Wiley
Wiley.com
Print this page Share
Textbook

Reformation Europe: 1517-1559, 2nd Edition

ISBN: 978-0-631-21384-0
292 pages
December 1999, ©1999, Wiley-Blackwell
Reformation Europe: 1517-1559, 2nd Edition (0631213848) cover image
This is G.R. Elton's classic account of the Reformation, revealing the issues and preoccupations which seemed central to the age and portraying its leading figures with vigour and realism.
See More
Maps.

Preface to the First Edition.

1. Luther.

The Attack on Rome.

The State of Germany.

2. Charles V.

3. Years of Triumph.

The Progress of Lutheranism.

Zwingli.

The Wars of Charles V.

4. The Radicals.

5. Outside Germany.

The South.

The West.

The North.

The East.

6. The Formation of Parties.

The Emergence of Protestantism.

The Search for a Solution.

7. The Revival of Rome.

Catholic Reform.

Counter-Reformation.

The Jesuits and the New Papacy.

8. Calvin.

The Meaning of Calvinism.

The Reformation in Geneva.

The Spread of Calvinism.

9. War and Peace.

The Triumph of Charles V.

The Defeat of Charles V.

The End of an Age.

10. The Age.

The Religious Revolution.

Art, Literature and Learning.

The Nation State.

Society.

The Expansion of Europe.

Afterword to the Second Edition by Andrew Pettegree.

Notes.

Further Reading.

Index.

See More
G. R. Elton was Regius Professor of Modern History at Cambridge University from 1983 to 1988. Among his numerous works are The Tudor Revolution in Government (1953), England under the Tudors (1955), Reform and Renewal (1973), The Parliament of England 1559-1581, and The English (Blackwell, 1992). He was founding editor of the Blackwell History of the Modern British Isles. he died in 1994.

Andrew Pettergree is Professor in Modern History at the University of St Andrews and Director of the St Andrews Reformation Studies Institute.

See More
* Revised edition of a popular text.
* Examines the important roles of Luther and Charles V.
* Includes an updated bibliography and an afterword by Andrew Pettegree on Elton's work and the enduring significance of this book.
See More
Back to Top