclusion

ISBN: 978-0-631-20912-6
184 pages
June 1998, Wiley-Blackwell
Crime and Social Exclusion (0631209123) cover image
Via a mutual concern with social exclusion, the agendas of criminology and social policy have begun to overlap far more in recent years. The two fields have always shared a common concern with class, and more recently with race and gender, but remained rigorously differentiated until crime prevention moved higher on political and academic agendas in the 1980s. This collection of papers explores aspects of social exclusion and the measures taken to reduce its impact from the perspective of both disciplines. The contributors write mainly, though not exclusively, from a British perspective, However the issues raised are of broader relevance to North America, Europe and elsewhere. Criminology in Britain has recently been examining the way in which political initiatives designed to contain and exclude dispossessed populations (seen to constitute major crime risks) have permeated all areas of criminal justice policy. In America this has led to an increased emphasis on the rhetoric of retribution, and the 'management' of criminal classes, shifting away from earlier emphasis on 'rehabilitating' individual offenders. Critics of this development increasingly recognise that more practical answers to crime involve not more penal repression but social policies designed to integrate and include the dispossessed, especially the young. It is in this connection that the experience of Singapore offers a different sort of warning.
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1. Editorial Introduction: Catherine Jones Finer and Mike Nellis.

2. Creating a Safer Society: David Donnison.

3. Linking Housing Changes to Crime: Alan Murie.

4. The Local Politics of Inclusion: the State and Community Safety: John Pitts and Tim Hope.

5. Dangerous Futures: Social Exclusion and Youth Work in Late Modernity: Alan France and Paul Wiles.

6. Anti-racism and the Limits of Equal Opportunities Policies in the Criminal Justice System: David Denney.

7. Probation and Social Exclusion: David Smith and John Stewart.

8. Criminal Policy and the Eliminative Ideal: Andrew Rutherford.

9. Framing the Other: Criminality, Social Exclusion and Social Engineering in Developing Singapore: John Clammer.

10. The New Social Policy in Britain: Catherine Jones Finer.

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Catherine Jones Finer is Reader in Comparative Social Policy at the University of Birmingham and Editor of Social Policy and Administration.

Mike Nellis is Lecturer in the Department of Social Policy and Social Work at the University of Birmingham.

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* Begins a new series of books designed to reflect and contribute to the new thinking on social policy. (Broadening Perspectives on Social Policy).
* Addresses topical issues, in view of worldwide concerns about rising crime rates and European concerns about social policy.
* Contains wide-ranging, comprehensive and original coverage of the subject by contributors who are foremost in their fields.
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"This collection provides a thoughtful and incisive commentary on key current developments relating to crime and social exclusion. This is strongly recommended reading for both practitioners and policy makers." Paul Cavadino, National Association for the Care and Resettlement of Offenders "Seven professors plus seven other eminent academics provide a penetrating analysis of the causes and possible remedies for the social malaise which many of us consider is sharply worsening throughout the social spectrum in every continent." Noel G Hustlet, Southwark, Lewisham and Bromley Monthly Meeting "Crime and Social Exclusionis the first in a s series of books especially intended to stimulate fresh thinking by bringing a wide range of disciplines and approaches to bear on the social policy debate. It explores aspects of social exclusion and the measures taken to reduce its impact from the perspectives of criminology and social policy." Gordon Hughes, University of Wales, Cardiff

"Crime and Social Exclusion is an excellent collection of essays which together provide a timeley introduction to important aspects of current debates about processes of social inclusion and exclusion, community and neighbourhood decline, youth crime and criminal justice systems, and the way that state politics and policies intervene in all this. It should be read widely in policy and academic circles and is likely to appear on some quite diverse student reading lists." Robert MacDonald, University of Teesside

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