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The Anthropology of Development and Globalization: From Classical Political Economy to Contemporary Neoliberalism

Marc Edelman (Editor), Angelique Haugerud (Editor)
ISBN: 978-0-631-22879-0
420 pages
January 2005, Wiley-Blackwell
The Anthropology of Development and Globalization: From Classical Political Economy to Contemporary Neoliberalism (0631228799) cover image
The Anthropology of Development and Globalization is a collection of readings that provides an unprecedented overview of this field that ranges from the field’s classical origins to today’s debates about the “magic” of the free market.
  • Explores the foundations of the anthropology of development, a field newly animated by theories of globalization and transnationalism
  • Framed by an encyclopedic introduction that will prove indispensable to students and experts alike
  • Includes readings ranging from Weber and Marx and Engels to contemporary works on the politics of development knowledge, consumption, environment, gender, international NGO networks, the IMF, campaigns to reform the World Bank, the collapse of socialism, and the limits of “post-developmentalism”
  • Fills a crucial gap in the literature by mingling historical, cultural, political, and economic perspectives on development and globalization
  • Present a wide range of theoretical approaches and topics
  • See More
    Part I: Classical Foundations.

    Part II: What is "Development"? Twentieth-Century Debates.

    Part III: From Development to Globalization.

    Part IV: Consumption, Markets, Culture.

    Part V: Gender, Work, and Networks.

    Part VI: Nature, Environment, and Biotechnology.

    Part VII: Inside Development Institutions.

    Part VIII: Development Alternatives, Alternatives to Development?
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    Marc Edelman is Professor of Anthropology at Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.


    Angelique Haugerud is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Rutgers University.

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    • Explores the foundations of the anthropology of development, a field newly animated by theories of globalization and transnationalism

    • Framed by an encyclopedic introduction that will prove indispensable to students and experts alike

    • Includes readings ranging from Weber and Marx and Engels to contemporary works on the politics of development knowledge, consumption, environment, gender, international NGO networks, the IMF, campaigns to reform the World Bank, the collapse of socialism, and the limits of “post-developmentalism”

    • Fills a crucial gap in the literature by mingling historical, cultural, political, and economic perspectives on development and globalization

    • Present a wide range of theoretical approaches and topics
    See More
    "Edelman and Haugerud present a series of analyses that very clearly demonstrate the complexity of practice and debates surrounding the anthropology of development and globalization." (The Kelingrove Review, October 2008)

    “Certainly, it enriches our understanding of development by signalling the interdisciplinary sensibilities of development studies scholarship as well as the complex interplay of political economy, history and culture that shapes development processes.”
    (Development and Change)

    “Anthropology is nothing unless also concerned with contemporary social and political questions. Edelman and Haugerud’s set of readings and wide-ranging, authoritative introduction will be indispensable to scholars and practitioners alike.”
    –Ralph Grillo, University of Sussex

    “Enhanced by the editors’ knowledgeable introduction, which draws attention to anthropology’s silences as well as engagements with classical and contemporary political economy, this comprehensive anthology will be of great value to scholars, students, and practitioners.”
    –Sara Berry, Johns Hopkins University  

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