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The Information Society: Issues and Illusions

ISBN: 978-0-7456-0369-8
208 pages
January 1991, Polity
The Information Society: Issues and Illusions (0745603696) cover image
This book provides an overview of debates about whether we are entering into a phase of social existence without precedent - the 'information society'. Intended as a bridge between the literatures of 'social theory' and the 'social impact of technology', this study exposes the myths surrounding the creation of the information society, discussing technologies such as cable TV and robotics.
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Acknowledgements Preface 1. Introduction: Roots of the Information Society Idea 2. A Marriage of Convergence?The Shaping of IT 3. A New Economy: New Classes? 4. New Technology, Employment, Work and Skill 5. Information, Democracy and the State 6. The Global Dimension 7. Information, Meaning and Culture 8. Information, Ideology and Utopia References Select Bibliography Index
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* Gives an overview of the various versions of the information society thesis.
* Argues that new technology has to be viewed in its social context, but also shows how new technology may have unexpected social consequences.
* Provides a radical critique of the whole notion of the information society, including its global and cultural aspects.
* Provides recent evidence from a number of societies including the UK, the USA, Canada, Japan, Korea, France, Germany and Sweden.
* Gives an overview of the various versions of the information society thesis.
* Argues that new technology has to be viewed in its social context, but also shows how new technology may have unexpected social consequences.
* Provides a radical critique of the whole notion of the information society, including its global and cultural aspects.
* Provides recent evidence from a number of societies including the UK, the USA, Canada, Japan, Korea, France, Germany and Sweden.
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"This is a lucid exposition of the empirical, conceptual and ethical issues surrounding the idea of the information society. In analysing significant contemporary transformations associated with the growth of information technology, David Lyon has clearly demonstrated the importance of the sociological approach." John Eldridge, University of Glasgow
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