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Giving Notice: Why the Best and Brightest are Leaving the Workplace and How You Can Help them Stay

ISBN: 978-0-7879-9809-7
240 pages
October 2007, Jossey-Bass
Giving Notice: Why the Best and Brightest are Leaving the Workplace and How You Can Help them Stay (0787998095) cover image
A groundbreaking book that offers approaches for changing the hidden biases in the workplace

This is an eye-opening examination of the causes and dynamics of bias in the workplace, offering a psychological, political, and societal analysis of the actual cost of bias to the bottom line. The authors make the hurdles that women and minorities face in the workplace as personal to the reader as they are to those who face them. Giving Notice is filled with sensible approaches for solving the current imbalance and challenges us to rethink unconscious ideas about stereotypes and commonly accepted business practices.

Freada Kapor Klein (San Francisco, CA) is an internationally noted consultant and diversity expert. She has been quoted in the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, and on the Today show, Nightline, and NBC Nightly News. Kimberly Allers (Bayshore, NY) was a writer at Fortune magazine and is a frequent guest speaker at professional development and women-oriented seminars. Martha Mendoza (Santa Cruz, CA) is a national writer for the Associated Press. She won a Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting.
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Introduction.

1 The Meritocracy Myth: Is the Playing Field Level?

2 Slights Unseen.

3 From the Top.

4 The Cost of Bias.

5 Does Blink = Bias?

6 Dismantling Barriers from the Inside.

7 Know the Signs from the Outside.

8 Bias Around the World.

9 Ten Steps Back.

10 Toward a New Framework.

A What’s in a Resume?

B Determining the Cost of Unfairness.

C Sources of Corporate Leaver Stories.

Notes.

References.

Acknowledgments.

The Author.

Index.

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Freada Kapor Klein co-founded the Level Playing Field Institute. Based in San Francisco, the LPFI is dedicated to improving fairness and opportunity in the workplace through educational programs and workplace training. LPFI strives to identify and remove hidden barriers from the classroom to the boardroom.

Kimberly Allers, a writer at Fortune magazine and senior editor at Essence, is a frequent guest speaker at professional development seminars.

Martha Mendoza is a national staff writer for the Associated Press. In 2000, she won a Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting.

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"Is the corporate playing field still an obstacle course for people who are “different?”  Freada Kapor Klein, one of America’s leading diversity advocates, thinks so. In Giving Notice, she and her coauthors tell you why  and what to do about it.  This refreshing and eye-opening new book blasts the ‘diversity industry’ and the ‘meritocracy myth-makers’ for ignoring the daily indignities and subtle biases that shape career prospects. Giving Notice tells it like it is and then tells it like it could be, offering every American a vision of workplaces that are good for people, companies, and the economy."
Rosabeth Moss Kanter, professor, Harvard Business School and best-selling author of Confidence: How Winning Streaks and Losing Streaks Begin and End

"This book will clearly set the new standard for the field.  I think it will be amazing and it should be required reading for anyone in the investment business."
David Blood, managing partner, Generation Investment Management and former CEO, Goldman Sachs Asset Management

"Freada Kapor Klein provides many insights into the microdynamics of diversity issues and even more insights into policy issues, organizational dynamics, and ways to change practice. She takes fundamental issues and articulates them in a very concise, engaging, and easy-to-digest way. Her examples are interesting, often humorous, and always clear."
Stephen Small, chair, African American Studies, University of California, Berkeley

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