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Linux Programming For Dummies

ISBN: 978-0-7645-0691-8
336 pages
December 2000
Linux Programming For Dummies (0764506919) cover image
Linux(r) Programming For Dummies(r) is the fast and easy way to get up-to speed on designing, developing, and debugging programs on the Linux platform.

For a sample from the book go to: www.dummies.com/extras/linuxprog.html
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Introduction.

PART I: A Beginner's Introduction to Linux Programming.

Chapter 1: Checking Out How Linux Programming Works.

Chapter 2: Designing Your First User Interface.

Chapter 3: Writing Your First Linux Program.

PART II: The Basics of Writing Code.

Chapter 4: Getting Indecisive with Variables.

Chapter 5: Interfacing with the User.

Chapter 6: Who Were Those Masked Operators?

PART III: Making Decisions.

Chapter 7: The if, if else, and if elif Statements.

Chapter 8: The case Statement.

Chapter 9: Nested Control Structures.

PART IV: Loops and Loops.

Chapter 10: The while Loop.

Chapter 11: The for in Loop.

Chapter 12: Nested Loops and Quick Exits.

PART V: Writing Subprograms.

Chapter 13: Waxing Efficient with Functions (So You Don't Have to Retype Code!).

Chapter 14: Getting Down with Subprograms.

Chapter 15: Understanding Arguments ... Not the Ones with Your Mother-in-Law.

PART VI: Database Programs and Printing.

Chapter 16: Working with Database Files.

Chapter 17: Making Your Program Print Stuff Out.

PART VII: Debugging Your Program.

Chapter 18: Getting Chatty with Comments.

Chapter 19: Stamping Out Bugs in Your Program.

PART VIII: Automating E-Mail.

Chapter 20: Getting Goofy with E-Mail.

Chapter 21: Automatic E-Mailing.

PART IX: The Part of Tens.

Chapter 22: Ten of the Most Useful Linux Utilities.

Chapter 23: Ten Sources of More Linux Programming Information.

Chapter 24: Ten Linux Programming Topics That Didn't Fit Anywhere Else.

PART X: Appendixes.

Appendix A: Glossary.

Appendix B: When the Moon Hits Your Eye Like a Big Piece of vi.

Appendix C: Shell Conversion.

Appendix D: Linux Programming Exercises.

Appendix E: Surfing for Sample Code.

Index.

Book Registration Information.
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Jim Keogh is the chair of the Software Development for Electronic Commerce track at Columbia University and the author of more than 40 computer books.
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Sample Code

Well, if you made it here, you're either totally lost or came here looking for the sample code from Linux Programming For Dummies. If you're one of the latter, you're at the right place. (If you're one of the former, the best I can do is suggest hitting your browser's Back button!)

Follow these steps to download the sample code from the book in one oh-so-conveniently zipped file:

1. Go to the Downloads tab and click the link for the Sample code:


Your computer asks where you want to save the file.


2. Choose a location on your hard drive to download the file to and then click OK.


The compressed file downloads to your hard drive. Depending on whether you have your Web browser set up to automatically extract zipped files, your computer either launches WinZip itself and asks if you'd like to extract the compressed file or you have to start WinZip yourself, locate the file on your hard drive, and extract the files manually.

For more info on WinZip, see www.winzip.com.


3. Extract the text files from the compressed file and do whatever you want with them.


The easiest way to use the sample code is to copy and paste the text from a text file into a compiler or wherever else you want to use it.
7.19 KB Click to Download
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