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Hair Loss Disorders in Domestic Animals

Lars Mecklenburg (Editor), Monika Linek (Editor), Desmond J. Tobin (Editor)
ISBN: 978-0-8138-1934-1
288 pages
September 2009, Wiley-Blackwell
Hair Loss Disorders in Domestic Animals (0813819342) cover image
Hair Loss Disorders in Domestic Animals is an in-depth reference on the pathomechanisms and clinical approaches of all skin diseases in domestic animals that have hair loss as the predominant clinical feature. It presents both basic and clinically-relevant knowledge on alopecic disease in animals. This text is a one-of-a-kind resource providing cutting-edge coverage of the physiology and pathology of hair follicles. Disease-specific chapters include: a detailed description of the disease entity, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical and histopathological diagnosis and treatment modalities.
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I. Hair follicle physiology and anatomy.

1. Hair follicle phylogeny and ontology.

2. Physiology and anatomy of hair follicle cycling.

3. Comparative aspects between domestic animal species, laboratory animals, and humans.

II. How to approach alopecic diseases.

1. Clinical aspects.

2. Histopathological aspects.

III. Non-inflammatory alopecias of domestic animals.

1. Congenital diseases of hair follicles.

Hair follicle aplasia.

Dyplasia and trichomalacia.

Melanocytic.

Unclassified congenital alopecia in domestic animals.

2. Acquired hair shaft abnormalities/acquired trichomalacia.

Wool slip in sheep.

Alopecia caused by malnutrition.

3. Disorders of hair follicle cycling.

Hyperthyroidism.

Telogen arrest and telogen effluvium.

Hyperadrenocorticism.

Hyperestrogenism.

Classical Alopecia X in plush-coated breeds.

Canine recurrent flank alopecia.

Canine pattern baldness.

Acquired alopecia in Water Dogs.

Acquired alopecia in other breeds.

4. Hair follicle dystrophy.

5. Hair follicle atrophy.

Cutaneous vasculitis.

Dermatomyositis.

Traction alopecia.

Feline paraneoplastic alopecia.

Scarring/cicatricial alopecia.

6. Traumatic alopecia.

Psychic alopecia in cats.

Pruritus.

IV. Inflammatory alopecias of domestic animals.

1. Luminal folliculitis.

Neutrophilic luminal folliculitis and furunculosis.

Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis.

2. Mural folliculitis.

Lymphocytic interface folliculitis.

Granulomatous/histiocytic folliculits.

3. Bulbar folliculitis.

Alopecia areata.

V. Appendix.

Therapeutic dose of drugs frequently used to treat alopecia.

Endocrine function tests.

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The Editors:

Lars Mecklenburg, DVM, PhD, Cert. Vet. Pathologist, is an independent consultant in veterinary pathology in Hamburg, Germany.

Monika Linek, DVM, DECVD, is Head of the Dermatology Referral Service at Veterinary Specialists of Hamburg in Hamburg, Germany.

Desmond J. Tobin, PhD, FRCPath, FIBiol, is Professor of Cell Biology at the Centre for Skin Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford in Bradford, West Yorkshire, Great Britain

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  • First book on alopecia in veterinary medicine
  • Cutting-edge coverage of physiology and pathology of hair follicles
  • Special coverage on disease classification
  • High-level, in-depth reference on the pathomechanisms and clinical approaches of skin diseases in domestic animals
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"It is an excellent addition to the library of any board-certified veterinary dermatologist, resident in a veterinary dermatology program, and veterinary clinician with a special interest in companion animal dermatology." (Vet Med Today, 15 June 2010)

"Hair Loss Disorders in Domestic Animals is the first book to exhaustively review a subject that is such a common clinical problem. This book is well organized and easy to read. It initially provides a concise, understandable review of hair follicle biology that is essential for understanding the pathogenesis of alopecic disorders, including excellent descriptions and histologic images of hair follicle anatomy and development." (Vet Med Today, August 2010)

"Provides a concise, understandable review of hair follicle biology that is essential for understanding the pathogenesis of alopecic disorders, including excellent descriptions and histologic images of hair follicle anatomy and development. This book contains an accumulation of essential, current information about alopecic disorders in animals that is not easily accessible from other sources. It is an excellent addition to the library of any board-certified veterinary dermatologist, resident in a veterinary dermatology program, and veterinary clinician with a special interest in companion animal dermatology." (JAVMA, June 2010)

"This book is a delight. It is beautifully illustrated and concisely written. Not only does it provide much practical information but it makes a positive contribution to the discipline." (Veterinary Record, March 2010)

"The editors and authors have done an excellent job of summarizing current theories of hair follicle development and function and presenting the most current information on hair loss disorders affecting domestic animals. ... This is the first book to present such detailed information. ... As such, it is a much needed textbook." (Doody's, April 2010)

"This resource would be a worthy addition to the practice library, and very valuable to anyone tackling a dermatology module for the RCVS CertAVP. For someone embarking on a dermatology diploma, this text is worth it for the hair follicle biology chapter alone." (Veterinary Times, August 2010)

 

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