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Geomorphological Processes and Landscape Change: Britain In The Last 1000 Years

David L. Higgitt (Editor), E. Mark Lee (Editor)
ISBN: 978-0-631-22273-6
324 pages
November 2001, Wiley-Blackwell
Geomorphological Processes and Landscape Change: Britain In The Last 1000 Years (0631222731) cover image
The expert contributors to this cutting edge volume provide an overview of geomorphological process activity and landscape change in Britain over the past 1000 years. The range of the book is unusually broad, encompassing hillslope, valley floor and floodplain, fluvial, estuarine and coastal processes.

  • Provides an overview of geomorphological process activity and landscape change in Britain over the past 1000 years.
  • The range of the book is unusually broad, encompassing hillslope, valley floor and floodplain, fluvial, estuarine and coastal processes.
  • Considers the relevance of technological and conceptual approaches to understanding landscape dynamics.
  • Examines key process environments highlighting significant trends and the influence of human activity, and incorporating examples and modelling.
  • Encourages geographers to look forward to the challenges that geomorphology faces in the new millennium.

Find out more information about the RGS-IBG journals by following the links below:

AREA:

http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0004-0894

The Geographical Journal:

http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0016-7398

Transactions of the Insititute of British Geographers:

http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0020-2754

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List of Figures vii

List of Tables xi

List of Contributors xiii

Preface xv

Figure Acknowledgements xvii

Chapter 1 A Brief Time of History 1
David L. Higgitt

Chapter 2 Back A'long: a Millennial Geomorphology 27
Denys Brunsden

Chapter 3 The Evolution of Hillslope Processes 61
David K. C. Jones

Chapter 4 Valley-floor and Floodplain Processes 90
Barbara T. Rumsby

Chapter 5 Fluvial Processes 116
Janet M. Hooke

Chapter 6 Estuaries and Coasts: Morphological Adjustments and Process Domains 147
E. Mark Lee

Chapter 7 Sediment Transfer in Upland Environments 190
David L. Higgitt, Jeff Warburton and Martin G. Evans

Chapter 8 Fine Particulate Sediment Transfers in Lowland Rural Environments 215
Ian D. L. Foster

Chapter 9 Living with Natural Hazards: the Costs and Management Framework 237
E. Mark Lee

Chapter 10 Geomorphology for the Third Millennium 269
David L. Higgitt and E. Mark Lee

Geographical Index 289

Subject Index 293

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David Higgitt, is Senior Lecturer in Geography at the University of Durham. He has published widely in geomorphological literature including a review series in Progress in Physical Geography, and recent papers in Catena, Geomorphology, Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, Environmental Management. He has also written several invited book chapters.

Mark Lee is Senior Research Associate, Department of Marine Sciences and Coastal Management at the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne. As a consultant geomorphologist he has extensive experience of working on engineering geomorphology projects (especially coastal management) in UK and overseas. Has written numerous papers in geomorphological literature including authoring the recent DoE overviews on soil erosion and landsliding in the UK.

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  • Provides an overview of geomorphological process activity and landscape change in Britain over the past 1000 years.

  • The range of the book is unusually broad, encompassing hillslope, valley floor and floodplain, fluvial, estuarine and coastal processes.

  • Considers the relevance of technological and conceptual approaches to understanding landscape dynamics.

  • Examines key process environments highlighting significant trends and the influence of human activity, and incorporating examples and modelling.

  • Encourages geographers to look forward to the challenges that geomorphology faces in the new millennium.
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"This significant and timely volume provides a contemporary body of information on the function of geomorphological processes in landscape and environmental management in human history." (Choice)

"I enjoyed this particular journey through time, which contains some thought-provoking (though invariably qualitative) observations on the making of the British landscape." (Basil Gomez, Annals of the Association of American Geographers)

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